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rather make jackets, 
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have no time for making, remnants of 

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useful. 

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aam.e, or " for Manmad School," on each 

.tttide i also name of sender, otherwise 

they are apt to get mixed. 

I hope yon will not think this a begging 

letter; but I know so many would be wilf 
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Tin- NK-V YORK 

PUBLIC LIBllARY 



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MSISTANT HOMK DIMKCTOn. 

WALTER B. SLOAN. 
SECRCTARV, 

F. MARCUS WOOD. 
KDITOMIAL SCORrrARY, 

MARSHALL BROOM HALL,S.A. 




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CHINA 
AND THE GOSPEL 



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AN ILLUSTRATED^REPORT 



OF THE 

CHINA INLAND MISSION 

1906 



CHINA INLAND MISSION 

LONDON, PHILADELPHIA, TORONTO, MELBOURNE 



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MB VEW TOftK 
PUBLIC LItUtLY 

278935B 

Ama. LWOX AND 

»«W FWNDAHONS 

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INTRODUCTORY NOTE 

The title, The Lcmd of Svnim^ used for the C.I.M. illustrated 
Reports for the two years 1904 and 1905, has, in deference to 
a request from an Association existing in England in aid of 
the Church of England Mission in North China, been changed 
to China and the Gospel. This Association has for some 
years had a small quarterly paper issued under the same title. 
The Land of Sinim — a fact not known to the C.I.M. when 
that name was adopted. 

Although the title has been changed, the volume has 
been prepared along the same lines as before. The ortho- 
graphy of Chinese places is that at present used by the 
Chinese Imperial Postal service, but it is hoped that ere 
another year has passed there will be published a new and 
permanent orthography for postal and telegraph use. When 
this is issued the C.I.M. will adopt the same in its maps and 
reports, and thus avoid the present confusion, a confusion 
unavoidable until this whole question has been permanently 
settled. 

In sending forth this Report more than twelve months 
from thfe time when Mr. Hudson Taylor, the beloved 
foimder of the Mission, was called to his reward, there are 
special causes for praise and thanksgiving. Not only have 
the temporal needs of the work been graciously provided, 
but the love and harmony existing within the Mission have 
been abundantly maintained, while increasing blessings have 
crowned the labours of God^s servants. 



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Gknkrai. 
;-C.l.M. . 
Kan-suh . 
Shen-si 
Shan-si 
Chih-u 
Shan-tonq 

Ho-NAN 

KlANQ-SU . 

Sl-CHUAN . 
KWEI-CHOW 

YUN-NAN . 
Hu-PEH 

KlANGHSI . 

Ngan-hwei 
Cheh-kiano 

Hu-NAN 



Stations and Missionaries of C.l.M. 
Alphabetical List of Missionarii<:s 
Martyrs of C.I.M. . 
Statistics of C.l.M. . 

ACCOITNTS OP C.l.M. . 

List of Missionary Societies in China 
C.LM. Home Centres and Councils 

Appendix 

General Index 

Index of Stations of C.LM. 



PAOS 
1 

13 
22 
26 
32 
42 
44 
48 
54 
59 

67 

70 

73 

75 

85 

90 

100 

103 

119 

126 

128 

139 

148 

150 

155 

159 

161 



CONTENTS 



Review op the Year — Generai 
Review op the Year — C.I.M. 
Provincial Report : Kan-suh 

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Shan-si 
Chih-u 
Shan-tonq 

Ho-NAN 

Kianghsu 

S'i-CHUAN 

Kwei-chow 

YUN-NAN 

Hu-PEH 
KlANGHSI 

Ngan-hwbi 
Cheh-kian6 

Hu-NAN 



Stations and Missionaries of C.I.M. 
Alphabetical List op Missionaries 
Martyrs op C.I.M. . 
Statistics op C.I.M. . 
Accounts op C.I.M. . 
List op Missionary Societies in China 
C.I.M. Home Centres and Councils 
Appendix ...... 

General Index ..... 

Index op Stations op C.I.M. 



PAOB 
1 

13 
22 
26 
32 
42 
44 
48 
54 
59 

67 

70 

73 

75 

85 

90 

100 

103 

119 

126 

128 

139 

148 

150 

155 

159 

161 



ILLUSTRATIONS 



OF Mission 



Mr. D. E. Hoste^ General Director of C.l.M. 

Chinese Map of Postal Stations in Ho-nan . 

Facsimile of Part of Chinese Women's Daily Paper 

Historical Chart .... 

The Approach to Shanghai 

Officials and Missionaries at Opening 

Press 

The Honoured Dead 

The late Mr. Whitridge 

Boats at Mouth of the Han River 

Widow of the late Pastor Hsi 

Travelling by Cart 

Bible Revisers at Work . 

The Shanghai Business Department 

The Fu-shun Mission Station . 

Chen-tu Church Leaders with Mr. J. Vale 

An Old Imperial Palace at Yun-nan Fu 

Three Veteran Missionaries . 

£lder of ^^ Ferry " Church^ Bing-yae . 

Interior of Chang-teh Mission Station . 

Map of C.I.M. Stations .... 



PAGE 

Frontispiece 
ix 
xi 



xu 
To face page 7 



99 



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11 

14 
19 
26 
38 

42 

47 
54 
63 

71 

73 

96 

100 



End of Volume 



Vll 



THE CHINESE IMPERIAL POST OFFICE 

^^ Routes and Communications. — 307 more offices have been opened 
during 1905 ; new connections are numerous. Land lines by couriers 
now measure about 121,000 li (40,000 miles) ; by native boats, 15,000 li 
(5000 miles); and by railway lines, 8350 li (2780 miles). Some 
districts, and not always the most productive ones, have courier systems 
of enormous length; among these are — Peking, with 3200 li, for a 
large portion along the difficult road via Nankow and Kalgan to 
Kueihuach'eng ; Taiyuan, with 3900. li, right across the mountainous 
regions of Shansi ; K'aifeng, in the northern part of Honan, with 
4700 11, partly foot and partly mounted couriers, the latter connecting 
at Taming-fu with the Chinan system, and through Chenchow and 
Tungkuan with the Hsi-an system"; Hsi-an itself has nearly 7000 li,- 
almost exclusively worked by mounted couriers running regularly up 
and down to Lanchow, the capital of Kansuh. The above are all 
important connections, which, in their way, aided by the new Peking- 
Hankow Railway, have revolutionised communications in North China. 
Before the completion of that railway the quickest way from Peking to 
K'aifeng, Hsi-an, and Lanchow was through Shanghai and the river ; 
K'aifeng is now reached in two and a half days, Hsi-an within ten days, 
and Lanchow in twenty-one days. Taiyiian, till a few years ago some 
fifteen days distant, only requires one week's journey, which two years 
hence, on the completion of the Chent'ou branch line, will be further 
reduced to under two days. In Shantung the Tsingtau-Chinan Rail- 
way, completed during the year, has brought the provincial capital 
within twelve hours' reach from the seaboard, and, equipped with an 
intricate system of foot and mounted couriers, the province is now admir- 
ably served postally in all directions. . . . For overland connections, 
Chungking, with its 15,000 li of foot couriers, is quite remarkable ; the 
whole of its postal connection with Central and Eastern China is kept 
up through one single line, Ichang to Chungking, a distance of over 
1800 li, or 600 miles. In ordinary times this journey is covered by 
foot couriers in thii*teen days for letter or &st mails, and seventeen days 
for newspapers or heavy mails. . . . Among other districts prominent 
for their land lines may be quoted Yochow, with 3800 li ; Changsha, 
3400 li ; Hankow, 8200 li ; Kiukiang, 4800 li ; Foochow, 3600 li ; 
Amoy, 4400 li ; Wuchow, 5200 li ; and Canton, 6200 li. Several are 
far beyond usual proportions in area, and concentrated efforts there are 
difficult at this early stage of organisation. No doubt, in course of 
time railway lines will transform these regions, as they have so rapidly 
transformed North China." — Report on the Post Office, China, Imperial 
Maritime Customs, 1906, p. xxxvii. 

• • • 

Vlll 



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CHINA 
AND THE GOSPEL 



CH^^^^»** ^ ^ 



AN ILLUSTRATED^ REPORT 



OF THE 

CHINA INLAND MISSION 

1906 



CHINA INLAND MISSION 

LONDON, PHILADELPHIA, TORONTO, MELBOURNE 



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REVIEW OF THE YEAR— GENERAL 

Any one who will give the accompanying comparative 
historical chart the briefest study, will hardly be astonished 
at the fact that the Chinese are proud of their past history, 
and that they have regarded with some measure of contempt 
the junior nations of the world. With an empire established 
long before the days of Abraham, and with a history which 
has witnessed the rise and fall of most of the greatest empires 
of the world, China has, imquestionably, a national heritage 
of which she may justly be proud. Despised, however, by 
the new world powers as antiquated and decadent, she has in 
return despised them as upstarts and barbarians. 

Compelled by force to open her doors to foreign inter- 
course, she has reluctantly yielded, and for many years it has 
appeared as though the impact of the old and new was to 
result in the break-up of that ancient Empire. With 
aggressors on the north and south who were roobing her of 
her dependencies, with wealthy and powerful sea-powers who 
were seizing her most valued harbours and ex^oiting her 
natiuul wealth, with a steady and ruinous inflow of opium 
which was poisoning her people and depleting her treasury, 
the " break-up of China "^ has appeared as a not improbable 
sequence. 

To-day, however, the outlook has materially changed, and 
there are many signd which suggest the thought that China, 
the oldest ana greatest nation in the world, may even yet 
attain to an equality with — if not a superiority over — ^ner 
most vigorous of nationisd rivals. With a vitality which 
has sustained her, and a genius which has governed her 
through four thousand years of chequered history, there 
seems every prospect that China, by the adoption oi modem 

1 B 



2 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

civilisation, will be more than able to maintain her own in 
the competition of empires. 

The Yeae 1905 

The year just past (1905) will stand out throughout 
subsequent history as the year which has, so far as man can 
judge, definitely secured for China a new lease of life. 
Dehvered by the great war between Japan and Russia — a war 
terminated by the Treaty of Portsmoutn, signed on September 
5, 1905 — from the dangers which have threatened her on 
the north, she has had Manchuria generously restored to her 
by that Power which only ten years previously had dis- 
possessed her of Formosa, while tne renewal of tne Alliance 
between England and Japan, signed on August 12, 1905, 
guarantees among other things the integrity of the Chinese 
Empire. In the same connection may be mentioned the 
Treaties between China and Japan, signed December 22, 
1905, and that between Great Britain and China concerning 
the great dependency of Tibet. More secure than she has 
been for many long years past in her relations with foreign 
powers, China^s chief problems to-day are of an internal 
nature, and these she is earnestly and strenuously setting 
herself to solve. 

While 400 millions of people cannot at the best but move 
slowly, there are many indications at those vital centres 
which affect the body of the nation that great changes are 
coming over China. Wt China has the material, l^th in 
men and resources, has never been disputed, and it has been 
generally conceded that, given a powerful leader, there is 
nttle that China could not accomplish. It is not improbable 
that that leader has already arisen, for the enormous and far- 
reaching reforms already introduced by the strong hand of 
H. E. Yuen Shih-kai are sufficient to indicate that should his 
life be spared to carry through what he has begun, China 
will be revolutionised within the next decade or two. 

China's Modern Army 

The war correspondents who were present at the dreadful 
struggle between Japan and Russia have, in their subsequent 
visits to China, been amazed at the progress made and the 
efficiency already attained by the modem Chinese army. 
Military attaches who went, as they thought, "to see a 



REVIEW OF THE YEAR— GENERAL 3 

picnic ^ at the Chinese military manceuvres, held last October, 
^^ returned to Peking declaring that they had seen a modem 
army, and averring that they had assisted at a display 
momentous and epoch-making in the history of the Far 
East.^ 1 

"It would have been hard,^ wrote the correspondent of 
the Morning Post more recently, concerning an inspection of 
troops at Pao-ting Fu, " to match the smartness and precision 
of the movements in any pai*ade-ground in the world. When 
the battalion marched past with a flat-footed Grerman step, it 
was impossible not to admire the rigid straightness of their 
lines, the erect carriage and soldierly bearing of the men.'*' 

Writing from Wu-chang, the Rev. Arnold Foster of the 
L.M.S. says concerning that city: "In the camps a new 
generation of men are^bein^ tmined in habits o^ prompt 
obedience and disciplined action, of which their fathers knew 
nothing. Such a training given to the tens of thousands of 
soldiers who are being subjected to it must greatly affect the 
general life of the people at large. Here," he writes, " is a 
new educational element in modem Chinese Ufe.'" 

As another and significant fact connected with the modem 
army of China, it must be mentioned that no opium-smoker 
is allowed to enter the ranks. When Manchuria alone can 
supply China with at least half a million of ponies, practically 
all fitted for mounted infantry, when troops such as have 
been referred to above can be multiplied indefinitely out of 
China's countless millions, there is a potentiality in China 
which may well cause the serious reflection of the nations of 
the world. Such facts as these alone, apart from every other 
consideration, would justify, and more than justify, every 
effort being made to Christianise China. What an armed 
but unevangelised China might be to the menace of the 
world it is appalling to even imagine. 



The Opiuai Cukse 

In addition to the fact that opium-smokers are excluded 
from China^s modem army, it is plainly manifest in other 
directions that China is seeking to grapple with the gigantic 

^ The TivMSy December 28, 1905. The possession by the Chinese Govern- 
ment of an efficient military force, is a powerful factor in favour of peace in 
China, as they can deal rapidly with local disorders. This has been illustrated 
three times recently in Shan-si, Ho-nan, and Eiang-si. 



4 CfflNA AND THE GOSPEL 

evils of opium-smoking. Among other indications may be 
mentioned the appeal of four of China'^s leading Viceroys ^ 
— men who rule over eight of China^s provinces with more 
than 179,000,000 of people. These men have jointly 
appealed to the Chinese Foreign Office requesting that Board 
to open up negotiations with the British Minister in Peking 
for the assistance of Great Britain in a scheme for the sup- 
pression of the opium curse.^ The example of Japan in dealing 
with opium-smoking in Formosa has also inspired H.E. Yuen 
Sh'ih-kai with the hope that similar steps may be taken in 
China, and it is stated in reliable qiiarters in Peking that 
instructions are soon to be sent to the Viceroys and Governors 
of the various provinces to put his scheme into operation. 

China's New Educational Policy 

Amon^ the many reforms now being advocated in and 
adopted by China, one of the most significant and far- 
reaching is that connected with her educational policy. By 
one stroke of the pen, a system which has been in vogue for 
more than a thousand years has been swept away, and that 
before any one is prepared to cope with tiie problems of a 
revised eaucationai policy. The edict issued on September 2, 
which not only abolished the old educational system, but 
the very degrees of B.A., M.A., and LL.D. themselves, was the 
result of a memorial presented to the throne by six of China'^s 
highest officials,^ among whom are numbered some of the 
most conservative of the old Confucian school. A memorial 
backed by such a list was practically irresistible, and the edict 
consequently soon appeared abolishing the old, and sub- 
stituting in its place a system of specialised education for 
which diplomas will be granted in each department. This 
edict has since been followed by another, issued on April 25, 

^ These Viceroys are : H.E. Yuen Shih-kai, Viceroy of Chih-li, residing at 
Tien-tsin ; H.K Chou Fu, Viceroy of Kiang-su, Kiang-si, and Ngan-hwei, 
residing at Nan-king : H.E. Ts'en, Viceroy of Euang-tung and Kuang-si, 
residing at Canton; H.E. Chang Chih-tung, Viceroy of Hu-peh and Hu-nan, 
residing at Wu-chang. 

' Since the above was in type the British House of Commons on May 30, 
1906, unanimously condemned the opium trade as *' morally indefensible." 

3 H.E. Yuen SMh-kai, Viceroy of Chih-li ; H.E. Chao Erh-shun, Viceroy of 
Lower Manchuria ; H.E. Chang Chih-tung, Viceroy of Hu-peh and Hu-nan ; 
H.E. Chou Fu, Acting Viceroy of Eiang-su and Kiang-si ; H.E. Ts'en Ch'un- 
hsuen, Acting Viceroy of Euan^-tung and Euang-si ; and H. E. Tuan Fang, 
Governor of Hu-nan, one of the commissioners to visit Europe, and since 
appointed as Viceroy of Fu-kien and Cheh-kiang. 



REVIEW OF THE YEAR— GENERAL 5 

1906, abolishing the post of Provincial Literary Chancellor, 
and substituting an Educational Commissioner, thus com- 
pleting the abrogation of the old system. 

When it is remembered that the change affects about two 
millions of Chinese graduates and undergraduates, the far- 
reaching import of the step will be somewhat realised. It is 
estimated that China will need more than a quarter of a 
million primary schools alone to bring her educational system 
into line with that in vogue in Japan. For this great need 
she has not yet the supply of teachers, so that, though the 
old system has been abolished, the student class liken them- 
selves to men groping in the dark who "cannot find the 
way,^ or to weavers, whose loom has been disorganised, who 
" cannot find the thread.^ It is not to be wondered at that 
the missionary, under such circumstances, is not a little 
perplexed by the importunate pleadings of the student class 
for direction and guidance in the matter of education. How 
rightly to use this opportunity, without being turned aside 
from the primary duty of preaching the Gospel, needs not 
a little wisdom and grace. 

In the efibrt to grapple with the educational problem thus 
created, the temples of China are being converted into schools, 
and the old. examination halls into colleges, while thousands 
of Chinese young men are flocking to Japan.^ 

In Peking the old Examination Hall, which had accom- 
modation for more than 10,000 students, is being, or has been, 
transformed into a naval college, while the Peking University 
is being enlarged, the site of the new buildings covering an 
area of 20,000 Chinese acres,^ and the dormitories being 
suflicient to accommodate 20,000 students. 

In an interesting article on the educational outlook at 
Wu-chang, the Rev. Arnold Foster of the L.M.S. recently 
wrote : — " One eflect of the present educational movement 

^ *'Two young men who set sail from Ghekiang nine years ago were the 
first Chinese students to be officially commissioned to go to Japan. Three 
years ago there were 591 Chinese students in Japan ; in 1904 they increased 
on an average at the rate of 100 a month. At the beginning of January 1905 
there were 2406 Chinese students in Japan ; by the end of November they 
numbered 8620. Ninety-eight per cent of the Chinese students in Japan are 
at Tokio. - They come from all parts of China, with, so far, the exception of 
EansQ. Hunan, once the most t>ackward province, is now in the lead with 
17 per cent of the total number ; Hupeh, Eiangsu, and Szechuan send about 
13 per cent each, and Chekiang, Chihli, and Euantung about 7 per cent each. 
The remaining 23 per cent is fairly evenly distributed among the ten other 
provinces. It is thus seen to be a movement of national dimensions and 
therefore of national significance." 

3 About 3000 English acres. 



6 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

has been largely to transform the appearance of Wu-chang. 
Colleges ana school buildings have been going up in all parts 
of the city. Large vacant spaces that many years ago were 
open to the public have now been fenced in for college 
grounds. Bookshop abound, in which maps, diagrams, 
and Western school-books, etc., are on sale. Li one very 
large depot, maintained by the Viceroy, all sorts of educa- 
tional apparatus, from a slate-pencil to a manikin, can be had 
at reduced rates. . . . To-day the streets of Wu-chang swarm 
with soldiers and with students. Boys, young men, and men 
of middle age wearing uniforms of the various schools and 
colleges are everywhere to be met with. Sunday is a holiday 
in all the schools, and on that day the students are specially 
in evidence. A few come to our services. Some of us are 
contempkting special services for their benefit, and indeed 
something in this way has already been attempted.*" 



Modern China 

Dr. Griffith John, whose more than fifty years in China 
specially qualifies him to speak, has recently written : — " China 
is not only waking up, she is awake, ana very much awake. 
The China that I found asleep, on my arrival at Shanghai 
fifty years ago, is now all alive and going to school again, 
ana is doing so willingly, gladly, eagerly. I have just been 
looking over something I wrote about China and the mission 
work in China ten years ago, and it reads like ancient history. 
It is practically true of the state of things then existing, but 
it has very little application to what I see around me to-day. 
We are in a new China already. What an opportunity is 
opened up before the Missions in China these days. There 
is no reason why China should not be evangelised within this 
century, so far as China herself is concerned.'' 

While the Chinese have always been lovers of their 
country, their, patriotism has of necessity in the past been 
somewhat of a local and provincial nature, but with the 
coming of means for quicker communication, with the linking 
of distant provinces by the telegraph wire, and with the more 
rapid dissemination of news by an ever-increasing daily press, 
the spirit of the people, which has always been " China for 
the Chinese,'' is now finding expression in united and con- 
certed action. The serious boycott of American merchandise, 
which has, according to The Times^ decreased American 



TFTE NEW YORK 

I'UBIIC LIBiiAUY 






/, 



REVIEW OF THE YEAR— GENERAL 7 

impoii;s into China by 70 per cent,^ and the redemption by 
China, at the cost of dei,360,000, of the right to build the 
Canton -Hankow Railway, with other similar movements 
connected with railways and mining syndicates, are abundant 
proofs of this new spirit'.* "European papers condemn the 
cry of * China for the Chinese,' but surely,'' writes the Peking 
correspondent of The Times, "betokening as it does the 
awakening of a consciousness of nationality, the movement is 
one requiring friendly guidance and encouragement." 

While a Chinese Foreign Minister has recently acknow- 
ledged that China is not yet ripe for the abolition of the 
extra-territorial rights claimed by foreigners, China is steadily 
seeking to amend her judicial system, and has during the 
past year abolished torture from her courts of law. 



The Population of Shanghai 

An interesting indication of the increasing intercourse 
between East and West is seen in the figures of the recent 
quinquennial census of the foreign and native populations of 
Shanghai and by the trade returns of China. Between 1887 
and 1897 the foreign trade of China nearly doubled itself, 
while between 1897 and 1905 the increase was equal to 70 
per cent. According to that census there are 11,497 
loreigners in Shanghai, of whom 3713 are British, ^159 
Japanese, 1329 Portuguese, 991 Americans, 785 Germans, 
and 568 Indians. The increase of the Japanese from 736 in 
1900 to 2159 in 1905 is striking and significant. The 
Chinese population in the foreign settlement, exclusive of the 
French section, was 126,665 in 1885, 240,995 in 1895, and 

^ The following figures given by Mr. James R. Morse of the American 
Trading Company ne^ little comment. They show the power of a blood- 
less war. 

" Our purchases on orders from Chinese, beginning with July 1904, have 
been as follows : — 

July to December 1904 .... $1,491,300 

January to June 1905 .... 1,095,000 

July to December 1905 (after the boycott) 290,750 

January to March 1906 .... 32,500 

This month we have had no inqniries from Shanghai for cotton goods. In 
my opinion, our only salvation is the passage of uie Foster or some similar 
Bill assuring the better treatment of officials, students, and merchants 
desirous of visiting this country." 

^ Mr. Consul-Ceneral Fraser in his Report on Hankow for 1905, says : — 
"The Chinese authorities are showing a determined disposition to recover 
China's resources of profit and power — in other words, to ciu*tail to the utmost 
the rights granted to foreigners by the treaties.'' 



*i 



8 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

452,716 in 1905, which shows that it has nearly doubled 
itself every ten years. 

Though Chma, with its great rivers and vast and populous 
plains, frequently suffers more or less severely from floods, 
the floods of 1905 have been more than usually disastrous, 
and have extended over areas as far apart as Yun-nan, 
Si-chuan, and Shanghai. In Si-chuan it is estimated that as 
many as 88^ houses were damaged, while round about 
Shanghai and the mouth of the Yang-tz from 2000 to 3000 
pei*sons were drowned, and the damage done to property in 
Shanghai alone was estimated to be not less than J^1,000,000. 

Local Riots 

On the whole China has been maintained in peace 
throughout the year, although in several districts local 
risings have threatened missionary operations. At Lien-chou, 
in the province of Kuang-tung, tne riot unfortunately led 
to the loss of the lives of four members of the American 
Presbyterian Mission and one child. That at Chang-pu 
resulted in the destruction of the property belonging to tne 
English Presbyterian Mission; while at Nan-chang Fu five 
Roman Catholic priests, and Mr. and Mrs. Kingham and 
child, of the Brethren'^s Mission in Kiang-si, lost their lives. 
The riot at Shanghai might have had more serious con- 
sequences, had not the prompt action of the various Powers 
represented there taken the matter in hand at once. 

While the fears of friends at home have been, not un- 
naturally, aroused by these disturbances, thei'e seems little 
ground for apprehending any general rising in China. These 
troubles have all been of a local nature, with local causes. 
The Peking, correspondent of The Times wrote on April 20, 
1906 : — " I can discover no reason for the exaggerated fears 
with which the world has been regarding China for some time 
past. In this vast empire, with its crude methods of police, 
its deplorable administration of justice, its national ignorance, 
and the credulity of its people, local disturbances may occur 
at any time, but there is no reason for apprehension that the 
position of foreigners in China is moi'e insecure than at any 
time during the past fifty years.*" 

General Missionary Progress 
On all hands evidences show that mission work is being 



REVIEW OF THE YEAR— GENERAL 9 

greatly prospered, the chief difficulty of the workers being 
their inability to cope with the overwhelming opportunities 
which appear on all sides. Writing of the changed spirit of 
the people, Dr. Griffith John has recently said : — 

^^ I have been thinking a good deal these days of the ease 
with which the idols are being dislodged, and the temples 
converted into schools. There was a time when it would 
have been dangerous for the officials to attempt such profana- 
tion of sacred things. Some great change must have come 
over the minds of the people, and the question is, to what 
this change is to be ascribed. I ascribe it to the missionary 
teaching that has been going on during the past fifty years, 
and I have no hesitation in ascribing it in a large measure to 
the Christian literature that has been sown broadcast on the 
face of the land. The people^s faith in the idols has been 
greatly undermined, and this will account to a great extent 
K)r the things we see to-day.'' 

As an illustration of the progress that has been made in 
the opening of mission stations a few facts concerning the 
work in the one province of Si-chuan may be given. Prior 
to 1876 there was not a single missionary settled in the 
province, nor a single mission station. In 1877 the work 
was commenced by the opening of Chung-king as a mission 
centre. By 1886, ten years later, 3 other stations were 
opened, and by 1895 there were 22 stations scattered 
throughout the vast province. At the end of last year, 
1905, there were in all 300 stations and out-stations in the 
province, manned either by the foreign worker or the native 
pastor or evangelist. This is, of course, counting the work of 
all Societies. In connection with this encouraging fact, 
it must, however, be stated that there are 3000 towns 
and villages still unopened to the Grospel message — not un- 
opened because the people are hostile, but because the 
staff of workers is wholly inadequate to avail itself of the 
opportunities. 

Bible Cieculahon 

Few things are more encouraging than the continuance of 
the remarkable sales of Scriptures in China. During the 
year, the British and Foreign Bible Society printed in China 
1,300,968 Bibles and Scripture portions, being an increase of 
109,617 on the previous year ; while their issues to mission- 
aries and sub-agents amounted to 1,219,048, or an increase of 



10 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

126,000 on the issues of 1904. The National Bible Society 
of Scotland likewise reports an increase in its issues, 907,274 
Bibles and portions having been issued during 1905^ as 
against 883,490 in the previous year, or an increase of 98,490 
copies. 

Taking the actual circulation — ^not issues ^ — of the British 
and Foreign Bible Society for the last few years, the figures 
read as follows : — 

Total circulation prior to 1900 . 8^240^573 

Circulation for 1900 604,462 

„ „ 1901 431,446 

„ „ 1902 872,304 

„ „ 1903 933,965 

„ „ 1904 1,088,333 

„ „ 1905 1,075,180 

Total circulation of B. and F. Society to date 13,246,263 

Taking the Bibles and Scripture portions issued by the 
three great Bible Societies in China for the year 1905, the 
figures are as. follows : — 

The British and Foreign Bible Society . . . 1,219,048 copies 
The National Bible Society of Scotland . 907,274 

The American Bible Society . . . . 537,304 



99 

99 



Giving a grand total for the year of . . . 2,663,626 ^ „ 
or an advance of about one-third of a million on the previous year. 

When it is remembered that nearly all these books are 
sold,^ it will be seen that there is a steadily growing demand 
in China for the word of God. What the influence of such 
literature is, has already been referred to in the quotation 
from Dr. Grifiith John'^s letter. 

TeACT DlSTEIBUnON 

While it is not possible in this Report to give the figures 
showing the circulation of tracts issued by the many Tract 
Societies in China, the returns of the Central China Tract 

^ Some of the books issued from the Bible House may still be among the 
missionary's stock. These are not counted as in circulation. 

^ As the three Societies sometimes buy certain Scriptures the one from 
the other, which count as sales, a small number of the books mentioned in 
this total have been counted twice. 

> Of the 1,219,048 issued by the B. and F. Society, all but 28,611 copies 
were sold, and of the 537,304 issued by the A. B. Society, all but 10,379 
copies were sold. 



' THE NKW YQKH- 






SSL*?'- «J -jS/ 


^^ 






1 








■P^^^^BLM^Li^BfiMl 


Jl^HI 1 




► ^, 


ij,,"" *~— • ' 


1 





REVIEW OF THE YEAR— GENERAL 11 

Society are sufficient to show what a great work is being 
accomplished in this department of Christian activity. With 
the growth of the work, Tract Societies have been springing 
up dl over China. In the form of a most interesting little 
brochure entitled Light in the East^ the Central China Tract 
Society has issued its thirtieth Annual Report. According to 
this the total circulation of this one Tract Society since 1875, 
when it was founded, has been 26,007,917 publications, of 
which 2,565,524 were circulated last year. When it is re- 
membered that these tracts have found their way not only 
into the various provinces of China, but into Manchuria, 
Mongolia, Siam, Tonquin, Australia, the Straits Settlements, 
California, British Columbia, Japan, Korea, and almost all 
the places where the ubiquitous Chinese are to be found, it 
will be seen how great is the importance of such tract work. 

The following figures show the circulation of this one 
Society during the last few years : — 

Tracts circulated from the C.C.T.S. during ld02 . 1^470,699 

„ „ „ 1903 . 2,171,655 

„ „ „ 1904 . 2,539,180 

„ „ „ 1905 . 2,565,524 

In view of the increasing opportunities before this Society, 
it has been decided to erect special premises for the better 
conduct of the work, and these are to be regarded as a 
memorial of Dr. Griffith John'^s Jubilee in China, Dr. John 
having been from the beginning the heart and soul of this 
Tract Society. 

Among the items of general interest connected with the 
progress of the Gospel m China should be mentioned the 
triennial gathering of the Chinese National Christian En- 
deavour delegates at Ningpo. The audience on this occasion 
numbered as many as 1500 persons who had come — despite 
the untoward conditions of the weather — from every coast 
province and every open port from Chefoo to Canton, as well 
as from provinces as far east as Ho-nan, Hu-peh, and Hu-nan. 
Foreign delegates also came from Japan, Korea, the Sandwich 
Islands, the United States, with speakers from England, 
Australia, and Germany. 

One item of special interest was the presence of the three 
principal officials of the city at the session when the duty 
and relation of Christians to their respective Governments 
was discussed, the officials themselves adaressing the audience 
on this subject, recommendine^ the Christians to obey the 



12 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

instructions which had been read to them from the Apostle 
Paulas Epistle to the Romans and from 1st Peter. This fact 
is but one of the many evidences of the changed attitude of 
the official classes to the work of foreign missions. Such a 
thing would have been impossible only a few years ago. 

In the Appendix at the end of this volume will be found 
some interesting facts and statistics which, if viewed from the 
standpoint of Christian missions, emphasise the importance 
of the evangelisation of China. The rapid progress of events 
in that land calls for strenuous effi[>rts on the part of the 
Christian Church. 



II 



REVIEW OF THE YEAR— C.I.M. 

^* Remember them that had the rule over you, which spake unto you 
the word of Ood; and considering the issue of their life, imitate their 
faith, Jesus Christ is the .same yesterday, to-day, yea and for everj*^ — 
Hebrews xiii. 7, 8. 

This Apostolic injunction comes home with peculiar force to 
the China Inland Mission to-day ; for, since the last Annual 
Meeting was held, the beloved Founder and Director, Mr. 
Hudson Taylor, has been taken from our midst. It is well, 
therefore, that we should Remember, Consider, and Imitate ; 
for, though he is gone, Jesus Christ, his Confidence and 
Leader yesterday, is the same for us to-day, yea and for 
ever. "Daily and inci'easingly we would pray that the 
I'emembrance of the blessed departed may be made, in the 
hands of the Spirit of God, a moral power upon us. The 
recollection of their 'conversation' and its *end,' of the 
standard with which alone, in sight of death, they could be 
content, shall be welcomed in upon our lives. It shall tell 
upon our highest duties, upon our most minor habits, as a 
forming, chastening, ennobling, sanctifying force.*" 

The death of Mr. Hudson Taylor has not imnaturally 
emphasised, in a more public manner, the magnitude of the 
responsibility which rests upon his successor m the Greneral 
Directorship, although Mr. D. E. Hoste accepted the office 
of Acting General Director of the Mission in 1901, and that 
of Greneral Director in 1903. With deep gratitude to God 
for the gifts and graces with which He has endowed His^ 
servant for the weighty and onerous office to which he haa 
been appointed, we would bespeak for him a special place 
in the prayers of all friends of tne Mission. The momentous 
issues of missionary work, involving both the honour of God's 
nanxe and the welfare of immortal souls, call for the most 

13 



14 



CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 



earnest prayer and strenuous eflfort May we not be found 
wanting! 

The Honoured Dead 

It is no small cause for thankfulness that, though the 
summer last year was the hottest known for a long time, 
the health of the members of the Mission was wonderfully 
preserved, while only six were removed by death. The 
names of these are: the Rev. J. Hudson Taylor, the 
beloved founder and director of the Mission, to whose 
home-call reference has been made in the opening paragraphs 
of this Report ; Mr. A. E. Amott, who died of consumption 
in Australia; Mr. H. C. Burrows, formerly Lieutenant in 
H.M. Navy; Mr. Charles Chenery, who was accidentally 
drowned when travelling by boat in Kwei-chow ; Dr. A. L. 
Shapleigh, who died of small-pox, and Mr. B. T. Williams, 
whose death resulted through blood-poisoning while in 
England on furlough. 



New Woekers 

During the year 44 new workers joined the ranks of 
the Mission, bringing the total membership of the Mission 
up to 849, which is the highest number yet reached. While 
rejoicing in this inci*ease in the number of workers seeking 
to make known the " unsearchable riches of Christ "^ to the 
perishing millions of China, there is need for earnest and 
constant prayer, that the Mission may be kept faithful to 
those high and holy tiuditions which it has inherited from 
him who, under God, laid the foundations of this work. 
History points to the danger of decline in all human 
organisations, and nothing but earnest prayer, with spiritual 
watchfulness, can save the Mission from this peril. 

The arrivals in China from the various countries are as 
follows : — 



Country. 

England . 
N. America 
Australasia 
Germany . 
Sweden 
China 



Total . 



ReturnecL 



19 men, 11 women 
„ 3 



New workers. 



9 
3 
2 


19 



5 
2 
1 


22 



6 men, 14 women 
2 „ 
4 .. 2 

2 „ 3 

3 „ 4 
„ 4 






17 



97 



41 



■"■V" 

44 



Total. 

43 

5 
13 
10 
10 

4 

85 
85 



[ 



TIIK NEW YCriK 

PUBLIC LICUAKY 



I 



ASTOn, Ll-XOX, AN!) 

TILDL'N lOLNiJAIieNS 

11 L 



REVIEW OF THE YEAR— C.I.M. 16 

Of the 849 members of the China Inland Mission on 
January 1, 1906, 156 were associates connected with six 
affiliated Societies. The following table will give at a glance 
the Mission'^s staff and stations : — 





Men. Single Women. 


Wives. 


Widows. 


Total. 


stations. 


Members . 


. 271 221 


184 


17 


693 


158 


Associates . 


. 64 54 


3^ 


2,- 


156 


47 




jj^' t7^' 


5^ 


-/; 


849 


205 



BAPnsMs 

The privilege has been again granted to the Mission of 
seeing a gracious harvest to the labours of its workers. The 
baptisms reported last year for 1904 numbered 2476, which 
was the hignest recorded in any year up to that time. This 
year the reports, so far as they are to hand, give a total * of 
^41 baptisms, which number will in all probability be 
slightly increased when the fiill reports are to hand. It will 
thus be seen that during the last two years more than 5000 
Chinese have publicly confessed their faith in Chi-ist by 
baptism, and been imited in fellowship with those believers 
connected with the work of the Giina Inland Mission alone. 
From the commencement of the Mission^s work in China, it 
has been privileged to receive into Chrisf s Church by baptism 
21,648 pei*sons, many of whom have already entered into the 
presence of their Lord. Shall we not pray that all those 
who are yet spared (14,078) may be filled with God's Holy 
Spirit, and be made His instruments for blessing among 
their own people ? 

Income 

While faith has been tested, and that at times somewhat 
severely, it is once again the Mission's joy and privilege to 
raise its Ebenezer in testifying to God's mercy in suppljring 
the financial needs of the work. 

The following is a brief summary of the total income of 
the Mission from all sources during 1905. The full balance- 
sheet for England, the United States and Canada, and 
Australasia, with an abstract of the Associates' funds,^ will 
be found at the end of the volume. 



^ The funds of the Associate Missions are simply transmitted from the 
various Societies to their workers on the field. 



16 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

The toted income of the Mission from cM sources during 
1906 was asfoUows : — 

Received in England £45,034 5 1 

United States and Canada ($51,786*29) 10,788 15 11 

„ Australasia 3,925 11 

„ China . . . . . . . 9,997 5 5 

£69,045 17 5 
Received in China for Associate Missions . . 10,860 10 1 

£79,906 7 6 

For the sake of comparison the following figures giving the 
total income of the Mission from all sources for 1904 are 
given. They are a^foUaics : — 



Received in England . £49,096 7 5 

9,691 1 9 

3,667 16 8 

1,938 5 6 



„ United States and Canada . 

„ Australasia. 

China 



»9 



Tota 
Received in China for Associate Missions 

Grand Total 



£57,393 10 9 
8,300 16 1 

£65,694 6 10 



From these figures it will be noted that the income for 1906 
shows a total increase of <£7282 : : 8 over that for 1904, 
though the increase is only J^40:7:6 over that received 
duiing 1902. For this gracious provision, all given in answer 
to prayer, it is right that thanks should be given to God, 
by " many persons on our behalf.'' May He who is no 
man's debtor reward all those who have so generously given 
of their substance, and have thus sought by their gftls and 
prayers to have fellowship with GoJs servants in China. 
How precious many of these gifts are, only He who sitteth 
over the treasury is really able to know. The following 
letter, only one of many equally touching gifts, will indicate 
the self-denial so frequently associated with those who 
contribute of their substance to the furtherance of God's 
work in China: — 

My DEAR Mr. Last Whit Monday I borrowed a map from 

you and gave a short address on China at our anniversary 
gathering. A yomig widow in humble circumstances^ having 
had to break up her home and store her furniture, that she 
might take a situation, felt, while listening to my remai^cs, that 
she must devote her dining-table and two vases to the Lord, for 
China. She has just disposed of them, and I now have the 
pleasure of enclosing postal order for 29s. from her. 



REVIEW OF THE YEAR— C.LM. 17 

While deeply grateful to God for the increase in income 
which He has granted, it is only necessary, to avoid any 
misapprehension on the part of the friends of the Mission, to 
state that, with the increase of the Mission^s staff, Which is 
now higher than ever before, and the decrease in the 
exchange, the increase of income does not betoken any 
superabundance in the Mission^s financial position, though 
all need has been most graciously supplied. Viewed from 
the standpoint of a gold currency, the increase appears more 
than is the fact when it is viewed from the standpoint of the 
actual value of the money on the field. For some time past 
the exchange of gold into the silver currency of China has 
been against the interests of the Mission. In illustration of 
this it may be said that whereas dfi^lOOO at the beginning of 
1905 would exchange for 8000 ounces of silver in Shanghai, 
the same sum in December 1906 would only obtain 7000 
ounces of the same currency. At the same time it may also 
be mentioned that with the opening up of China the cost of 
living has a natural tendency to increase. 

Self-Support 

Year by year there are increasing signs that the Church 
in China is be^nning to recognise its responsibility in 
becoming a self-supporting, self-propagating, and self- 
governing Church. In last year's Report, reference was 
made to a determination on the part of the Churches 
connected with the Bing-yae centre to provide annually 
$450 towards the pastoral needs of their Churches, with the 
addition of a sliding scale of $6 per annum, until they could 
bear the whole financial responsioility. Not only have they 
fulfilled their undertaking, but they have far exceeded it. 
Instead of $456, which was the burden they had undertaken 
for the year, the Church contributed no less than $611 
towards pastoral expenses, while in addition to this they 
built four new churches, with four manses for their Chinese 
pastors, towards the expenses of which undertaking they 
contributed $104S. The total contributions of the 537 
members connected with this Bing-yae Church amounted to 

$1839. 

In Kwei-ch**i, in the province of Eiang-si, the Church 
contributed over $500, while at Kan -chow, in the same 
province, the Chinese contributions amounted to $^S, or 
an average of nearly $4 per member. In the province of 

c 



18 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

Shan-si the total contributions of the Chinese Christians 
amounted to 1233 Shan-si taels, or about .£^200 in English 
money, apart from what they subscribed towards the 
expenses of their schools, etc. These are but some 
encouraging illustrations of the way in which the Church 
is seeking to bear its own financial bui*den. 

To the many friends who have read the helpful biography 
of Pastor Hsi, it will be of interest to know that 1100 men 
and women in the Hung-tung district passed last year 
through the Opium Refuges, which owe their origin to him. 
One of the results of this work has been that during the year 
several new villages have been opened to the Gospel, while 
about 150 families are known to have given up idolatry and 
professed their faith in Christ, not to speak of the goodly 
number of well -tested former opium -smokers who have 
during the year been received into the Church by baptism. 

Some Special Items of the Year 

Attention may be called to one or two special features of 
the past year's work. In the far north-west, Mr. G. W. 
Hunter has been itinerating alone in the new frontier 
province of Sin-kiaug. The lonely and trying nature of this 
work, in a region where there are no resident Protestant 
missionaries, is such that we would bespeak for him a special 
interest in the prayers of God'^s people. 

In the south-west a gi*acious work of God's Holy Spirit 
among the Miao aborigines has been manifest, and wisaom 
and grace are needed to rightly control and direct this move- 
ment. Also from several other far-separated districts a 
distinct movement of God's Spirit among the people is 
reported. For some time many of the Chinese Christians 
have been definitely and daily praying for an outpouring of 
God's Spirit ; shall we not imite oin: prayers with theirs for 
the same blessing ? 

In the province of Shan-si, important decisions were made 
at the recent provincial Conference, when over thirty 
missionaries and sixty Chinese delegates from all the Churches 
in Central, Eastern, and Western Shan-si connected with the 
C.I.M. met together. The tentative constitution and rules 
drawn up during the previous year were carefully reconsidered, 
and then definitely accepted by all the Churches represented. 
At the same time, important decisions as to co-operation in 
educational and evangelistic work were made. For these 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBKAIIY 






REVIEW OF THE YEAR— C.I.M. 19 

indications of the edification of the Church of Christ in China, 
may all praise and glory be to Grod alone. 



Personalia 

In concluding this brief report, loving mention should be 
made of the removal by death during the year of Sir Greorge 
Williams and Dr. Bamardo. For more tiian twenty years in 
succession the late Sir Greorge has presided at one of the 
annual meetings of this Mission, and has shown his warm 
interest in its work, while Dr. Bamardo was for some time a 
fellow medical student with Mr. Hudson Taylor, and had 
even contemplated the giving of his life to work in China. 

In view of Mr. Hostess absence from China, we would 
especially commend the Rev. J. W. Stevenson to the prayerful 
sympathy of God^s people. At all times a heavy burden of 
work falls upon his shoulders, and at this time in particular 
the pressure becomes the more heavy and responsible. 

Loving sympathy is also expressed towards Mr. J. F. 
Broumton, who, after thirty years of arduous work in China 
— for many years of which time he held the responsible 
position of Treasurer in Shanghai, — has been compelled, owing 
to continued physical weakness, to resign his Treasurership 
and leave China. Deepest sympathy is felt with the beloved 
friends in Australasia in the recent death from t}rphoid fever 
of Mr. Whitridge, who for some years has been Secretary for 
the C.I.M. work at that centre. For the recovery of Mr. 
Polnick, the Director of the Barmen Associates, from 
pneumonia, sincere thanks are given to God. In connection 
with the work of the Grerman centres, Messrs. Zantopp and 
Eaul — membei-s of the Councils in that coimtry — ^have sailed 
during the year for China for an extended visit, with a view 
to becoming better acquainted with the need and conditions 
on the field. 

Many friends will also be thankful to know that Dr. and 
Mrs. Howard Taylor have been devoting all their energies 
to the preparation of the authorised Life of Mr. Hudson 
Taylor, and while it is too early yet to say when this will be 
completed, good progress has been made. It is also hoped 
that a standard Atlas of China will be published by the 
Mission in the course of the next twelve months. The maps 
are being executed by Mr. E. Stanford, the well-known 
geographer, and will be published with a book containing 



20 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

articles on the various provinces written by many of the 
best authorities on China. 

In conclusion, while recording with gratitude the many 
mercies of the past year and the gracious signs of blessing 
which have been vouchsafed, it is essential that the measure 
of success granted should not blind us to the immeasurable 
needs of CUna which remain, and to the great responsibility 
which rests upon the Chiu^ch at home in responding to them. 
While coimtless millions of China^s people are yet ignorant 
of the way of salvation, the present conditions afford unpre- 
cedented opportimities for reaching them with the message 
of life. If it is estimated that a quarter of a million of 
Primary Schools are needed to meet China's educational 
demands, how many workers are needed to adequately point 
her to Him who is the Wisdom of God. 

Not only are the needs of China great, but the nation is 
recognising the fact, so the importance of strenuous effort to 
meet the felt need can hardly be overestimated. At a time 
when serious national problems are in danger of dividing the 
Church of Christ at home and of giving rise to sectarian 
bitterness, is there not the greater need that the bond of 
love to our Master and of love to those for whom He died 
should be drawn the closer, that '' all who profess and caU 
themselves Christians^ should show themselves the more 
united in their determination to obey the last command of 
Christ to " preach the Gospel to every creature.^ 



REPORTS FROM THE PROVINCES 



KAN-SUH 

SHEN-SI 

SHAN-SI 

CHIH-LI 

SHAN-TONG 

HO-NAN 

KIANG-SU 



Sl-CHUAN 

KWEI-CHOW 

YUN-NAN 

HUPEH 

KIANG-SI 

NGAN-HWEI 

CHEH-KIANG 



HU-NAN 



21 



THE PROVINCE OF KAN-SUH 

ARJSAf 125,450 square miles, or slightly larger than Norway. 
Population, 10,385,3769 or twice a^ many a^ Sweden, 

This province derives its name from two of its leading cities^ Kan- 
chow Fu and Suh Chow. A large proportion of the population are 
Mohammedan^ and the province has suffered much through frequent 
Mohammedan rebellions. There are also Tibetans^ Manchus^ Mongols, 
Turks, Aboriginal Tribes, and immigrants from other provinces. The 
people, except on the Tibetan border, are irreligious, probably because 
so many are absent from their ancestral homes. Mission work was 
commenced in this province by Messrs. Easton and 6. Parker of the 
C.LM. in 1876. Long journeys were taken in the early days far 
beyond the borders of uie province, even as far as Kulja. 

The C.LM. now has 10 stations, 1 out-station, 42 missionaries, 19 
native helpers, and 147 communicants. 

C./.ilf. Superintendent — G. Andrew 

The reports from this province are on the whole en- 
couraging and speak of progress. 

Lan-chow. — ^The continuity of the work at this station 
has been somewhat hindered by the removal of some of the 
workers to other centres. The street chapel generally 
attracts a fair number of hearers, and for a part of the year 
it was opened twice a week in the evenings. The attend- 
ances at the Lord's Day services were good during the first 
half of the year, but somewhat decreased afterwards, there 
being about thirty men and twenty women. These are fairly 
regular comers, and after the Chinese New Year the numbers 
will rise again. EflForts are being made to get in touch with 
many of the students in this city, and for this purpose a 
special supply of educational and Christian literature has 
been obtained. In the summer the workers rejoiced in the 
admission of seven persons into the Church by baptism, some 
of whom had been prayed for for a long time. Medical work 
has been carried on in the city and also at Wu-ch'iien part 
of the year by Dr. Hewitt and Mr. Preedy. Many of the 

22 



THE PROVINCE OF KAN-SUH 88 

patients have come from a considerable distance, and to each 
a copy of the Gospel has been given. Some 769 patients 
have been treated, 72 of these being in-patients. It is 
interesting to know that one of the women baptized in July 
was brought into touch through the medical work. Prayer 
is asked tibat more suitable premises for a hospital may be 
obtained. 

At the out-station of Tah-sin-ying the Christians have 
made progress in knowledge and grace. The collections in 
the native Church have amounted to over thirty-four dollars. 

Tsin-chow. — Regular evangelistic work has been carried 
on in the street chapel and on the streets, the street chapel 
being open three nights in the week as well as in the day. 
During the examinations a shop opposite the examination 
hall was lent by the senior deacon, and here many of the 
students heard the truth, one of the new countiy inquirers 
attributing his decision to the Word he then heard 
preached. 

At Hsi-ho Hsien a small shop has been opened and a 
helper appointed. Monthly services have been held in four 
places in the district, two at Wu-kia Chimg being very en- 
couraging. Special meetings were held for coimtry inquirers 
for ten days in November, at which fifteen men were present 
from these villages and towns. Out of seventeen applicants 
for baptism, three men and foiu: women have been received, 
while m the Church a society has been formed with the object 
of engaging in evangelistic work for seeking the deepening of 
the spiritual life of the members. The collections for the year 
have amounted to over forty Shanghai taels. In connection 
with the women's work over sixty towns and villages have 
been visited, especially to reach the women, five months being 
spent in this effort. Both the Boys'* and Girls' Schools have 
lieen giving encouragement. 

Fu-kiang:. — ^This station has been without a resident 
missionary during the year, and the work has consequently 
suffered, some of the members being lax in Sabbath ob- 
servance. In this Church a society has also been formed, with 
the object of deepening the spiritual life of the members and 
engaging in evangelistic effort. 

Liang^-chow. — Here the work is carried on at two centres. 
Mr. and Mrs. Belcher returned from the coast in Maj, the 
work before that time being in the care of Mr. Fiddler. 



24 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

Daring the year a Sunday morning prayer-meeting has been 
started, and a teaching class on Moncmys for the helpers, 
the average attendances at the Sunday morning services being 
about fifty-two. In the afternoon evangelistic meetings are 
held at both centres, and during the week many homes have 
been visited, especially to reach women, and special classes 
held for them. Four persons have been baptized during the 
year, and there are several hopeful inquirers. 

Twenty persons on an average have been treated in the 
dispensary per week, and some of the professed Christians 
are a result of this medical work. The Bible Society 
colporteur finds the work very hard, and lately said, ** I did 
not know the people hated the ddctrine so.^ 

Sin-kiang. — Mr. G. W. Hunter has made Liang-chow 
his headquarters for his special itinerations in North- West 
Kan-suh and Sin-kiang. In the spring he went as far as 
An-hsi Chow, and when the report was written he was on 
another journey, hoping to reach Hami and Urumtsi, and 
possibly even further. Special prayer is asked for Mr. 
Hunter, that he may be greatly helped in these long and 
lonely journeys. The area of Sin-kiang is more than half a 
million square miles, or larger than Tibet, and Mr. Hunter is 
the only Protestant missionary seeking to evangelise this vast 
region. 

Si-ning^. — The work here has been specially encouraging 
after the many years of hard labour with little fruit in the 
past. Nine persons have been baptized and there are several 
inquirers. The Sunday services have been well attended 
with an audience of sixty or more, many of the persons 
coming from the coimtry. Among the visitors to the guest- 
hall there have been not only Chinese, but Tibetans and 
Mohammedans, etc. A special efibrt to reach the officials and 
gentry was made by holding Lantern Services, the " yamen ^ 
ladies coming on certain occasions. The surrounding district 
has been worked, the Christians assisting, but more workers 
are needed, and the Mission premises in the city are incon- 
veniently small. 

Ning-hsia. — ^The evangelist Wang had held the fort 
at this place, but in face of many trials. Some of the 
Christians seem quarrelsome, and others have fallen into the 
sin of opium-smoking. The city has been visited by Mr. 
Belcher and Mr. Hunter. 



THE PROVINCE OF KAN-SUH 25 



The Scandinavian Alliance Mission 

This Mission has its work situated in South-East Kan-suh 
and on the Si-an Plain. 

The reports of the Kan-suh stations are given here ; those 
of Shen-si, under that province. . 

Ping-liang Fu. — During the year a Native Conference 
of the Christians at this centre and from the surrounding 
country met in the city, 23,600 cash being contributed 
towards the expenses of this gathering. The work both in 
the city and district is encouraging, the chapel, which seats 
about 260, being well filled on Sunday and Thursday. There 
have been 6 baptisms during the year, and the 24 scholars 
in the Boys' School have made good progress. Between 600 
and 700 persons have been helped medically and 13 opium 
patients treated. Nine thousand books and tracts have 
been sold and between 6000 and 6000 books given away at 
the officials' own request to the students present at the 
examinations. 

The school for the children of the missionaries connected 
with the Scandinavian Alliance is also situated at this 
station. 

Chen-3ruan. — ^The work at this centre has suffered through 
lack and change of workers. There are some 10 pupils in 
the Girls' School and 40 in the Boys' School. Regular meet- 
ings are conducted in the city, and the market districts 
visited. Some 20 inquirers with 20 other persons regularly 
attend the services. 

No report has been received from Ching-ning-chow, Chong- 
sin, and Ching-chow. 



THE PROVINCE OF SHEN-SI 

Area, 76,270 square mileSf tiearly equal to the area of 
England md Wales^ or the State of Nebraska. Population^ 
8,450,182, nearly equal to the population of Scotland and 
Irehmd, 

This proviuce^ the uame of which means '^ West of the Passes/' has 
three natural geographical divisions : The Han Valley^ the Si-an Plain 
or Wei Valley, and the Northern portion. The C.I.M. pioneers^ 
Messrs. F. W. Bailer and George King, entered the province in 1876. 
By 1882 every city in the province had heen visited. 

The C.I.M. now has 25 stations, 28 out-stations, 69 missionaries, 
73 native helpers, 9 heing unpaid, and 648 communicants. 

CJ.M. Superintendent — G. F. Easton 

In Southern Shen-si the Mission^s stations number 6, and 
among these there have been 4<8 baptisms din:ing the past 
year. Adding the 4 baptized at Mei Hsien in Mid Shen-si, it 
gives a total of 52 in the C.I.M. stations of the province. 

Hsing^-an. — Mr. and Mrs. Burgess have welcomed a new 
worker in Miss Pearce from Australia. Most of her time has 
necessarily been given to the study of the language, but she 
has been able to join Mrs. Burgess in visiting, and to do a 
little in the way of teaching some girls who come to the 
house. Mr. Burgess has been holding some interesting 
evening meetings for boys, winning their attendance and 
interest by a little drill, games, and singing, and following 
up the opportunity by teaching God's Word. Mr. Burgess 
and the evangelist have kept up the preaching in the street 
chapel and have never wanted for a good audience ; but the 
Mission is still unable to report any spiritual ingathering in 
this station. 

In the Han-chong Prefecture the best progress, as was 
also the case last year, has been in Si~hsiang. 

26 



/\- r- 



K..L;v' I. 



TILDEN lOwN... tj:,3 
R L 



J 



THE PROVINCE OF SHEN^SI 27 

Si-hsiang. — In this district 31 of the 52 baptisms 
mentioned above took place, the same number as were 
baptized last year. Miss Harrison has persevere with the 
Girls^ School, and not without encouragement, both as 
regards educational progress and spiritual results. An 
epidemic, during whicn most of the girls were ill and one 
(Ued, brought a time of extra strain and anxiety upon our 
sister, especially as it came at the time when she had a class 
of Christian young men in for five weeks^ Bible study. The 
helpers in this station, only one of whom is a permanent 
paid helper, have been most energetic through the year, 
taking their turns in conducting meetings at some of the 
distant out-stations on Sundays, assisting in the street- 
chapel preaching, and conducting a sort of house-to-house 
visitation among the hamlete and farmsteads immediately 
surrounding the city. Early in the year Miss Phillips had 
to leave the station on account of bad health, but Miss 
Edwards from Australia has since joined Miss Harrison 
there. Most of her time has been occupied with study of the 
language, but she has helped as she has been able, especially 
in attending to the ailments of the people who come for 
medicine. 

Yang^-hsien. — ^The staff of workers here remains as last 
year. Four have been added by baptism to the little 
company. Miss Batterham is seeking to get hold of the 
children, numbers of whom she succeeds in attracting to her 
meetings for singing and text repeating, the successiul ones 
receiving picture cards. She is hoping in this way not only 
to influence the children, but possibly to reach the women 
through them. During the summer Miss Coleman spent 
some weeks at Hwa-yang, the out-station 20 miles north 
among the mountains. Mr. Easton recently passed through 
this place and met two of the Christian women there. He 
was struck with the large number of people attending the 
market at this place, and the good opportunity it afforded 
for working the district. 

iCheng^-ku. — ^Mr. Carwardine has had his hands full of 
building matters. The presence of the white ant pest has 
involved an unusual amount of trouble at this place. 
Though the work has not grown numerically, there are 
indications of it being in a healthier condition. The Chinese 
helpers connected with this station have all been removed by 
death or other causes, only a Biblewoman now remaining. 



28 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

The presence of a single brother to help follow up work at a 
distance would be a great help, and probably soon lead to 
blessing and increase. 

Mien-hsien. — Mr. and Mrs. Gould have been encouraged 
by the addition of two by baptism. Mr. Gould has procured 
a shop front for preaching at Tsai-yuen-tsi, a large market 
town 10 li from the city, where he gets good audiences, the 
people being willing to listen longer than he is able to 
preach to them. 

Han-chung. — At this station, 11 have been added to 
Church by baptism, while many newly interested persons iare 
regularly attending the Sunday meetings. In February a 
helpful Conference was held, 80 Christians attending from 
the country around and other stations in the district, the 
most distant coming from one of the Si-hsiang out-stations 
four day"*s journey away. The meetings lasted three days. 
On the Sunday the chapel, which holds 400, was filled, 
and 120 sat together to remember the Lord Jesus in the 
breaking of bread. The preaching at the street chapel has 
been maintained with very little break bjj the evangdist 
Yang, an occasional volunteer, and our missionary brethren. 
They never want for willing hearers, and many appear to 
take a real interest in what they hear, some of whom are now 
attending the Sunday meetings, and we trust may soon take 
their stand as decided Christians. 

The workers have had no means of following up the country 
work this year, so that no progress has been made in that 
respect. The Boys^ School has done as well as could be 
expected, considering it has had very little help from foreign 
teachers. 

In the spring Mr. and Mi*s. Moodie left for furlough, and 
Mr. Parsons removed to Lao-ho-keo in August. Mr. Lewis 
reached this station in the summer, and is making good 
progress in the language and giving valuable help in the 
preaching. Mrs. Easton keeps her various classes going for the 
women and girls. The Sunday School is still kept up, all the 
men^s classes being taught by natives, but witn the present 
dearth of ladies^ help Mrs. Easton has to have all the women 
together in the schoolroom. The Sunday School is found very 
valuable for familiarising the Christians with the historical 
facts of Scripture. Mr. Easton reports that he was glad to 
be able to visit the three stations in Mid Shen-si recently. 



THE PROVINCE OF SHEN-SI 29 

Feng^-siang^. — ^While there are no baptisms to report, 
the workers have been encouraged by a better attendance at 
the meetings and the manifestation of a spirit of greater 
interest. Rooms have been taken in some neighbouring 
towns for settled work. 

Mei-hsien. — ^The Church here consists of 39 members, 
4 of whom were baptized this year ; but there are 100 or 
more attending the meetings on Sundays. There is an out- 
station at Fu-feng-hsien, where an evangelist, partly supported 
by the Church, resides. None have been baptizea there yet, 
but several interested ones meet on Sunday with the 
evangelist. Another evangelist does good work at the 
various large m€u*ket towns in the district. The Boys^ 
School at this station is very small and gets no foreign help. 
Mr. Middleton and family left for furlough in the spring, 
leaving Miss Wright in charge ; later on Miss Lyle joined her, 
but owing to serious illness has since had to be taken to 
the coast, so that Miss Wright, quite a young worker, is 
alone again. She has started a few week-day meetings, which 
the natives appreciate. Opium refuge work is being tried 
at this station : the men^s work, under the care of a native 
brother, has given a measure of encouragement; but the 
women's work, under Miss Wright's care, is too new to be 
able to speak about yet. 

Cheo-chih was last year reported of as being practically 
abandoned, but now it must be classed among the stations 
again, as an effort is being made to restart the work there. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robinson are appointed to the station, and a 
house has recently been rentea for their residence; but as 
they have not yet moved into the place or commenced 
work there, there is nothing to report. 



The Scandinavian China Alliance 

Long^-chow. — ^The Sunday services have been well 
attended, great interest being shown by the people. The 20 
scholars in the school have made good progress. Regular 
house-to-house visitation work has been accomplished, and 
country work with book-selling undertaken. Eighteen 
persons have broken off opium, in addition to others receiving 
medical help. 



30 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

Klen-yang^. — Miss Jensen has been obliged to give most 
of her time to the study of the language, while Miss Nordin 
has devoted herself specially to house-to-house visitation. 
New premises have been obtained, which, when repaired and 
the chapel opened, will greatly assist the work. 

Pin-chow. — For the first part of the year the work was 
carried on at San-shui, but that centre will hereafter be 
worked as an out-station. The people at Pin-chow have 
been showing considerable interest, the chapel, which seats 
over 100, being filled. 

Kien-chow. — ^The work here has been more encouraging 
than formerly, the services being well attended. Two Bible 
Classes for 10 days each were attended by about 20 persons, 
and three Native Conferences have been held. Thirteen 
persons have been baptized during the year, while house-to- 
house visitation has been carried on. In the street chapel 
the attendance has varied from 100 to 200 persons, and the 
outlook of the work is hopeful. 

Wu-kong^. — Seven persons have been baptized during 
the year, and the school with its scholars has made good 

Erogress. In one village a house has been given for the 
olding of public worship, and 19,000 cash contributed for 
the building of a new chapel. 

San-kia-chuang. — The attitude of the people here has 
greatly changed, they have been much more friendly than 
in the past. One man has given three acres of land for the 
building of a chapel, and another has given 100 taels, and 
others smaller sums. An old house which was bought for 
the sake of its material was pulled down, and the material 
brought into the city by the people, free of ch€u*ge. A new 
chapel has already been built. Two persons have been 
baptized. No reports have come to hand from Li-chuen and 
Hsing-ping. 

Si-an Fu. — Concerning the work at the west suburb 
there has been encouraging progress. Twenty-eight persons 
have been baptized. Of the 75 persons baptized from the 
commencement, there are still 56 in Church fellowship. 
There are also about 100 inquirers. Regular meetings are 
held in 4 villages, and 2 Christians have been out for seven 
months preaching and selling books. Some 200 persons have 
received medical help, and the schools with their 45 pupils 



THE PROVINCE OF SHENSI 31 

have made good progress. Eleven of these scholars have 
been baptized. 

In tne city itself the business work has been conducted 
and services held on Simday ; seminary buildings have been 
erected by Messrs. Jensen and C. J. Andersen. 

Ying-kia-weL — Here the interest has been greater than 
in past years, the Simday services being well attended, and 
on market days the chapel, which holds over 200, being well 
filled. Five persons have been baptized, the ordinary station 
work, such as itinerations, schools, etc., being continued ; 73 
villages have been visited. 

Chen-kia-kou. — ^The work here with its three or four 
sei*vices every Sunday has continued. The attendance on 
Simdays has varied from 30 to 100, about 50 coming to the 
Sunday School. Nine persons have been baptized, and a week's 
Bible School held at one of the out-stations. Forty villages 
have been visited, some of them many times, and two col- 
porteurs have been busy selling books. 

Lan-tien. — ^The work here has been superintended mainly 
by a Chinese evangelist, who has been visited by Mr. and 
Mrs. Anderson. There are about 40 inquirers. 

Lung-chu-tsai. — No report has been received. 



THE PROVINCE OF SHAN-SI 

Area, Sl^SSO square mileSf or considerably larger than 
Scotland and Ireland together. Poptdatian, 1S,S009456, 
nearly three times as many as Portugal. 

The province of Shan-si (West of the Hills) was the ancient seat of 
the Chinese people. It gives promise of a great future. According to 
Richthofen there are alx>ut 13^500 square miles of coal-fields in this 
province. 

The first C.I.M. missionaries reached the province in November 1876^ 
shortly before the terrible fiimine of 1877-78. During 1900^ 113 
missionaries and 46 missionaries' children suffered martyrdom in this 
province. Of these^ 47 missionaries and 16 children were connected 
with the C.I.M. 

The C.I.M. now has 30 stations^ 82 outrstations^ 96 missionaries, 
184 native helpers, 82 being unpaid, 1849 communicants. 



C.I.M, Superintendent — Albert Lutley 

During the year this province was considerably disturbed 
by Secret Societies, but the immediate and drastic measures 
adopted by the officials quelled what might have been a 
serious rising. It is a cause for much thankfulness to Gk)d 
that during this time the Christians were practically 
unmolested. The abolition of the time-honoured system 
of education has brought considerable dismay to the students, 
many being like men groping in the dark without a guide. 
To meet the present demand it is hoped that it will be 
possible ere long to establish a summer normal school for 
the better training of the Christian teachers. The teachers 
will be expected to pursue a definite course of study, and 
present themselves for examination eveiy six montlis. It 
IS al^ hoped to establish a central school for promising 
Christian lads, to qualify them for teachers or for positions of 
influence. 

The failure of the crops has raised the price of grain from 

32 



THE PROVINCE OF SHAN-SI 83 

50 per cent to 80 per cent, and the outlook, aggravated by 
the extensive growtn of opium, is far from promising. The 
year has also seen considerable local agitation against the 
British Mining Syndicate, while the branch railway which 
joins the Pekin- Hankow Trunk Line near Chen -ting Fu 
is being rapidly pushed forward to T^ai-yuan Fu. The 
merchants and gentry also contemplate other provincial 
railways. 

The abolition of the old educational system has dealt a 
heavy blow at the citadel of Confucianism, and has given rise 
to a spirit of inquiry which manifests itself in a more willing 
hearing of the Gospel message. The opportunity thus 
afforded for the widespread preaching of tne Gospel is of 
the utmost importance, for, if neglected, who can say when 
it will occur again. During the year 324 baptisms have 
been reported from Central and Northern Shan-si, which 
gives a total membership of 15S9 for the districts mentioned. 
In addition to this, there are about 1500 inquirers under 
instruction. The total native contributions have been 1233 
taels, or rather over an average of one Mexican dollar per 
member. 

Bible classes have been held in nearly all the stations, jand 
aggressive evangelistic work carried on in the country districts. 
In this latter work, special pi'ayer is asked for an able elder 
named Chang. During the year two large central churches 
have been opened at Hung-tung and Ping-yao, seating 400 
and 550 people respectively. Several smaller village chapels 
have also been mortgaged or purchased by the native Church. 
The late Pastor Hsi's Opium Refuge work imder Elder Hsii 
(just appointed pastor) has been maintained, 1100 men and 
women passing through these Refriges. The Opium Refuge 
workers have been encouraged by seeing about 150 families 
give up idolatry and profess faith in Christ during the year. 

The Provincial Church Conference held in May at Ping- 
yanff Fu marks a distinct epoch in the development of the 
work. This Conference was attended by over 30 foreign 
workers and 60 native delegates from all the Churches in 
Central, Eastern, and Western Shan-si. The tentative 
Church Constitution and Rules drawn up last year were 
reconsidered, and with some important amendments were 
definitely accepted by all the Cnurches represented. Im- 
portant decisions concerning co-operation in educational and 
evangelistic work were made. 



34 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

DiSTEICT NOETH OF THE GrEAT WaLL 

In this large district, worked by the Scandinavian 
Missionary Alliance in association with the C.I.M., there are 
4 stations and several out-stations. 

Pao-f^eo. — ^This station, which has been unoccumed since 
1900, was occupied in September by 2 workers. There are 
6 members and 7 inquirers, 14 patients have broken off 
opium in the Refuge, and some itinerant work has been 
done. 

Sa-la-ts'i. — During the year 11 persons have been re- 
ceived into the Church by baptism connected with the 
out-station of Shaxitsing. Twenty-eight persons have passed 
through the Opium Refuge at the central station, and 
111 at the out -station mentioned above. A dav school 
for boys with 30 scholars, and another for girls with 
9 scholars, and an orphan home with 48 children have been 
carried on. 

Feng-chen and Kwei-hua-cheng. — At the former place 
there have been good attendances at Sunday services, 7 persons 
being baptized during the year. The Church contrioutions 
amounted to Tls.38. Seventy-three persons have broken off 
opium in the Refuge, several of whom have professed their 
faith in Christ. New premises have been secured for the 
work. Kwei-hua-cheng has not been permanently reoccupied 
since 1900. 

DiSTEICT BETWEEN THE NoRTH AND SoUTH ArMS OF THE 

Great Wall 

Ta-tung^. — Daily preaching in the street chapel and 
evangelistic work in the surrounding villages have been 
maintained. The men's Opium Refuge and a school for 
Christian lads has been carried on. In one village where one 
of the martjnrs died in 1900, the martyr's parents, relatives, 
and fellow villagers all expressed their desire to be instructed 
in the truth. A man, whom Mr. Nystrom met in Kan- 
suh about two years ago, travelled about 700 miles to 
Ta-tung to see Mr. Nystrom and hear more of the Gospel. 

SOH-PING AND THE HuN-YUAN DISTRICT 

In this district, including the stations of Tso-yun and 
Ying-chow, the workers of the Swedish Holiness Union, 



THE PROVINCE OF SHAN-SI 35 

associated with the C.I.M., have had not a little encourage- 
ment and blessing. 

Hun-jruan. — ^The Lord has abundantly prospered His 
work here, 33 having been added to the Church by baptism. 
Bible classes at the central and out-stations were attended 
by about 50 persons, while at the two Conferences some 200 
persons were present. At the out-station of Chwang-wo the 
Christians have erected a large chapel, costing Tls.200. 

Soh-ping^. — Much evangelistic work has been done in the 
city and district, Mr. Anderzen and the evangelist having 
visited every shop. They were well received, and found a 
ready sale for the Scriptures and tracts. The attendance at 
the Sunday services has improved, but the work is uphill. 

Tso-yun. — During the first half of the year Mr. Carlsson 
made this his headquarters for the general oversight of the 
work of the district, but removed in the autumn to Ta-timg, 
where more suitable premises were obtained. The native 
contributions have amoimted to Tls.44. Mr. Carlsson in 
his itinerations throughout the district has preached the 
Gospel in 10 walled cities and 151 towns and villages. 

The T'ai-yuan or Great Plain 

On this plain there are 12 walled cities and fiiUy 3000 
towns and villages. In 3 of these cities the Mission has 
stations, in connection with which there are 10 out-stations, 
where services are regulau'ly held, 6 having Opium Refuges. 

Ping-yao. — ^Bible classes have been held for the Christians 
and inquirers, covering a total of 133 days. Itinerant work 
has been done, a total of 200 days being spent by the foreign 
workers alone in the villages. Between 170 and 180 patients 
have passed through the Opium Refuges, some of whom are 
showing real interest in the Gospel. During the year a 
Memonal Chapel has been built in memory of Mr. and Mrs. 
Saunders*" children who died during their flight in 1900. 
There are about 130 inquirers scattered over 32 towns and 
villages. 

Hsiao-yi. — During the winter and spring, 3 villages 
were visited weekly, the Christians gladly assisting in this 
work. Many fairs, including the annual city fair, have been 
centres for aggressive preaching of the Gospel, while visits 



86 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

have been paid to the districts of Yong-ning and Ning- 
hsiang, where there are a few Christians and inquirers. 
There have been 5 baptisms during the year. 

Chieh-hsiu.— Faithful and persevering work in this 
formerly most discouraging district has at last been rewarded. 
The services are better attended and interest in the Gospel 
has increased in both the city and villages. Systematic 
village work has been engaged in, while the first Church 
Conference was held during tibe year, attended by about 76 
persons, when 14 persons were baptized. Mr. Chin, whose 
faithful services are being blessed at this centre, was set apart 
as an elder. The Conference expenses were met by the 
Christians, who also contributed Tls.ll towards Church 
expenses, and Tls.7 towards the British and Foreign Bible 
Society, About 125 persons have passed through the Refuge, 
which work has opened doors into new villages, 7 of the 
baptisms being the direct result of this work. 

Western Hill Disteict 

In this district-there are 3 stations with 18 out-stations. 

Si-chow. — In the early summer Mr. and Mrs. Shindler 
returned to this centre, and have been enabled to accomplish 
much valuable work, though not enjoying good health. 
Bible classes have been held both in the city and in one of 
the out-stations. It is a matter for much thankfulness that 
the work of the out-station at K'*eh-ch'*eng has shown signs 
of revival. 

Ta-ning^. — ^Last year the deaths of Pastor Chang and 
Miss Rasmussen were reported from this station, the death 
of Pastor Chii taking place shortly after. Pastor Chii, being 
a good Chinese scholar and having exceptional gifts as a 
preacher, has been much missed, his death oeing a loss to the 
province as well as to the local Churches. Miss Gauntlett, 
though alone during part of the year, carried on the work 
until she had the joy of welcoming the Misses Carr and 
Hunmrbun. Two Bible classes were held at this centre by 
Mr. Knight, lasting about a week each. In addition to the 
regular school work, several villages have been visited weekly. 
Eight persons have been baptized, giving a membership of 
142. One of the encouraging features of the work is the 
large proportion of young men in the Church. 



THE PROVINCE OF SHAN-SI 37 

Chi-chow and Hsiang-ning. — ^On the death of Pastor 
Chii, Mr. Yang, who had been in charge of the work at 
Chi-chow, decided to return home, and, while supporting 
himself by his farming, give such time as possible to the 
Church. This he has most faithfully done, and his place 
at Chi-ohow has been taken by another Christian named 
Tien, a worker of many years' experience. The station has 
been visited by foreign workers during the year. At Chi- 
chow the work is in a satisfactory state, and at Hsiang-ning 
the cause is prospering. About 50 persons have broken 
off opium, and the spiritual growth of the Christians in the 
village is gratifying. 

PiNG-YANG Fu Plain 
Commencing from the south-west comer we start at-^ 

Ho-tsin. — ^The most noticeable feature here is the steady 
progress of Christian inj9uence, extending in family circles, 
parents bringing their children, and children inj9uencing their 
parents. Thirteen have been added to the Church by baptism, 
while there are about 20 promising inquirers. Many fairs 
and villages have been visited by the Christians, while house- 
to-house work has been done m the city and other places. 
About 60 patients have broken off their opium habit in the 
Refuge. At the out-station Kih-shan faithful laboiu: has 
been accomplished by the native in charge. Only a few 
patients have entered the Refuge at Eiang-chow. 

The work at Wen-Hsi, which has for many years been 
unfruitfiil, has during the year taken a decided change, about 
30 or 40 regularly attending the Sunday services, while 
90 persons have passed through the Refuges. 

Chii-wu. — In consequence of Mr. and Mrs. Triidinger 
leaving for furlough in May, the Misses Hoskyii and Tippet 
went to this centre, for the Girls^ School and for the stations 
in the surroimding district. The school opened with 26 
girls and 15 boys. In the Girls^ School about half of the 
expenses, and in the Boys^ School about two-thirds, are met 
by the native Church. The scholars^ food and clothing 
are also provided by the parents. Soon after the Girls' 
School was opened, the Christians contributed Tls.46 for 
school purposes, thus manifesting a large interest in the 
work, the Church only numbering 43 members. One of 
the teachers of the Boys' School and the matron of the 



88 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

Girls'* are both voluntary helpers. On account of chance 
of workers, baptisms have been^deferred. ^ 

Real blessing has come to this Church during the year, 
the Holy Spirit having been received in fuller measure by 
many of the members. Many of them have been broken 
down in humility and self-abasement as they have confessed 
their sins and sought forgiveness. Five persons have been 
added to the Church by baptism, while there are 12 
inquirers on the list. There have been two half-yearly 
gatherings, at which the average attendance was 80 persons. 
Two Bible classes have been held, and the Christians have 
given voluntary €issistance in Gospel preaching in the 
villages. 

Ping-yang^ Fu. — ^The year has been one of steady advance, 
in spite of the transfer of the Misses Hoskyn and Tippet, 
and several native helpers, to other centres. Nine nave 
been baptized, and S lallen members restored. Six Bible 
classes have been held for men, and 6 for women, at which 
considerable diligence and interest have been shown, and 1 
central and 2 village Conferences have met during the 
year. The contributions for school and evangelistic work 
have amounted to about Tls.25. For five or six months 
of the year the Church supports one or two evangelists. 
Medical work has been carried on by Mrs. Lyons, while the 
Bible School has had an average of 6 students for the 
foiu: months. In addition to the Bible School held here, 
Mr. Knight has held 10 station classes throughout the 
province, averaging 7 or 8 days each, at which the average 
attendance has been about 20 persons. 



HUNG-TUNG AND HuO-CHOW DISTRICT 

Hung-tung. — One of the prominent events of the year 
has been the opening of a large central church in May, 
which will seat about 500 persons. The opening services 
were so well attended that it was necessary to have special 
and separate meetings for the non-Church members. On the 
second morning of the Conference 96 confessed their faith 
in Christ by baptism. In November a similar gathering 
was held at Chao-cheng, an out-station, where very suitable 
premises were secured last year. These have been thoroughly 
renovated and definitely set apart for the Lord's work. 
About 600 Christians gathered for the Conference, all 



Till' >: 
PUBLIC . 



ASTOR, ].!;:■'•] , ) 

TILDEN l'0LNJA'ii(3.\S 
R i 



r 



1 



THE PROVINCE OF SHAN-SI 39 

the expenses being practically provided for by the Christians 
themselves. The meetings were marked with more than 
usual power and the manifest presence of the Lord, a number 
definitely promising to pray until the Lord graciously poiured 
out His Spirit upon tne Church in China. Seventy-tluree 
were added to the Church by baptism, and several backsliders 
I'estored. The contributions given and promised amounted 
to over Tls.100. This Conference was followed by a 
month^s Bible School. After these classes, the Church officers 
met for two days of prayer and conference about future 
developments of the work, and two of their number were 
definitely set apart for visiting and instructing the villa^ 
Christians, ana these will be supported by the Churdi. 
Seven men were elected to the office of deacon, and three as 
elders, while Elder Hsii was asked to become pastor to the 
Churches in the western part of Chao-cheng district. 

About 450 men and women have passed through the 
Opium Refuges, one of the results being that several new 
villages have been opened to the Gospel, and about 100 
families are known to have given up idolatry and professed 
faith in Christ. Space will not permit reference to the 
earnest evangelistic efforts of the native Christians. The 
total native contributions for evangelistic and Church work, 
exclusive of the money given for school purposes, have been 
Tls.703, or about .£100 in English money. 

Huo-chow. — Several new villages have been open to the 
Gospel during the year, and more than 100 visits to the 
villages been made by the workers. Fifty -two women 
attended the classes for Bible instruction, most remaining 
for about 20 days. Over 100 persons broke off their opium 
habit in the Refuges ; while the Boys^ School has been moved 
into the city at the earnest desire of the Christians them- 
selves, that it might be under the direct control of the lady 
workers. There are 16 pupils in the Boys' School, and 43 
in the Girls'" School, whicn schools show good progress. Both 
schools are self-supporting. A very suitable shop has been 
secured on the main street, as a street chapel and book room. 

Yoh-yang. — ^The spiritual life of the Church here has 
been quickened, and the annual Conference was a season 
of much blessing. Although there have been no additions 
to the Church, the work has not been without encouragement. 
Services have been regularly held both in the city and one 
of the villages. 



40 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

The Eastern Hills District 

Yii-wii. — Mr. Lawson, assisted by a band of voluntary 
helpers, has visited both local fairs and markets and many 
of the cities in the surrounding district. In the spring the 
chief official satisfactorily broke off his opium habit, and 
in gratitude for the help received he offered to bear the 
expenses of opening a Renige in the city, to assist the poorer 
people. This plan has been carried out, but not many have 
availed themselves of the opportunity. Fourteen persons 
have been baptized during the year, while over Tls.28 have 
been contributed for evangelistic and Church purposes. 

Lu-cheng. — In addition to the city work, many of the 
villages in this and adjoining districts have been visited. 
Five persons have been baptized during the year, and 1 
member restored. 

Lu-an Fu. — ^The work at this centime has been prosecuted 
with vigour, and there has been not a little to encoura^ the 
district as a whole, however, still remaining largely un- 
responsive to the Gospel message. Six persons have been 
baptized during the year. The street chapel has been open 
daily throughout the year with few exceptions, while a band 
of m)m 15 to 16 worKers, divided into four groups, imited 
in the evenings to engage in preaching of the Grospel. The 
spiritual tone of the school, witn the 19 scholars, has been good, 
while several have professed conversion, the lads having a 
meeting of their own every evening, which they lead in turn. 
Each scholar pays Tls.2| per year K>r tuition, and provides his 
own food and clothing, the Church meeting all the other 
expenses, except books and half the teacher^s salary. During 
the year 28 persons have passed through the Opium Refuge, 
some of whom seemed interested in the Gospel. 

THE SWEDISH MISSION IN CHINA 
In Association with the CI.M. 

The work of this mission, though carried on in the three 
provinces of Shan-si, Shen-si, and Ho-nan, is here referred to 
as a whole. 

The work of this mission was threatened during the year 
by the uprising of dynastic and anti-foreign sects, but the 
prompt action of the officials prevented serious trouble. 



THE PROVINCE OF SHAN-SI 41 

At Tung-chow Fu, Shen-si, an organised Tent Mission 
has been in operation, the workers going from place to place. 
Similar work has been carried on in the Han-cheng district 
by Mr. Bergling. Two colporteurs have been busy through- 
out the whole year in the I-shi district, while voluntary 
evangelistic effort has been made round about Hai-chow. 
In the station situated in the province of Ho-nan similar 
work has been engaged in. 

The aggregate number of those attending the Sunday 
services connected with this mission is about 600, or an 
average of 75 to each station. Classes for systematic Bible 
study have been held at various centres, and many of the 
Christians have memorised portions of Scripture. The 
mission has a large boarding-school for girls in each of the 
three provinces in which it labours, as well as two smaller ones. 
There are also 7 boys^ schools. In February a school for the 
training of evangelists and school teachers was opened. One 
hundred and eleven patients passed through the Opium Refuges 
connected with this work; but while this has been found 
profitable, the need for a doctor has been much felt. 

During the year 108 persons have been baptized, 31 
in Ho-nan, S9 in Shen-si, and 48 in Shan-si; the total 
number now standing at 382, with 300 inquirers. One 
elder has been appointed, and 4 deacons, and the total 
contributions of the Church amounted to Tls.207. Con- 
ferences have been held at all of the stations. 

In closmg the report of this province, the workere, while 
thankful for much blessing, exoress their deep longings for a 
larger manifestation of the Holy Spirit^s power and working 
in their midst, the records of His work in Wales and other 
places inspiring them with the prayer that He will do more 
for them. Shall we not pray that it may be so ? 



THE PROVINCE OF CHIH-LI 

AR£Ay 116,800 square miles^ or the same as Austria. Popula- 
tiouy 20,937,000, or nearly/ equal to Austria, 

The province of Chih-li (Direct Rule) consists of two portions^ that 
north of the great wall^ which is thinly populated chiefly by Tartar 
tribes^ and that south of the wall^ which is thickly peopled. 

The C.I.M. commenced work in this province in 1887. The stations 
opened are largely used as bases for work farther inland. In 
1900^ of the thirteen missionaries and four missionaries' children who 
suffered martyrdom^ three adults and two children were connected 
with the C.LM. 

There are now in connection with the C.I.M. 4 stations, 12 out- 
stations, 11 missionaries, 20 native helpers, and 82 communicants. 

Tien-tsin. — ^This busy and rapidly growing port is also 
the business centre for tiie Mission^s work in North China. 
Here Mr. and Mrs. G. Clark reside, giving hospitality and 
assistance to the missionaries on their journeys to and from 
the interior. Only those who know the difficulties of deal- 
ing with the coolies who congregate at this place, with its 
railways and wharfs, can appreciate the good work done here 
in helping the missionary on his travels and in the forward- 
ing of his goods and money to the interior. 

Hv7ai-luh. — The workers here have been much en- 
couraged. The mutual division of the field has limited the 
work of this station to the ten Hsien districts Ijdng to the 
west of the Peking-Hankow Railway; the districts on the 
east of the railway being handed over to the American 
Board and the L.M.S. In six of these ten districts out- 
stations have been opened, making thirteen out-stations in 
all, where regular Sunday services are conducted. In those 
districts which have been jointly worked from Hwai-Iuh and 
Shun-teh, twenty-eight persons were baptized in July, while 
three were received into the Hwai-luh Church in September. 

At the station classes held for twenty days in February, 

42 



THE NE^V YOliK 

PUBLIC LlBUAilY 



TILDCK lOi:NDATlQNS 
R ^ 



THE PROVINCE OF CHIH-LI 48 

eighiy-five men I'eceived ten days of Bible instruction. 
Numerous itinerations have been made in the district, and 
twenty-five patients helped in the Opium Refuge during the 
spring. This station being on the highway to Shan-si, 
nfty-six missionaries have been entertained going and coming, 
ana about 1000 packages of luggage forwarded. The new 
railway into Shan-si, which is in course of construction, will 
soon make these two latter items unnecessary. More than 
700 names have been enrolled on the inquirers' list, the 
majority of whom are unable to read, and S5,000 cash have 
been contributed, in addition to the local expenses of the 
small chapel, which have been met by the Christians. 

Shun-teh. — During the year three men have been bap- 
tized, making the total membership of this Church fifteen 
persons, eleven men and four women. The attendance at 
worship has not been large, not more than ten coming 
regularly, and the Church contributions have, owing to some 
dissatisfaction in the allocation of former contributions, been 
smaller than before. At the Opium Refuge at Nan-ho 
thirty-five patients have been treated, with the result that 
six persons have given in their names as inquirers. Mr. 
Griffith assisted Mr. Green at his Bible School at Hwai-luh, 
Mrs. Griffith holding Bible classes for women during the 
first month of the year. The women's work has been 
reinforced through the appointment of Mrs. Botham to this 
station. 

Hsuan-hua. — ^This station is worked by the Scandinavian 
China Alliance^ whose work is referred to on page 34. 



THE PROVINCE OF SHAN-TONG 

ArbAj 55,970 square mUes^ or more them twice as large as 
Greece. Population^ 38,247,900, or considerahlt/ more than 
that of Italy, 

The province of Shan-tong (East of the Hills) is poor and densely 
populated. The Germans r^;ard it as their sphere of influence in 
China. It has the three valuahle harbours of Chefoo^ Wei-hai-weij 
and Kiao-chow. 

The C.I.M. commenced work here in 1879^ when a sanatorium was 
established. Subsequently English schools were opened^ chiefly for the 
benefit of the missionaries children. 

The C.I.M. has only 2 stations in this province^ Chefoo and 
Ning-hai. In connection with these there are 1 out-station^ 45 mission- 
ariesj 10 native helpers^ 2 being unpaid^ and 109 communicants. 

The SchooL — The school is divided into three depart- 
ments, namely, the Boys\ Girls\ and Preparatory, each under 
its own principal. During the year the general health both 
of teachers and pupils has been good, there having been no 
serious epidemic of sickness. 

The number of passes at the College of Preceptors 
examination was creditable. And there is also cause for 
thankfulness to God for spiritual blessing amongst the 
children. 

Owing to the absence of two or three members of the 
staff the pressure upon the teachers has been severe, and Mr. 
Prank McCarthy, the Principal of the Boys' School, has 
suffered in health in consequence. This strain has now been 
relieved through the return of Mr. and Mrs. E. Murray, and 
through the welcome arrival of new workers in each depart- 
ment. Special prayer is asked for these members of the 
Mission who devote their lives not only to the tuition and 
discipline of the children, but also to their spiritual and 
moral welfare. 

A substantial and much-needed addition has been made 
to the playground, and it is intended, as the Lord supplies 

44 



THE PROVINCE OF SHAN-TONG 46 

the funds, to erect a gymnasium for the use of the boys, a 
kind friend having akeady pix>mised the internal fittings when 
the building is erected. 

The total number of pupils has been slightly over two 
hundred, and there continue to be gratifying indications that 
the schools are appreciated not only by the members of the 
Mission, but by tne vdder missionary circle both in China and 
Japan, as well as amongst the merchants and others in the 
Far East. 

Owing to the situation of the schools, it is necessary that 
they should have their own arrangements for the supply of 
food and other necessaries. 

TTiis important department, under the care of Mr. T. 
Willett, the school secretary, has been prospered during the 
year, whilst Mr. E. Tomalin, the missionary in charge, has 
continued to be responsible for the often difiicult work of 
supplying efficient Chinese servants, and for the upkeep of 
the buildings. 

Sanatorium. — ^The work here began by establishing a 
sanatorium for sick missionaries, and the late beloved 
Director, the Rev. J. Hudson Taylor, was led to do this 
through his own recovery to health and strength as a result 
of a stay hei*e in the home of kind Christian mends in 1879. 
Ever since then the Mission has had some of its members 
here, and great numbers have been restored to the work in 
health and strength through a change to this bracing seaport. 
Many members of other missions have also been thankful 
to obtain accommodation and hospitality at the C.I.M. 
Sanatorium. 

But the work of this station has never been without a 
direct effort to i*each the Chinese with the Gospel. Not even 
here would it be seemly for a mission to forget the one end 
and purpose of its existence, the evangelisation of China, and 
we trust the character of the members of the Mission vdll 
always be such that they could not be in China and not be 
seeking to bring the Gospel to the people of this land. 

Native Work. — ^Tbe native work has resulted in the forma- 
tion of a goodly Chiurch, and many have been baptized here 
through God'^s blessing on the evangelistic efforts put forth. 

There is a resident pastor and missionary in cnarge (Mr. 
E. Tomalin), and a large congregation gathers for wor- 
ship every Sunday morning. The accommodation has been 
enlarged three times during the last six years, but is again 



46 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

taxed to its utmost limits, and a larger building is necessary. 
On Sunday afternoons there are two Sunday Schools — one for 
the boys of the native Day School, and one for adults. The 
attendance at the adult Sunday School has grown, and ranges 
from 70 or 80 at the worst, and from 110 to ISO or more at 
the best. There are week-night meetings for prayer and 
Bible study, and a week-day meeting for women, which is well 
attended. Mrs. Andrew Wright has kindly stepped into the 
breach caused by the departure of Mrs. Williams and Miss 
Blackmore, who did such faithful work amongst the women 
attending the church. A permanent lady worker for this 
branch is very much needed. 

There are two good native evangelists, whose time is fiilly 
occupied. 

The Day School for Chinese boys contains over 60 boys, 
and has the services of 2 teachers. This work is earned 
on independently of Mission funds. 

There is also an Industrial School for women and girls who 
otherwise could not be got to attend school. They give the 
morning to study, and the afternoon to drawn thread-work, 
etc. Tne articles made are sold to help support the school. 
Undoubtedly a great deal could be done to make mission 
work self-supporting by developing industrial mission work, 
but it needs workers specially called and trained for it. 

The 'Lily Douthwaite Memorial' Hospital site has been 
removed to a convenient situation in the large compound, and 
it is hoped that the new buildings will prove more satisfactory 
than the old ones. The hospital and dispensary work has 
grown very much during the last few years. In 1904 the 
number of dispensary visits, in-patients, and operations reached 
A grand total of 17,493 ; in 1906 the grand total reached 
SSf^SS — an increase of 6746. Daily preaching is carried on 
in the waiting-room. The native contributions to the work 
for all purposes amounted to the sum of $61*36 (Mexicans), 
^ual to £6 : 7 : 10 sterling. It must not be overlooked that 
in the previous year the native Chinxih made a special effort 
to piux;hase lana for a Christian cemetery, and raised alto- 
gether the sum of $294-36 (Mexicans) or dfiSO : 13 : 3— not a 
small sum when it is remembered that the yearly income 
of these poor people only averages from £6 to £9 per 
annum and out of this they have to keep themselves and 
their families. 

There were no additions to the Church by baptism during 



Til': NlW YOI^K 

PUDLIC LIBllAIIY 



ASTO:i. U:.()\. AND 



THE PROVINCE OF SHAN-TONG 47 

the last year, but the work was not without its encouragement 
in smte of trials and disappointments. 

The total number of communicants on the Church roll at 
the end of 1906 was 90. 

Rev. F. W. Bailer, who is engaged in literary work, and 
has just translated Pastor Hsi into Chinese, has given very 
welcome aid by taking a shai*e of the preaching at the Sunday 
morning services and oy taking charge of the Sunday School 
for boys. 

Ning-hai Chow. — In connection with Chefoo there is the 
station of Ning-hai Chow, distant 20 miles to the eastward. 
This work is also under the care of the missionary in charge 
at Chefoo. 

The death of Mr. Tomkinson has been a great loss to the 
work of this station, but since his death Mrs. Tomkinson has 
continued to carry it on with another lady missionary. Miss 
Hancock is indefatigable in her work amongst the women 
of the city and surrounding villages, and in spite of physical 
weakness Mrs. Tomkinson continues perseveringly in the work 
of the station. There is an Industnal School for girls here, 
and Torchon lace is made in Nottingham thread and in native 
silk thread. The girls are able to earn enough for their 
board, and something more if they are industrious. The 
mornings are given to study, and the afternoons to work. 
Mrs. C. H. Judd, who formerly lived in this station — in fact 
the station was opened and the work founded by Mr. and 
Mrs. C. H. Judd, — ^has been the kindest helper in this work. 
Without her aid it could not have been carried on as it has, 
for we are indebted to her for her unceasing labours in selling 
the products of the schooPs industry and thus providing us 
with the funds for its continuance. In 1904 eight of the girls 
of this school gave evidence of conversion and were baptized, 
as was also one woman, mother of one of the girls. During 
1905 there have been no additions to the Church by baptism, 
but 3 members have been excluded, and 3 suspended from 
fellowship. Some thousands of copies of the Gospel have been 
sold in Ning-hai and the villages during the year. Like all 
other parts of the field, this place too is sadly needing 
additional workers. 



THE PROVINCE OF HO-NAN 

Arba^ 67)940 square mUes^ or nearly the same as the State of 
Missouri. Population^ 35,316,800, or considerably more than 
that of England and Wales combined. 

Ho-nan (South of the River) is a fertile and populous province. 
The first missionary journeys to be made in this province were 
undertaken by Mr. Henry laylor of the C.I.M. in 1875^ but it was 
not until 1884 that a permanent footing was obtained^ when premises 
were rented at Chou-kia-kou. The capital^ Kai-feng Fu^ the last 
provincial capital to be opened to the Gospel^ was not opened until 
1902. In 1900 many of the mission premises were destroyed^ but no 
lives were lost. 

The C.I.M. now has 15 stations, 57 out-stations, 49 missionaries, 
125 native helpers, 33 being unpaid, and 1042 communicants. 

Chou-kia-kou. — ^The year was commenced by a fort- 
night's special evangelistic effort, which has had good results. 
At the Annual Conference some 300 or 400 persons were 
present, but owing to the inclement weather the baptisms 
were postponed until the following spring. There are twelve 
out-stations connected vdth this centre, situated in the four 
counties, two having been added during the year. At 
several of these branch stations Christian Endeavour 
Societies have been formed. 

At Yao-tse-teo, where the chapel was burned down by 
opponents, a new and larger building has been erected at a 
cost of 30,000 cash to the local Church, the gi*ound being 
given by the leader. 

At Ri-fii good premises have been rented by the inquirers, 
and at Hwa-chuang 48,000 cash have been subscribed to 
build a chapel. At Ku-siang the leader has had to be 
suspended for interfering in lawsuits. The total of the 
native contributions has amounted to $195. During the 
year Mr. and Mrs. Shearer left for furlough, and sickness 
also compelled Mr. TuU to leave. 

48 



THE PROVINCE OF HO-NAN 49 

Yen-cheng. — Two men have been baptized at this 
station during the year, while there are nine promising 
inquirers, of whom only one is a woman. The average 
Sunday attendance is about fifty, though at times the 
number has reached a hundred. Many outsiders have been 
brought in contact with the Church through coming to the 
dispensary, which is open once a week. Aggressive evangel- 
istic work has also been undertaken both by the preaching 
and selling of the Word at the many fairs around this centre, 
and by the daily preaching in the street chapel. 

In the surrounding country Miss Cream has found many 
open doors, and the Misses Andersen and Argento have 
assisted in so far as they have been able to spare time from 
the city. 

Mr. Lack was engaged for part of the summer in the 
building of a Sanatorium on the Chi-kong Mountains for 
the use of workers in this province. These mountains are 
situated on the borders of Ho-nan and Hu-peh. 

Si-hwa. — During the early days of the New Year the 
Church was visited by days of refreshing from the presence 
of the Lord, the Sunday attendance increasing from fifty 
to a hundred persons, many of whom came regularly. As 
the small class-room was not sufficient to hold half the 
women who came to the women^s class, this had to be held, 
for some months, in the yard. The Boys' School, which 
Miss Smith had started at the commencement of the year 
with eight scholars — all the children of Christian parents, — 
increased in the same way, and the workers were especially 
rejoiced by the baptism of ten women in September. At a 
Bible School held by Miss Wilkins nine women attended. 
Among the developments of the year was the starting of a 
Christian Endeavour Society, which now has over forty 
members. In view of the increase mentioned above, it is 
gratifying to report that during the autumn the workers 
were able to enlarge their premises. 

The evangelist also reports that he has had better times 
than he can ever remember in the matter of selling books 
and preaching the Gospel in the Yamen enclosure. His 
sales amounted to over 2300 portions of Scripture and 129 
whole Bibles. At the central station the avei^age attendance 
has been sixty, while at five out-stations three have had an 
average of forty, and two of fifteen persons, services, how- 
ever, being held at two other places during bad weather. This 

E 



60 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

pleasing condition of progress has been tested, and in some 
measure checked, by thi'eatening placards which were pasted 
up in different parts of the city. 

Chen-chow. — At the central station, which has a chapel 
to accommodate 150, the average attendance has been 130. 
During the Spring Festival in the city about 11,000 men 
and women heard the Gospel, while hundreds of students 
were spoken to when up for the three yearly examinations. 
There are about forty hopeful inquirers, and fifty other 
persons attending the services irregularly. In the school 
there are 11 scholars, and 200 patients have been treated 
in the dispensaiy. There has been an increase in knowledge 
and useful service on the part of the Christians, and marked 
growth in grace among the inquirers. Classes for the 
training of native helpers have also been held periodically. 
At the out-station of Sin-chan, situated on the river Sha, 
fourteen miles south of Chen-chow, there is a chapel to 
accommodate sixty, with an average attendance of thirty 
persons. The rent of the chapel is partly defrayed by 
the Christians, and the services are conducted during the 
week by a local member, and on a Sunday by a paid helper 
from the central station, the voluntary^ leader Hsii having 
recently removed to Ri-fu-tsih, some eight miles distant, 
where he has gathered together a congregation of about 
twenty persons. 

At Tang-li-ri, a small market village fourteen miles to 
the north-east, there is a chapel to seat forty persons, with 
an average attendance of twenty-six. The progress here has 
been somewhat slow. Work is carried on at three other 
places, which will doubtless develop. At one of these, Hwai- 
tien, a large walled city, thirty miles to the south-east, three 
women have burned their idols, and it is estimated that some 
6000 persons heard the Gospel during the visits of the 
district preacher and Biblewoman. The work at this 
station is in charge of Dr. and Mrs. G. Whitfield Guinness, 
in the absence of Miss Leggatt and Mrs. Talbot, who are on 
furlough. 

Tai-kang. — The two chief events of the year have been 
the arrival of Mr. Bird to assist in the work, and the 
Autumn Conference. This Conference is memorable by the 
attendance of the local Mandarin and ofiicials when the 
subject of Christian citizenship was discussed ; by the com- 
plete breakdown of many at the first evening meeting when 



THE PROVINCE OF HO-NAN 61 

a powerful address on the Cross of Christ was given by the 
Chen-chow evaneelist ; and by the promise of 100,000 cash 
towards the needed new buildings. 

Nineteen persons have been baptized during the yeai*, 
giving a total membership of 77, with 75 promising inquirers 
and ^x)ut a hundred other interested persons. Ijbe average 
attendance at worship in the city has been 130, with about a 
hundred persons at the six out-stations. The total con- 
tributions have been $180, not including the promises for 
the new church buildings. Among the special evangelistic 
efforts of the year may be mentioned the work at seven large 
fairs, and twenty-one lantern lectures in the court-yard, when 
from 300 to 400 persons attended each time. A new out- 
station has been opened at Kao-kiao, and premises rented at 
Chi Hsien, about forty miles away, the funds bein^ privately 
given. Special reference should be made to the valuable help 
given by Deacon Koh, who is a voluntary helper. 

Kai-feng Fu. — Substantial progress has been made in 
all departments of the work aunng the year, and two 
new movements have been instituted, a Preaching Society 
organised by the men, and an Anti-foot-binding Society 
organised by the women. These movements were the 
outcome of a Conference held at the beginning of the New 
Year, when many subjects, such as family worship, ancestral 
worship, foot-binding, etc., were considered. 

The building in which the services are held is capable of 
seating a little over a hundred persons, and while this has 
been at times taxed to the utmost, the average attendance 
has been about sixty. Eight men have been baptized during 
the year, most of whom are inquirers of more than two years' 
standing. Among them was one who heard the Gospel 
thirty years ago, and another a prominent idol-maker in 
the city. The Church-membership numbers eleven, with 
twenty-one inquirers, while the contributions of the Church 
have amounted to twenty taels. 

Seven Hsien cities and many other market towns and 
villages have been regularly visited by the missionaries and 
colporteurs, the latter having travelled between 700 and 800 
miles and sold 4894 Gospels and tracts. 

In connection with the medical work, a site has been 
purchased, after considerable difficulty, for the new hospital, 
in the south suburb of the city, and the foundations were 
laid in July; Dr. Cox from Chin-kiang superintending the 



62 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

building of these premises.^ With Dr. Cox's presence there 
has been a distinct increase in the operations, and the 
development of the medical work, so recently begun, will be 
seen by the following tables : — 

Out-patients^ 1904 men^ 1105 women^ 371 

„ 1905 „ 2548 „ 800 

Operations^ 1904 ... 23 

„ 1905 .110 

Total patients, 1905—3348. Total, 1904—1476. 

Hsiang-cheng. — In connection with the work at this 
centre, settled work is carri^ on in four cities, Hsiang-cheng, 
Yii Chow, Hsii Chow, and Yeh Hsien, while periodical visits 
are made to six other cities, Lu-shan, Ru Cnow, Pao-feng, 
Eia Hsien, Mi Hsien, and Chang-koh, and itinerations in 
their surrounding districts. Steady progress is reported, 
fourteen having been added to the Church by baptism, while 
two who had to be excluded for growing opium have since 
repented. The native contributions show a pleasing increase. 
In 1902, with a membership of seventy-five, the contributions 
amounted to <f 1 : 12 : 6 ; in 1903, when the membership was 
the same, the contributions wei'e £9, : 5s. ; in 1904, although 
there was a slight decrease in membership, the contributions 
had advanced to ^£^5 : 6 : 3 ; while in 1905, with a membership 
of eighty- two, contributions reached the sum of £S : 1 : 3. 
A large proportion of this yearns contribution has been given 
to the >fative Missionary Society, which provides the travel- 
ling expenses of the students on their evangelistic journeys. 

Dunng the year the first converts have been received at 
each of the out-stations, -and a Christian Endeavour Society 
has been started. In the Opium Refuge for men, opened during 
the year, twenty-five patients have been cured of their opium 
habit, while some three hundred persons have been treated 
for this vice, in their own homes, with good results. A Boys'* 
Boarding and Day School has been commenced, half the 
expenses being paid by the Chinese Christians, and among 
the scholars two have been baptized and five received as 
inquirers. Four men ai-e being trained as evangelists, while 
at the dispensary, under Miss Soltau^s charge, 900 patients 

^ The erection of these premises was commenced with funds specially con- 
tributed by some generous friends, though the sifts will be quite inadequate 
to complete all that is needed. A generous gift nas also been received for the 
building of a house for Dr. and Mrs. 6. Whitfield Guinness. 



THE PROVINCE OF HO-NAN 58 

have been treated, the Gospel by this means finding its way 
into many distant farms and hamlets. The sales of literature 
amount to 1S8 whole Bibles and Testaments, 677 portions, 
and 9811 tracts. 

Chin-tze-kwan. — The workers here are steadily con- 
tinuing in the preaching of the Gospel, Mrs. Parker being 
encouraged by a better attendance on the part of the women. 
Considerable difficulty has been experience by the coming of 
Roman Catholics into the district. 



THE PROVINCE OF KIANG-SU 

Area, 38,600 square miles, or a little larger than Portugal. 
Population, 13,980,235, or more than that of MeoAco. 

This province takes its name from the first syllable of its two 
leading cities^ Kiang-ning Fu (commonly called Nan-king) and Su-chow 
Fu. 

Mr. Hudson Taylor commenced work in this province in 1854^ and 
from the formation of the C.I.M. the headquarters of the work have 
been at Shanghai. The C.I.M. Training Home for lady workers is 
situated at Yang-chow. 

The C.I.M. now has in this province 6 stations^ 7 out-stations^ 55 
missionaries^ 21 native helpers, 5 oeing unpaid, and 154 communicants. 

Shanghai. — To adequately i*eport the multitudinous 
activities connected with the work of the Mission which 
are carried on here would take more room than these pages 
will allow. In the general direction of the work oi the 
Mission, the administration of its finances on the field, 
the arrival and departure of workers and the dealing with 
the business orders and luggage of the many workers in the 
interior, there is of necessity an immense amount of work. 
Earnest prayer is asked for €dl the members of the China 
Council (composed of the Superintendents of the various 
provinces), who, so far as circumstances will allow, meet 
once a quarter, but especially for Mr. D. E. Hoste as General 
Director, and the Rev. J. W. Stevenson, Deputy Director in 
China, and those associated with them. The mass of im- 
portant correspondence constantly arriving from the inland 
stations and also from the various home centres, and the 
many conversations with the workers wKo come down from 
their stations for consultation, involve unceasing strain and 
heavy pressure upon the Genei-al Director and those who 
assist him there. At this time, when Mr. Hoste is absent 
from China, the duties of Mr. Stevenson become the more 
onerous and pressing, and make it the more important 

54 






i . 



:y 



ASTc:!, ],i:nox. and 

TILl)i;X iOi;NDATIONS 

11 I 



THE PROVINCE OF KIANG-SU 66 

that, while earnest prayer is made for Mr. Hoste, who as 
Greneral Director is visiting some of the home centres, the 
hands of Mr. Stevenson and Mr. Stark, the Secretary, should 
be strengthened by constant remembrance at the Throne of 
Grace. 



THE NORTH KIANG-SU OR GRAND CANAL DISTRICT 

Superintendent--- A, R. Saund£bs 

This district, with the exception of the treaty port of 
Chin-kiang, is all north of the river Yang-tz, and covers 
about one-third of the total area of the province. It is a 
very densely populated region, containing many large walled 
cities and busy market towns. Of these wfl,Ued cities the 
Mission has work in 7, and regular church gatherings in 4 of 
the market towns. Of the more than 300 missionaries of all 
Societies in this province, only 40 are north of the river, 
the C.I.M. having 26 of this number. Throughout this 
district the circulation among the Chinese Christians and 
inquirers of the little prayer card, « O God, send a Revival, 
etc*," has done much to promote the spirit of prayer for 
revival. Commencing the review from the north, we start 
at— 

An-tung. — ^This station has 4 out-stations, where services 
are held eachN Sunday, the aggregate attendance each week 
being about 100 in the out-stations, and varying from 70 to 
100 in the city. Of the 57 Church members, 24 were bap- 
tized during the year, while there are about 40 hopeml 
candidates for baptism. This is by far the most encourag- 
ing work of the whole district, and there is much indeed for 
which to praise God. 

Miss Reid, through her medical work, has gained entrance 
into one of the largest residences in the district. The ladies 
of the house have paid frequent visits to the Mission house. 
Much of the medical work is now done by a Chinese assistant, 
under Miss Reid's supervision. Miss G. Triidinger has spent 
a considerable part of the year itinerating in a district in the 
North-East, where she has opened an out-station in the large 
market town of Sin-an Chen, although the agitation caused 
by the effort of a Western Power to open Hai-chow as a port 
gave rise to a considerable disturbance for a time. Miss E. 
Triidinger has given much of her attention to the district 



66 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

where most of the Christians live, and has visited eight 
different centres repeatedly. In that neighbourhood there 
are three places of worship, which the native Christians have 
themselves provided. Special classes for the instruction of the 
leaders, etc., have been held here by Mr. and Mrs. Saunders. 

Ts'ing-kiang-pu. — ^The work here has been much hindered 
through the enforced absence of the workers caused by 
sickness. Miss Waterman left in the early summer for 
furlough, while Miss Robson became so seriously ill that Miss 
Weber was obliged to take her to Chin-kiang for medical 
treatment. It is good to report that, during the time the 
station was without a missionary, the natives carried on all 
the regular meetings, and it is gratifying to learn that several 
Christian lads have met regularly each week for prayer. 
During the past two months the work has been under the 
care of Dr. and Mrs. Shackleton. 

Kao-jru. — This station is still without a resident mission- 
ary, but the Sunday services have been carried on by Chinese 
helpers fix)m Yang-chow. 

Yang-chow Fu. — ^This centre comprises two cities, called 
the "new'' and the "oW cities. There are two district 
magistrates, one ruling over one part of the city and a 
district called Kan-ts'uen Hsien, and the other ruling over 
another part of the two cities and a rural district called 
Kiang-tu Hsien. There is a station in each of the cities, and 
the work is separately organised. 

Yang-chow New City (Pi-shi-Kiai).— The Church at 
this centre was organised by the late Rev. J. Hudson Taylor, 
who baptized the first converts. Although much prayer has 
for many years been offered for this centre, the harvest has 
not been abundant. Considerably over two hundred converts 
have been baptized since the commencement, but many of 
these have been transferred to regular work in other districts. 
At present there are only 16 members in the new city Church, 
but there are about 20 inquirers. Thirteen meetings or 
classes are held each week, with an aggregate total of about 
170 to 200. In addition to the regular station work, ex- 
tensive itinerations in the surrounding country have been 
made, when between 18,000 and 19,000 Testaments, 
calendars, and sheet tracts were sold. The work at the 



THE PROVINCE OF KIANGSU 67 

out-station of Tai-chow — ^a street chapel there being rented 
with the native Church contributions — ^has given much en- 
couragement, the first convert being baptized during the 
year. 

The ladies^ Training Home is also situated in this centre 
(the new city), where Miss Murray, the Lady Superintendent, 
and those associated with her devote their time and energies 
to the assistance of the newly arrived lady workers. The 
maintenance of Miss Murray'^s health and the continuance of 
her helpful influence at this important post are causes for 
sincere gratitude to God. 

Yang-chow Old City (South Gate). — Miss A. Henry 
has for long carried on the work of this centre single-handed, 
but during the year God has given her a devoted fellow- 
worker in Mrs. Shapleigh. Although there have been no 
1)aptisms during the year, there has been much faithful work 
accomplished. At the out-station Tai-hsiang, about 40 miles 
distant, the work is most hopeful, but a rising of the people 
in protest against excessive taxation cut short Miss Hennr^s 
last visit, when she had hoped to enrol several candidates for 
baptism. During this riot the buildings of the new college 
of Western education were destroyed. In several towns and 
surrounding villages there are hopeful inquirers, some of 
whom have suffered persecution, while the leading families 
of the city, including that of the magistrate, are on visiting 
terms with the missionaries. 

Chin-kiang. — At this treaty port the Mission has a 
sanatorium and a hospital for the Chinese. During the 
year no fewer than 15,067 patients were treated, the work 
being under the charge of Dr. and Mrs. Williams, during 
the absence of Dr. Cox, who has been superintending the 
building of the new hospital at Kai-feng Fu, the capital of 
Ho-nan. Much of the Chinese work is done by Dr. Tsiang 
(a former student of Dr. Cox), who, having an extensive 
practice of his own, gives his services gratuitously. His 
father. Pastor Tsiang, is also a voluntary helper, and has been 
appointed Pastor during the past year. Miss Bradfield, in 
addition to her women^s work, has a school, with an average 
attendance of 14. 

Mr. Saunders, as missionary superintendent of this district, 
has spent about five months of the year away from his home 
in Yang-chow, visiting the various stations in the district and 



58 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

engaging in evangelistic efforts. He and Mrs. Saunders have 
also held special services, such as Bible classes, etc. The need 
of a Provincial Boarding School for boys, where the children 
of the Christians throughout the district may get a Christian 
education, is much felt. Parents will provide one-half of the 
cost of maintenance ; and the workers are now pra}dng 
definitely that God will supply the needed funds, and a 
missionary to take charge. 



THE PROVINCE OF Sl-CHUAN 

4rea^ 218,480 square miles^ or considercMy larger than Fraiice. 
Population, 68,724,890, or approaching twice the population of 
France. 

Si-chuan (The Four Streams) is the largest province of China proper. 
The province was visited hy Dr. Griffith John and Mr. Wylie in 1868^ 
but no effort was made to gain a permanent settlement in the provinces 
for Protestant missions until the C.I.M. commenced work in the 
province in 1877. 

The Church of England section of the C.I.M. works east of the 
Kia-ling river (North-East Si-chuan)^ while the other members of the 
Mission work to the west of the same dividing-line. 

The C.I.M. now has in the province 26 stations^ 111 out-stations^ 
105 missionaries, 162 native helpers, 29 being unpaid, and 1976 com- 
municants. 



EASTERN Si-CHUAN DISTRICT 
C.I.M. Superintendent — ^Bishop W. W. Cassels 

llie absence of Bishop Cassels from China on furlough 
throughout the year 1905 has resulted in the reports from 
this district being incomplete. He reached China again on 
January 7, 1906, but the long journey up the Yang-tz 
would not allow him to reach his district in time to make 
himself acquainted with the details of the work at the various 
centres and send in his report before this book is published. 

From the statistics received it is evident that the progress 
is of a most gratifying character. The following figures will 
show at a glance the advance made during the last lew years : — 





1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1906. 


Mission Chapels 


. 15 


88 


45 


57 


Baptisms in year 


. 104 


148 


288 


272 


Total Communicants 


. 445 


584 


834 


1072 



59 



60 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 



I. Pao-ning Prefecture 

Pao-ning. — The work here has passed through a time of 
trial, through the removal of several workers. Dr. Shackle- 
ton^s illness necessitating the closing of the hospital, and 
the death of the Rev. A. Lawrence (C.M.S.), who had 
charge of the Diocesan Bible-Training Institution for native 
evangelists, bringing that work to a close for the present, 
there being no one able to carry it on. 

The church in the city, which seats 300 persons, is 
regularly crowded, though there has not been much progress 
in the city work generally. There are some fine Christians 
among ti^e scholars in the four schools, and the school work 
is felt to be especially profitable. One native helper, who 
has been entirely supported by the Church, has been engaged 
in itinerant work. 

The out-station work has given encouragement, two more 
centres being opened during the year, making a total of eight, 
and more could be done, did workers allow. In one little 
hill centre 200 persons meet every Sunday, these being 
assembled from the surrounding country. Mr. Aldis reports 
the joy of having baptized 80 catechumens. 

Kuang^-yuan. — ^The regular station work connected with 
schools, dispensaries, and house to house visiting has been 
continued during the year, there being, for instance, five 
classes during the week days and two on Sundays in con- 
nection with the Boys'* School, and six classes during the week 
and two on Sundays in connection with the Gins' School. 
About 150 persons regularly attend the services, the seating 
accommodation being 160. 

Sin-tien-tsi. — ^At this hill station there are 68 Church 
members, with 17 inquirers, about 100 persons attending 
the services with some measure of regularity. The chapel 
will seat nearly 200 persons. Twenty weekly classes are held 
by the lady workers here, apart from the Sunday services, 
and visiting the homes of the people, and out-station work. 

Nan-pu. — The regular attendance at services here has 
been good, 34 persons having been received as catechumens 
during the year, of whom 15 have been baptized. Special 
efforts have been made by the Christians to reach the many 
country persons who constantly pass the Mission premises. 



THE PROVINCE OF SI-CHUAN 61 

about 150 persons attending these meetings specially held on 
market days. 

11. Shun-king Prefecture 

Shun-king. — Illness and building have necessitated the 
limiting of work in a very large degree to the city. As the 
church accommodation has been insufficient, a new church 
has been in course of erection. Fourteen persons have been 
received by baptism, 8 in the city and 6 in the out-stations, 
while S2 liave been i*eceived as catechumens. 



III. Hsu-ting Prefecture 

Hsii-ting Fu. — ^During the absence of Bishop Cassels on 
furlough, the Rev. Arthur Polhill had much of his time 
occupied in visiting a number of the stations. Miss Drake 
has been actively continuing her work among the women. 

The absence of pressure in hospital work has allowed 
Dr. Wilson to devote more time to his wQrk connected with 
the science room, which has brought many thousands of 
persons under the sound of the Gospel who otherwise would 
not have come near the Mission premises. As a means to 
reach the students he regards this as eminently successful, 
he having got into close touch with the students from sur- 
rounding cities. 

ITie Girls' School has been giving encouragement, part of 
the women''s hospital having to be used to supply the needed 
accommodation. Dr. and Mrs. Wilson have also at their 
private expense built a little Home on a hill some two hours 
distant from the city, for the use of those missionaries who 
visit them from time to time for needed medical or dental 
treatment. During the year. 111 in-patients have been 
treated, of whom 82 came for the cure of opium. The 
majority of these were men, only 6 women being among 
the total number. 

WEST SI-CHUAN DISTRICT 

CLM. Superintendent — Dr. Paery 
Assistant Superintendent — Joshua Vale 

Chung-king. — In addition to the business work in which 
Mr. H. Broomhall is engaged, the other workers have devoted 



62 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

all their time and energy to the Church. The meetings have 
been better attended than previously, the average attendance 
on Sunday mornings being about 150. The Simday Schools, 
where adults as well as juniors assemble, have given encourage- 
ment. There are three large classes for men, two and some- 
times three for women, and three for children. The quarterly 
reviews of the lessons taken in the Simday School show that 
good work is being accomplished. It has unfortunately been 
necessary to discipline seven members, but although no 
advances have been made during the year, it is hoped some 
will be baptized ere long. Considerable attention has been 
given to the Ki-kiang district, Mr. Curtis making this his 
centre for itinerant work. There are about 20 scholars 
both in the Boys^ and Girls^ Schools, though the lack of a 
suitable teacher in the former has been detrimental to its 
success. The surrounding coimtry, which with its markets, 
etc., gives wide scope for work, calls for moi*e attention than 
the workers have yet been able to give it. 

Kiang^-tsin. — ^There is a Church membership here of 
14 men, of whom 4 are at the out -station of Chu- 
kia-to. The Sunday services have been well attended, the 
average being about 100. Preaching in the street chapel 
has been regularly sustained, and well attended in the 
evenings, voluntary service being rendered in this work by 
some of the Christian men. Mr. Squire and his native 
helpers have been frequently itinerating over the district, 
especially visiting the three places where meeting-halls have 
been opened. iTiese places all need much cautious super- 
vision, that what is genuine may be nourished, and wrong- 
doers checked. A preaching colporteur, Mr. Ren, is con- 
stantly traversing the district, so that many are getting to 
know of the Gospel. Owing to Mrs. Squire's absence the 
women's work has been in abeyance. 

Siao-shi. — ^The workers have kept up regular visitation 
of the district, and made frequent stays in the out-station of 
Ho-chiang Hsien and the village of Wang-lung. At the 
central station the Sunday services have kept about the 
same, with an attendance of about 25. One addition 
has been made to the Church in the baptism of a lady of 
good family in the country, who is a true Lydia, being most 
pronounced in her profession of faith, and zealous in her 
study of the Bible, which she loves. She is, we believe, 
shining brightly in her home, and we trust her husband will 



THE PROVINCE OF Sl-CHUAN 63 

eventually follow her example. He has given up the opium 
habit, and, at the time of tne Bible Society Centenary, sent a 
donation of 100 taels to the Society. Mrs. Li herself gave 
a gift of 10 taels from the sale of one of her gold ornaments^ 
to help in renting a preaching-hall on the street of Siao-shi. 

In the out-station of Ho-chiang Hsien the work has been 
made more uphill by reason of Roman Catholic opposition. 
The securing of more suitable meeting -rooms has greatly 
helped the attendance at the evening Gospel preaching. 
The meetings begun last year in the city prison are still 
continued, and the Christian jailer, Mr. Fu, still holds 
steadily on his way. 

Lu-chow. — ^The work of overseeing, and organising, and 
shepherding the little groups of believers in some 25 
out-stations, and in Lu-chow itself, has been carried on 
faithfully and perseveringly by Mr. James and his fellow- 
workers, the general result bieing quiet, steady progress. 
The additions during the year have been 16, and the 
present membership is 131 for the district. In the central 
station the Sabbath attendances have kept up well, the 
average being about 150 men, women, and scholars. The 
usual weekly classes and Church meetings have been con- 
tinued, and afternoon and evening preaching daily, all the 
year, in the two preaching-halls, one inside the city, and 
one attached to the Mission premises, and a full share of this 
service has been rendered by native brethren. Very large 
numbers in the course of the year are reached by this constant 
preaching of the Gospel message. The Boys' and Girls' 
Schools have been continued through the year with a total 
average attendance of 40 scholars. The band of native 
preachers have continued their faithful services in the district. 
Several of the little groups of Christians in the out-stations 
are at present in the process of securing their own meeting- 
places Tby purchase, which absorb most of their present 
efforts at self-support. The total native contributions in 
this district amoimt for the year to about 800 taels. 

A nice roomy chapel with other accommodation has been 
completed at Kiang-an Hsien, one of the older out- 
stations ; a large proportion of the cost has been raised by 
the Christians. In the whole district there are about 350 
pei'sons who are recognised as under instruction. 

Fu-shun Hsien. — The workers have continued at their 
posts through the year, with the exception of a break caused 



64 CHINA. AND THE GOSPEL 

by the riot in May, at which time the ladies retired for a few 
weeks to Lu-chow. Mr. Tsen has been a valued voluntary 
helper as elder in charge at Siao-chi, the sub-centre which 
has the largest membership in the district. Mr. Liang has 
also worked faithfully as helper in the Fu-shun centre, and 
has been supported by funds raised by a native Evangelisa- 
tion Society. In the central station the work has been 
hampered for want of suitable premises. A very extensive 
advertising of the Gospel has been done by pasting tracts in 
all the market towns of the Hsien, and in addition a large 
circulation of tracts and Scriptures by colporteurs has been 
effected. The Church membership in the Fu-shun district 
is 185. The recognised inquirers number about 250, and 
attendants at meetings about 400. At present the pro- 
portion of women members is insignificant ; in many of the 
places the accommodation is such that the attenaance of 
women is not practicable. There ai'e, however, very cheering 
openings in the womerfs work, especially in Fu-shun itself, 
wnere the workers have regular classes for the women once 
on week days and on Sabbath mornings. The baptized 
members are resident in twelve places, each of which has a 
meeting-room, rented and supported by the natives. There 
are, besides these, seven other places where inquirers meet, 
but which as yet have no baptized members, l^e proximate 
figure for all native contributions for rents, schools, support of 
native helpers, etc., amounts for the year to about 100 taels. 
The work in this as well as the Lu-chow district is widespread, 
and involves incessant travelling and constant care and 
prayerful toil to give anything like regular visitation and 
teaching. There is great need for more efficient native 
ministry. 

Sui-fu. — ^The Church work at this centre has gone 
on steadily. There have been 21 added to the Church 
by baptism in the city and out-stations. Boys^ School and 
Dispensary and preacning-hall have all been well sustained 
— the school with average attendance of 30 boys. The 
plan of a week's evening preaching during the full moon week 
of each month has been followed, and good attendances have 
been the rule.- The Sunday services have kept up with a 
regular and full attendance of members and inquirers, but 
not by any large numbers of the public. The total Church 
contributions amount to $307. The Lan-chi Hsien out- 
station Church is the oldest and best organised in the Sui-fu 



THE PROVINCE OF SICHUAN 65 

district, and has neat and convenient premises recently 
purchased. There are twenty smaller places which are off- 
shoots of the Lan-chi Church, and the work gives promise of 
growth and expansion. The Lan-chi Church lost one of its 
earnest members by drowning in the tenible flood of August. 
The other members have done well in raising relief funds. 

What with some local disturbances, bad seasons, and 
serious flood, when 2000 houses in the city were flooded, the 
conditions of work have been trying, many members suffering 
both loss of home and goods. In two districts the members 
have purchased a chapel and handed over the same to the 
Mission. The total contributions of the year have amounted 
to S370, which includes the sums contributed for the upkeep 
of local places. Three thousand patients have been treated 
during the year, and 30 scholars taught in the Boys^ 
School. At this centre with its out-stations there are 103 
members, 21 having been baptized during 1905. 

Kia-ting^. — ^The evangelist has continued his faithful 
services by visiting the out-stations, and assisting -in the 
central Church when Mr. Ririe is absent. The day school 
has been superintended by Mrs. Ririe, and the school teacher 
has acted as superintendent to the Sabbath School. The 
Sunday services are well maintained, and the recent adoption 
of Christian Endeavour methods has proved a stimulus to 
the Church. 

Tan-lin. — ^The work here has gone steadily forward under 
the care of Pastor Wang, the present Church membership 
being 88. About two -thirds of the pastor's suppoi-t is 
obtamed from a native endowment fund. The pastor was, 
more than twenty years ago, only a water-coolie and imable 
to read. He has overcome his natural disadvantages, and 
is now a trusted fellow-worker in the Gospel and a helper 
of many. The Church at Tan-lin is now being able to 
supply helpers for the work in several other centres. 

Mei-chow. — At this station with its important out- 
stations there has been a good deal of encouragement, 
especially at Pen-shan. The year closes with a membership 
for this group of out-stations of 160 men and women, and 
some 200 regular probationers. Pen-shan Church has now 
the benefit of better accommodation, the property consisting 
of a chapel and side rooms for native helpers, and several 
shop fronts on the street which yield a little rental. 

F 



66 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

Chiung^-chow. — ^The present total membership at this 
station with its out -stations is 55^ and the regular 
visitation of the country work has resulted in signs of 
progress. The Sunday services have been well attended, and 
the women's work encouraging. 

Kwan Hsien. — ^Mr. Hockman, who has been obliged to 
give a fair portion of his time to study and care of the out- 
stations, has aimed rather at shepheraing the work left by 
IVIr. Hutson than initiating fresn developments. Quite a 
little has been done in the way of dispensing medicine, 
but none of those assisted show much desire for a knowledge 
of the Gospel. The refusal to interfere in law-suits has 
resulted in some, whose motives were false, not continuing 
in their professed spiritual inquiry. 

Chen-tu. — From March to December Mr. and Mrs. 
Grainger were absent from their station at the coast. The 
work, however, has gone on quietly with the other workers 
much as before, there being some fresh tokens for encourage- 
ment. In August, Mr. and Mrs. Vale left for furlough, so 
that the station has for some part of the year been left in 
the charge of Mr. Franck. Preaching in the gospel hall 
has steadily continued, and a weekly inquirers' class with an 
average attendance of 16 men has been held in addition to 
the usual Church meetings. During Mr. Grainger's absence 
the Bible Training School was suspended, but steps are now 
being taken for the renewal of this work. 

Ta-chien-lu. — The Church work has given encourage- 
ment, there being wider opportunities than in the past. 
There are 12 members in the Church. These are Chinese 
business men who are engaged in business with Tibetans. 
Mrs. Sorenson has commenced a class for women, some of 
them being half-castes between Chinese and Tibetans ; while 
Mr. Sorenson has a class for boys. The members have been 
contributing freely towards the expenses, but no exact figures 
are to hand. 



66 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

Chiung-chow. — ^The present total membership at this 
station with its out -stations is 55, and the regular 
visitation of the country work has resulted in signs of 
progress. The Sunday services have been well attended, and 
the women's work encouraging. 

Kwan Hsien. — ^Mr. Hockman, who has been obliged to 
give a fair portion of his time to study and care of the out- 
stations, hais aimed rather at shepherding the work left by 
Mr. Hutson than initiating fresn developments. Quite a 
little has been done in the way of dispensing medicine, 
but none of those assisted show much desire for a knowledge 
of the Gospel. The refusal to interfere in law-suits has 
resulted in some, whose motives were false, not continuing 
in their professed spiritual inquiry. 

Chen-tu. — From March to December Mr. and Mrs. 
Grainser were absent from their station at the coast. The 
work, nowever, has gone on quietly with the other workers 
much as before, there being some fresh tokens for encourage- 
ment. In August, Mr. and Mrs. Vale left for furlough, so 
that the station has for some part of the year been left in 
the charge of Mr. Franck. Preaching in the gospel haJl 
has steadily continued, and a weekly inquirers' class with an 
average attendance of 16 men has been held in addition to 
the usual Church meetings. During Mr. Grainger's absence 
the Bible Training School was suspended, but steps are now 
being taken for the renewal of this work. 

Ta-chien-lu. — The Church work has given encourage- 
ment, there being wider opportunities than in the past. 
There are 12 members in the Church. These are Chinese 
business men who are engaged in business with Tibetans. 
Mrs. Sorenson has commenced a class for women, some of 
them being half-castes between Chinese and Tibetans ; while 
Mr. Sorenson has a class for boys. The members have been 
contributing freely towards the expenses, but no exact figures 
are to hand. 



66 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

Chiung-chow. — ^The present total membership at this 
station with its out -stations is 55, and the regular 
visitation of the country work has resulted in signs of 
progress. The Sunday services have been well attended, and 
the women'^s work encouraging. 

Kwan Hsien. — Mr. Hockman, who has been obliged to 
give a fair portion of his time to study and care of the out- 
stations, hais aimed rather at shepheraing the work left by 
Mr. Hutson than initiating fresn developments. Quite a 
little has been done in the way of dispensing medicine, 
but none of those assisted show much desire for a knowledge 
of the Gospel. The refusal to interfere in law-suits has 
resulted in some, whose motives were false, not continuing 
in their professed spiritual inquiry. 

Chen-tu. — From March to December Mr. and Mrs. 
Grainger were absent from their station at the coast. The 
work, however, has gone on quietly with the other workers 
much as before, there being some fresh tokens for encourage- 
ment. In August, Mr. and Mrs. Vale left for frirlough, so 
that the station has for some part of the year been left in 
the charge of Mr. Franck. Preaching in the gospel hall 
has steadily continued, and a weekly inquirers^ class with an 
average attendance of 16 men has been held in addition to 
the usual Church meetings. During Mr. Grainger's absence 
the Bible Training School was suspended, but steps are now 
being taken for the renewal of this work. 

Ta-chien-lu. — The Church work has given encourage- 
ment, there being wider opportunities than in the past. 
There are 12 members in the Church. These are Chinese 
business men who are engaged in business with Tibetans. 
Mrs. Sorenson has commenced a class for women, some of 
them being half-castes between Chinese and Tibetans ; while 
Mr. Sorenson has a class for boys. The members have been 
contributing freely towards the expenses, but no exact figures 
are to hand. 



66 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

Chiung-chow. — ^The present total membership at this 
station with its out -stations is 55, and the regular 
visitation of the country work has resulted in signs of 
progress. The Sunday services have been well attended, and 
the women'^s work encouraging. 

Kwan Hsien. — Mr. Hockman, who has been obliged to 
give a fair portion of his time to study and care of the out- 
stations, hfius aimed rather at shepherding the work left by 
Mr. Hutson than initiating fresn developments. Quite a 
little has been done in the way of dispensing medicine, 
but none of those assisted show much desire for a knowledge 
of the Gospel. The refusal to interfere in law-suits has 
resulted in some, whose motives were false, not continuing 
in their professed spiritual inquiry. 

Chen-tu. — From March to December Mr. and Mrs. 
Grainger were absent from their station at the coast. The 
work, however, has gone on quietly with the other workers 
much as before, there being some fresh tokens for encourage- 
ment. In August, Mr. and Mrs. Vale left for ftirlough, so 
that the station has for some part of the year been left in 
the charge of Mr. Franck. Preaching in the gospel hall 
has steadily continued, and a weekly inquirers^ class with an 
average attendance of 16 men has been held in addition to 
the usual Church meetings. During Mr. Grainger^s absence 
the Bible Training School was suspended, but steps are now 
being taken for the renewal of this work. 

Ta-chien-lu. — The Church work has given encourage- 
ment, there being wider opportunities than in the past. 
There ai'e 12 members in the Church. These are Chinese 
business men who are engaged in business with Tibetans. 
Mrs. Sorenson has commenced a class for women, some of 
them being half-castes between Chinese and Tibetans ; while 
Mr. Sorenson has a class for boys. The members have been 
contributing freely towards the expenses, but no exact figures 
are to hand. 



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THE PROVIxNCE OF KWEI-CHOW 

Area^ 67,160 square mileSj nearly equal to Victoria 
(Attstraliay Population^ 7,650,282, or equal thai of Korea, 

Kwei-chow (Noble Region) is one of the poorest provinces^ though 
possessing considerable undeveloped mineral resources. Its mercurial 
deposits are of unequalled richness. There are probably from two to 
three millions of Aborigines in this province^ mostly south of the 
capital. 

The C.I.M.^ still the only Protestant Society at work in the province^ 
commenced work there in 1877. In 1898 Mr. W. S. Flemings the 
first C. I. M. martyr^ was murdered at Pang-hai. 

llie C.I.M. now has 6 stations^ 13 out-stations^ 24 missionaries^ 24 
native helpers^ and 279 communicants. 

Kwei-yang. — Owing to considerable difficulties, the 
Church here has been reconstituted during the year, some of 
the names being omitted from the Church roll. Of the 27 
Church members, only 18 were readmitted, though three of 
the others have since expressed repentance for their sin. 
There has been an improvement in the contributions, 32 taels 
being contributed for general Church expenses, and 55 taels 
towards the expenses of the Church Conference. 

At the out-station of Tong-chow the Sunday services 
have on the whole been fairly well attended. The chapel has 
accommodation for about 150 persons. An elder and deacon 
have been appointed at the Church half-yearly meeting. 

Chen-jruan Fu. — ^The year has been a quiet one and the 
people generally friendly. Considerable time has been given 
to itinerant work, visiting many cities at the time of the 
triennial examinations, which will probably be the last time 
for reaching many of the students in this way. The street 
preaching has also been found successful, and the guest-hall 
work particularly helpful. About 4000 persons have been 
treatea for minor ailments during the year. 

67 



68 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

An-shun. — The total number of those who regularly 
attend the services in connection with this station, the out- 
station included, is S74 persons, while about 200 come to the 
Sunday School. Among those who meet for worship, there 
are about 100 Miao. The total baptisms for the whole 
district number 128, and the workers have been much 
encouraged by signs of a considerable move, especially among 
the Aborigines. Hundreds of femilies are showing interest 
and meeting for worship at various centres. More than one 
thousand Miao met for worship at Eo-pu when Mr. Adam 
was present. A large chapel is being built at that place. 
The native contributions have amounted to Tls.293. 

Tuh-shan. — Eight persons have been baptized during the 
year, 'while the Church services have been attended by a con- 
siderable number of outsiders. At Ki-ch^ang a small house 
has been secured for the holding of meetings, a good part of 
the purchase-money being subscribed by members. Preliminary 
work has also been carried on at two or three other centres, 
but work in the country was at a standstill until the troubles 
in the province of Kwang-si were quiet. At Sui-p'o three 
persons have been baptized and a piece of land nas been 
secured for the chapel, while there is hopeful work opening 
up at other centres. During the summer special classes were 
held for the instruction of the Christians and inquirers. 

Tsen-i Fu. — ^The work at this station has been continued 
throughout the year without a break. In addition to the 
usual Sabbath and week-night meetings there has been a 
constant preaching of the Gospel both in street chapels and 
on the street. A shop has been secured in the old city and 
converted into a street chapel, which, in addition to its use 
for preaching, is useful as a centre from which the ladies can 
visit and more efficiently work that part of the city. The 
women's work has been helped by the addition of a Bible- 
woman. 

For six months of the year a dispensary was open in the 
mornings, an average of 15 to 30 patients being treated 
daily. Some successfiil midwifery work undertaken by the 
ladies has created a good impression. At Nei-tan Hsien, some 
50 or 60 miles away, a good work has commenced. A house has^ 
been rented there, and some 20 persons profess their interest 
in the Gospel. Several members of a family living next door 
to the Mission-house have professed sincere interest in the 
Gospel. 



THE PROVINCE OF KWEICHOW 69 

Pang-hai. — ^This station is a centre for work among the 
Aborigines, and has been the scene of much sorrow and trial. 
In 1898 Mr, W. S. Flemine and his Miao evangeUst were 
murdered, and in 1900 a number of the Miao converts suflFered 
martyrdom. Mr. Chenery, who was appointed there in 1904, 
was accidentally drowned during 1906 when travelling by boat. 
More recently Mr. R. Williams has taken up the work there, 
leaving his work in Yun-nan for this purpose. Special prayer 
is asked that he may be preserved from all evil and that his 
work may be blessed. 



THE PROVINCE OF YUN-NAN 

Area^ 146,680 square miles^ nearly half as large again as New 
Zealand, Population^ 12,324,574, or the same as Meocico, 

Yun-nan (South of the Clouds)^ previous to 1259 a.d., was ruled 
by native princes who were of Hindu origin. The fearful Mohammedan 
rebellion^ which terminated in 1870^ has left many parts of the 
province in ruins. There are probably over fifty distinct aboriginal 
tribes in the province. The average opium crop is almost equal to the 
total export nrom India to China. 

In 1876 Mr. J. W. Stevenson and Dr. H. Soltau saw Yun-nan from 
the Burmah border, but were not allowed to cross. In 1877 Mr. J. 
McCarthy^ the present C.I.M. superintendent, entered the province; 
but it was not till 1881 that the first station was opened by Mr. 
George Clark. 

The C.I.M. now has 5 stations, 23 missionaries, 5 native helpers, 1 
being unpaid, and 25 communicants. 

C.I.M, Superintendent — J. McCarthy 

Mr, McCarthy reports with thankfulness a year full of 
mercies, the workera being kept in peace and free from serious 
illness. The absence on mrlough of three families has made 
it a little difficult to keep all the departments of work steadily 
in progress; while two other workers who returned from 
furlough have been appointed to new districts — Mr. 
Williams having volunteered to fill Mr. Chenery's place in 
the work among the Miao, at Pang-hai, and Mr. H. H. 
Curtis being appointed to Chung-kmg. Mr. Sanders of 
Australia has been obliged, by family reasons, to defer his 
return indefinitely. Mr. A. G. Nicholls has been thankfully 
w elcomed back from furlough, as also a new worker, Mr. G. 
Porteous from Australia. Mr. Nicholls is carrying on the 
work left by Mr. Rhodes at the South Gate House in Yun- 
nan Fu, and Mr. Porteous is living with him, engaged in 
learning the language. 

Ping.yi.— The frequently recurring markets in the city 

70 






ASTOR, LEyO" 
TILDEN rOcN 



u . 



THE PROVINCE OF YUN-NAN 71 

and surrounding towns have been made the centres for 
energetic evangelistic work, though at present it is not possible 
to tabulate results. The numerous women visitors who came, 
at first from curiosity, to see Mrs. Hanna, are less frequent in 
their visits now, but it is hoped that the message of salvation 
then heard will yet bear fruit. One man has been received 
by baptism, who has heard the Gospel for many years, while 
two others were deferred. Mr. ana Mrs. Hanna have spent 
some months at Chu-tsing Fu, at the No. 2 House, to keep 
the work going, while Mr. McCarthy visited Yun-nan Fu 
and Ta-li Fu. By the gifts of the workei's in the station, 
premises on the main street have been secured, which will 
greatly facilitate the work. 

Chu-tsing Fu. — ^There has been an evident increase in 
the desire of the people to give heed to the things that are 
spoken. A number from one or two of the villages, and from 
the city, have shown real earnestness in attending Bible 
Classes and the ordinary sei'vices. Several have burned their 
idols, and some have given up smoking opium. Three men 
have been received by baptism at this station during 
the year. 

Through the whole year Miss Simpson has been alone in 
the Ladies^ House, as there has been no companion able to 
assist her in the work. Two Chinese ladies and a slave girl, 
who have long shown interest, continue to give evidence of 
their faith in the Lord Jesus. There are a number of women 
who appear to be quite convinced of the truth, but are 
prevented, by fear of their people, from joining the Church. 
Will some finends specially remember these in prayer ? 

At the No. 2 House one serious event of the year was a fire 
which burned the chapel and another block of buildings; 
however, we gratefiiUy record that the missionary's dwelling- 
house was not destroyed, though injured. The chapel has 
been rebuilt. Two women have been received by baptism, 
but the cold and careless behaviour of some of the Christians 
has given no little grief. Prayer is desired for the pastor, 
Mr. Kong, who has been sufiering with his throat. 

Yun-nan Fu. — Two men have been received into the 
Church by baptism at the South Gate. They have long 
been considered as truly converted, and they show earnestness 
in proclaiming the Gospel to others. The attendance at the 
chapel has oeen larger than formerly. The work at the 



72 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

North- West House is also continued, but it is cause of sorrow 
that some of those who have been put under discipline have 
not shown true repentance. A revival is prayed for. 

Ta-li Fu. — At the beginning of the year one man was 
received into the Church by baptism. The work has gone 
on satisfactorily both in the city and at Hsia-kwan, which 
has been visited weekly. Visits have also been paid to Hsieh- 
chow. The medical work has been carried on without inter- 
ruption, and a good many have been cured of opium-smoking. 
The faithful services of the active helper Yang have been a 
cause for much thankfulness, and several, by regular attend- 
ance, inspire the hope that a real work is taking place in 
their hearts. During Mr. McCarthy's visit at this station, 
Mr. Embery was free for an itinerant journey, when a good 
number of Dooks were disposed of. 

Dr. Clarke has treated 2878 patients during the year, ol 
whom 780 were women. These people have come from about 
fifty different centres around Ta-li Fu, so that by this means 
the Gospel has been taken back to these many centres. The 
patients are only seen twice a week. One hundred and twenty- 
seven opium patients have been treated, but as there is no 
opium refuge for residents, it has not been possible to know 
the results of this work. Good spiritual results have been seen 
in two cases. 

Bhamo. — The baptism of Mrs. Li, the wife of the native 
helper at this station, is thankfully recorded. There are a 
good number of Chinese who seem more or less influenced by 
the Gospel and who attend the services, ^fhe work among 
the soldiers and other English-speaking residents, and the 
children, is carried on as usual, and while it is diflicult to 
tabulate results of such labour, there is no doubt as to the 
actual value of the testimony constantly borne to those who 
otherwise would have no spiritual help. Mr. and Mrs. 
Selkirk specially need the prayers of God's people in their 
naturally discouraging labours. 



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atidint; in the centra if Dr. 
.liirtiii,»hoBmv«d in China 



THE PROVINCE OF HU-PEH 

Area 9 71,410 square miles, or considerably larger than 
England and Wales. Population, 35,2809685, or equal to 
that of EngUmd and Wales and the State of New York 
combined. 

Hu-peh (North of the Lake) is the central province of China^ and 
densely populated. Hankow^ opened as a port in 1861^ is called the 
'^ Mart of Nine Provinces. " In June 1874 the C. I. M. rentedpremises in 
Wu-chang^ the capital^ as a hase for the regions beyond. The business 
centre has since been removed across the river to Hankow. 

The C.I.M. now has 4 stations^ 4 outnstations^ 15 missionaries^ 17 
native helpers^ 5 being unpaid^ and 98 communicants. 

Hankow, situated some 600 miles up the Yang-tz at the 
mouth of the Han river, is occupied by the C.I.M. merely as 
a business centre for the work to the west and north. As 
a Mission station it is well worked by other Societies. All 
workers going to the west or up the Han have to tranship 
here, and much necessary business has to be transacted for the 
hundreds of workers at their distant stations. 

I-chang, situated at the mouth of the Yang-tz gor^s, 
was once used as a base for work in Hu-nan. The establish- 
ment of steamboat traffic from Hankow to Chang-sha has 
made this less necessary, but it is closely situated to the 
north-western Hu-nan border. All workers going to the 
west of China have to tranship at this station into the native 
junks in order to proceed through the gorges. It is mainly 
used as a business centre. 

Lao-ho-keo. — During the summer a visit to the hills 
enabled the workers to work among those not generally 
reached, and as many as 300 regularly attended the services 
at this time. Twelve persons have been baptized during the 
year, and had all who were ready been able to come, the 

73 



74 CHLNA AND THE GOSPEL 

number would have been higher. The average Sunday 
morning attendance has been about 200. The street chapel, 
which is well located and seats about 150 to 180 persons, nas 
been a centre of good work. It has been constantly filled 
with an ever-changing audience, as many as 700 passing 
through in one day. Mr. Lagerquist has during the 
year treated 2720 patients, saved 18 persons from an 
attempted suicide by opium, had 5 successful obstetric 
cases, 76 operations, and 3 cataract cases, all successful. 
Through the generosity of some of the Christians the 
premises for a hospital, which with repairs have cost 830 
taels, have been obtained. Of this sum more than 500 taels 
were given locally ; and when funds allow, it is desired to 
erect a suitable chapel. 

At Si-kwan, about three and a half English miles distant, 
the Misses Black are engaged in their work. Here there has 
been a good deal of visiting undertaken, and 32,000 cash 
worth of books sold. There are 94 scholars in the 
girls' day school, and the three weekly classes for women 
have been attended by about 35 pei'sons at a time. 

Kuh-cheng. — At this centre about 60 persons hear the 
Gospel daily in the chapel, while the average attendance 
on Sunday amounts to 100 persons. There are also 3 
out-stations. Seven men appear to be ready for baptism. 
During the year there have been many openings among 
the scholars and officials of the district. Altogether there 
are 4 chapels in this district, with 25 members and about 
55 inquirers, of whom 14 are ready for baptism. 

Shi-nan Fu. — Mr. Parsons has been compelled to work a 
good deal from place to place, in superintending the work at 
various centres, and has not been able to be in i-esidence at 
this station during the year. The number of centres at 
which interest has been manifested has necessitated a con- 
siderable amount of arduous itineration. 



THE PROVINCE OF KIANG-SI 

Area, 69,480 square miles, or considerably larger than 
Scotland and Ireland combined. Population, 26,53^,125, 
or nearly equal to that of England. 

The name Kiang-si means ^^ West of the River," and is an abbrevia- 
tion of Kiang-nan-si, or ^^ South of the River^ West." The C.I.M. 
commenced work in this province in 1869. In 1886 the Kwang-hsin 
river district was made a special centre for women's work. 

The C.I.M. work in this province divides itself into three districts: 
1. The Kan river in the west and south-west. 2. The Kwang-hsin 
river on the east. 3. The Fu-kshow Fu and Chien-chang Fu districts 
to the south-east, worked by the German Associates from Barmen. 

The C.I.M. now has 26 stations, 66 out-stations, 92 missionaries, 
131 native helpers, 17 being unpaid, and 1618 communicants. 



I. THE KAN RIVER DISTRICT 
North, West, and South Kiang-si 

Superintendent — Archibald Our-Ewing 

The year has been one of steady and unhindered work 
with good general progress, though the accession of Church 
membership has not been large. The work at Kan-chow Fu 
has been reinforced by Mr. and Mrs. F. Hall after their 
marriage. Mrs. Hall, who has done excellent work in the 
schools at Kwei-chi, hopes to open schools in her new district. 
Messrs. Howe and Porteous are devoting themselves to study 
at Kan-chow Fu, while Miss Duncan is also engaged in the 
acquisition of the language at Chi-an Fu. Mr. Domay has 
settled at Chang-shu, after furlough, to relieve Mr. and Mrs. 
Blasner, who hope shortly to take fiirlough. 

During the last week of October, 27 workers met in 
Conference at Chi-an. The Lord graciously manifested His 
presence in their midst. Many subjects directly connected 
with the work were under consideration, and the papers and 

75 



76 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

discussions were found most helpful. The last Conference 
took place in 1890, and the workers look back with profound 
gratitude to God for all that He has done since then. The 
removal of Mr. H. C. Burrows, whose example of unreserved 
devotion to the Lord^s service will be a stimulus to many, is 
mourned by all. 

Kiu-kiang. — At this centre Mr. Mills is kept fairly busy 
with the business work of the province, though giving what 
time he can spare to the preaching of the Gospel. On the 
Lord's day about 30 regularly attend the services, but as the 
majority of the converts live to the north of the river, bad 
weather makes it impossible for them to come at times. 
Mrs. Mills has a Sunday School for the European children, 
and also gives them some tuition through the week. Mrs. 
Orr-Ewing has instructed the Chinese women, and has several 
times visited the Christians living on the north bank of the 
river. 

Ta-ku-t'ang. — ^There have not been many tokens of 
encouragement at this centre, but Mr. Reid writes, "The 
reapinfi: time cannot be far away.*" The attendance at the 
Sunday morning meeting variei irom S5 to 40, while a 
number of meetings are conducted in the street chapel. A 
free school is carried on with about 10 scholars. One thing 
is noticeable, that, whereas the term "foreign devil*" was 
freely used in former times, the people are now more 
courteous in manner. May this confidence lead them to trust 
in our Saviour. The Home here is beautifully situated, and 
some tired workers have enjoyed rest and change and fellow- 
ship with the host and hostess. 

Nan-kang; Fu. — The average attendance at the services 
is 20. In the itinerations through the district, Mrs. Duff 
and her youngest child have gained access for themselves and 
Mr. Duff into many homes which otherwise would have 
been closed. At the prefectural examinations much time was 
spent with the students who had gathered for the last ex- 
amination under the old regime. Fully 1000 New Testa- 
ments were distributed, which were gladly accepted. May 
God^^s word be a light in meiny a home where darkness hais 
hitherto reigned. 

Nan-chang Fu. — Within this large city the late Mr. H. 
C. Burrows lived a life of singular devotion to God in the 
interests of this people, and his loss is deeply mourned. 



THE PROVINCE OF KIANG-SI 77 

Despite considerable bodily weakness, he laboured earnestly 
to tne last, shortly before his death having arranged the pur- 
chase of property which would locate him in the centime of the 
business quarters of the city, his aim being to declare Christ 
to those who had never hecuxl of Him. May the Lord fulfil 
his heart's desire. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thor, who live outside the city, have rendered 
many services to their brothers and sisters passing to the 
more distant stations, besides forwarding letters and books. 
Preaching in the street chapel, which seats 60 persons and is 
at times crowded, has been conducted by the evangelist and 
Mr. Thor. The Sunday services are attended by about 30 
persons. At a place some 30 miles distant there is an in- 
teresting work carried on by a Mr. Chiao. Owing to the 
Lord'^s blessing upon his life and testimony, idolatry has dis- 
appeared from this small village. At his own expense Mr. 
Chiao has built a small place for worship. Six have been 
baptized during the year. 

While the C.I.M. suffered no loss, either in life or property, 
in the serious riot which took place in this city in February 
1906, the Mission would record its deep sympathy with those 
who have been bereaved in connection with other Societies. 
Mr. and Mrs. Kingham and child, with five Roman Catholic 
priests, lost their lives in this sad riot. 

Chang-shu. — ^Three persons were added to the Church 
by baptism duiing the early summer, and an out-station has 
been opened 10 miles to the south, at Yung-t'ai, where 
there is a good deal of interest manifested. The chapel can 
accommodate about 150 persons, but at present there are 
not more than about 30 or 40 inquirers in addition to 
the 19 Church members. Mrs. Blasner has faithfully en- 
gaged in visiting, and has been heartily welcomed into the 
homes of the people ; while Messrs. Blasner and Domay have 
been well received during their journeys in the surrounding 
country. 

Lin-kiang Fu. — In the city the work has been far from 
encouraging, but Mrs. Traub's kindness in nursing several 
sick children and in dispensing medicine to others has^ 
resulted in the prospects of the women's work being brighter. 
There are numerous opportunities for work among the 
villages and homes across the river, where there is a large 
orange-growing district, and the advent of two or three lady 
workers would be most welcome. 



78 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

An interesting work has been commenced in the prison 
by one of the Church members who has been appointed 
jailer. The ringleader of the Chane-shu riot, who is still 
confined there, has said, "If I had known this doctrine 
before, I should not have been here now.'' There are many 
inquirers at Shui-peh, and the interest in Hsin-yu Hsien is 
most encouraging. There are 10 hopeful inquirers at 
Shui-chow Fu, which city should have a resident missionary. 

Yuan-chow Fu. — While visiting various places in this 
prefecture during the early summer Mr. Orr-Ewing was 
much impressed by what he saw. The Christians and 
inquirei's have shown an unusual readiness to contribute 
toward the support and extension of the work. For 
instance, Mr. Chu, the potter at Nan-k'eng, has built a place 
four stories high ; on the ground floor there is a chapel, on 
the first floor accommodation for Chinese guests, on the 
second floor accommodation for the missionaries, while the 
third floor consists of a summer house for visitors to pass the 
hot evenings. Mr. Chu is a most cheerful giver, and the 
cost has been entirely borne by himself. Mr. Li of Ping- 
hsiang is a quiet, unassuming, but capable worker, and has 
hitherto given his time and labour witnout remuneration. 

The work has been extending on self-supporting lines, 
11 having been baptized during the year, while there are 
several hundi'ed hopeful inquirers, and between two and 
three hundred attending the services. In addition to money 
conti'ibuted for rent and repair of premises, the Christians 
have given $253. 

Chi-an Fu. — ^This important prefecture has been well 
worked during the year, 17 having been received during the 
year by baptism. The chapel seats about 120, and 8U)out 
100 regularly attend. Six meetings are held on Sunday, and 
four others during the week. Fifteen persons attend the 
services at the An-fti out-station, and some 10 at T'ai-ho, 
which was opened in June. 

While there are only about 30 inquirers in the portion 
of the prefecture worked from Chi -an city, about 130 
regularly attend the services, though probably 300 persons 
have put away their idols. The total contributions have 
amounted to $80, although the people are all poor. The 
district has been well worked, the Church centres within 
about 30 miles of the city having been visited, either by 
the two evangelists, or by a missionary with a Chinese helper. 



THE PROVINCE OF KIANG-SI 79 

The work has been kept well in hand by Mr. Taylor, who has 
sought to employ the Christians as far as possible, so that 
while the foreign workers were absent for rest and change at 
Ku-ling the work went on as before. 

Yung-sin Hsien. — This city is situated about 60 miles 
from Chi-an Fu, Mr. William Taylor acting as pastor, while 
the three Finnish ladies reside there for local work. In 
addition to the central station there are 3 out -stations, 
the attendances at the services varying from 160 to 200 
persons. During the year a partly self-supporting Girls' 
School has been commenced, while the contributions amounted 
to $33. The ladies arrange by rotation to be two at home 
in the station, and one in the country visiting the out- 
stations. 

Lung-chuan Hsien. — Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Bunting have 
devoted their time towards this place and the city of 
Wan-an, about 25 miles distant. There has been much 
to give encouragement, the Christians taking a lai'ge share of 
the work, while 10 have been baptized during the year. 
The average Sunday gatherings number about 60 persons. 
A house has been rented in the busy market town of Tsao- 
lin, the central Church supplying the preachers and meeting 
their expenses. At. Wan-an, where the work is most interest- 
ing, the Mission has acquired property. The mainstay of 
the meetings here is a Mr. Liao of the Chinese Imperial Postal 
Service, who is a Christian of sterling worth. The services 
are attended by about 30 persons. 

Kan-chow Fu. — The workers here have been encouraged 
by the arrival of reinforcements. Mr. Home has been 
occupied with the affairs of the whole district, devoting him- 
self also to guest-hall work and the dispensing of medicine. 
The friendliness of the gentry and people of the city is 
largely attributed to this. He has also visited the outlying 
districts, and superintended the itinerations of the Chinese 
workers. Mrs. Home has meetings for women in the west 
of the city, where there have been some cheering cases of 
conversion. Mr. Marshall is responsible for the Church work 
in the city, and for the labours of the Chinese evangelist 
supported by the Christians. He has also superintended 
the building of the Sanatorium on the mountain, nearly 16 
miles distant. Mrs. Marshall has had charge of the women^s 
work to the east of the city, but has been somewhat hindered 



80 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

by the sickness of her children. Lord's Day services have 
been attended by between 150 and 200 persons, the contribu- 
tions for the year amounting to $282. As most of this sum 
is given by the 44 Christians, the average works out at nearly 
$4 per head. 

Mr. Hall undertakes the evangelistic services in the city, 
assisted by the Christians, while Mrs. Hall is arranging for 
a Girls' Scnool, and later for a Boys' School also. Mr. Tyler 
has charge of the out-stations. At Fenff-kane, where the 
Mission fL had a place for some yeai^, the Sngregs^tions 
are usually from 50 to 60. Until this year the market 
people have shown no interest, but things are now changing. 
In Nan-k'ang Hsien the work is not promising. A house has 
been mortgaged in the busy market of T^ang-chiang, where 
there are nearly 50 regular attendants at worship. In 
several other centres services are also conducted. The 
workers are praying that a medical man may be sent to this 
centre. 

Hsin-feng. — ^The chapel here accommodates 150 persons, 
but the average attendance is not over 50. Many neighbour- 
ing market towns have been worked. At Lung-nan 10 have 
been baptized, and considerable interest memifested in the 
truth. The people are more lawless than is usual, and the 
villages resemole fortified places, with high walls surrounding 
them, with loopholes for nring upon any who attack them. 
Of the 10 persons baptized, some give promise of becoming 
bright witnesses for Christ. The total number of persons 
baptized in North, West, and South Kiang-si is 98, which is 
the exact number baptized in the previous year. There is, 
however, every reason to expect a larger number during the 
next twelve months. 



II. THE KWANG-HSIN RIVER DISTRICT 
Noeth-Easteen Kiang-si 

Superintendent — ^Edward Pearce 

Rao-chow. — With the exception of Kwang-hsin Fu, this 
is the most recently opened station in the district, and con- 
sequently the work has not yet developed much. In addition 
to the regular evangelistic efforts, services have been com- 
menced in three new places during the year. In one of these. 



THE PROVINCE OF KIANG-SI 81 

King-teh-chen, a suitable house has been purchased. This 
is the centre of the porcelain industry for all China, and a 
most important place. There are already hopeful signs of 
interest and blessing, several inquirers meeting regularly 
for worship. The small day school has been earned on, 
though the medical work, in Dr. and Mrs. Judd^s absence, 
has had to be abandoned. 

An-ren. — ^The work here has sustained a serious loss 
through the death of Elder Wang, a godly and zealous 
preacher of the Gospel, through whom many have heard of 
the way of scJvation. In addition to the regular station 
work, considerable time and effort have been spent in a busy 
town called T'eng-kia-pu. There are a good many inquirers 
in the neighbourhood of Loh-p'ing Hsien. The seating 
accommodation of the various little centres connected with 
this station amounts in the aggregate to about 500 or 600, 
and the Christians have contributed very liberally to various 
objects, $26 being sent to the Queensland Kanaka Mission, 
superintended by a former worker in this city. 

Kwei-chi. — In this district there are 12 out -stations, 
where services are regularly conducted. Much of the 
workers' time is necessarily occupied in visiting and super- 
intending work in these centres, Miss Marchbank alone 
having paid 49 visits to the out-stations, in which work she 
has walked nearly a thousand miles. During the year a 
Boys' School ana dwelling-house have been built. The 
Chinese Christians in this district have contributed over 
$600 during the year : $147 and $76 for the Boys' and Girls' 
Schools respectively; $8 for the British and Foreign Bible 
Society ; $118 for the Old Women's Home — a kind of 
infirmary ; and $167 for the general building fund. 

Shang-tsing. — There are 2 out-stations connected with 
this centre, one, however, being so distant that it is not 
easily worked. Generally speaking, the work consists of the 
usual meetings for adults ana children and the daily preaching 
to visitors, also a little dispensary work, and visits to the 
out-stations. 

Tung-hsiang. — There are 8 out-stations connected with 
this centre, which are regularly visited, more than half 
the workers' time being thus occupied. One of them is 
situated some 20 miles from the centre, and entails a good 

6 



82 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

deal of travelling. The Christians have opened an out- 
station on their own responsibility, and contribute annually 
S46 for the rent of the house and support of the evangelist* 
The Christians at Peh-kan, also an out-station, maintain a 
small chapel at a little town not far oiF, several places en- 
deavouring to do similar work. 

Kwang-hsin Fu. — ^This is the youngest station in the 
whole district and the work is still in its earliest stages. 
Only 6 persons have been baptized, and there are no out- 
stations. The surroimding towns and villages have been 
constantly visited, and guest -hall work has been carried on 
in the city. About 300 patients have been treated in the 
dispensary, all of whom have heard something of the Gospel. 
Diiring the local examinations, special efforts were made to 
reach the students, two evangelists and native Christians and 
others assisting. 

Yu-shan. — The work here is centred in the city itself,, 
and in 8 out-stations, at most of which regular meetmgs are 
carried on. Instead of having a man in charge who can 
conduct the meetings, as is the case in most of the out-stations^ 
and other districts, the workers here have adopted the plan 
of putting a Christian woman in charge, and sending help for 
the meetings. In several instances this has succeeded very 
well. Most of the $43 contributed by the Christicuis have 
been given for the support of a new out-station during the 
year. Practically the native Church has paid all expenses 
connected with this out-station, and they hope in future to 
do so. 

Yang-kou. — There are 4 out-stations worked from this^ 
centre, one of which, Kwang-feng, was until recently occupied 
as a central station. Though there are only three mission- 
aries here, they have been able to do a good deal of work 
outside the ordinary station routine. The districts and 
villages have been regularly and constantly visited. The 
work has suffered through the removal by death of two 
faithftd native helpers, whose places it will l>e difficult to fill. 
It is interesting to know that at one out-station the Christians^ 
held a Memorial Service upon receipt of the news of Mr. 
Hudson Taylor's death, and sent the sum of $20 to the 
Mission, as a thank-offering for Mr. Taylor's services to 
China. 



THE PROVINCE OF KIANG-SI 8S 

I-yang. — ^This station has been recently reinforced by a 
new worker from New Zealand, though the absence of others 
has thrown the burden of the work upon Miss Mackenzie and 
Miss Dring. With 4 districts to superintend, one of the 
workers has been absent from the city most of the time. The 
city congr^ation has kept up well, and a new chapel is much 
needed. TRiere have been 22 baptisms in connection with 
this work during the year, most of them being at the out- 
stations, where the work has been more encouraging than in 
the city. At one of these, Shwang-kiang, 10 were baptized, 
and one convert has given a site for a new chapel. The 21 
Church members at this out-station have contnbuted $142^ 
which will probably be used for the proposed chapel, and 
some of those who contributed have also promised to provide 
part of the food for the workmen engaged in erecting the 
Duilding. 

Ho-kou. — There have been no baptisms at this centre 
this year, mainly because Miss Gibson^s time has been so 
much occupied in superintending building operations that 
she has not been able to devote the usual attention to the 
country work. The station has also been somewhat under- 
manned, owing to Miss IlalPs absence on furlough. Hitherto 
the premises at this centre have been very poor and unsuitable, 
but now this deficiency has been met, for which there is cause 
to thank God. One feature of the work here is the number 
of well-to-do business men connected with the Church, which 
gives great promise for its future development. Perhans the 
most encouraging feature, however, is the number of bright 
young Christians who have formed themselves into a Christian 
Endeavour Society. 



III. THE FU-CHOW FU AND CHIEN-CHANG FU 

DISTRICTS 

Worked by the German Associates from Barmen 

Fu-chow. — ^The average attendance at the services at the 
central station amounts to about 60 persons, while from SO 
to 50 are frequently found in the street chapel. Six persons, 
have been baptized during the year, making a total of 16 
communicants. There has been good progress at the out- 
station of Ti-kia-tu, the Sunday services being attended by 
numbers vai-ying from 20 to 60, with 13 scholars in the day 



84 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

school. Another out-station has been opened at Tu-teo, 
with an average attendance of about 50. During the year 
1700 Scriptures and portions have been sold, and the Church 
contributions have amounted to '^'^'^ 



Chien-chang Fu. — The workers here, in addition to 
house-building, have, with the native helpers, made many 
long journeys into the country. One thousand seven 
hundred and seventy Bibles and portions have been sold, 
with 2000 calendars and $60 worth of tracts. Two 
persons have been baptized ; there are 16 inquirers and an 
average attendance of about 45 persons at the services; 
while the collections have amounted to over $53. The 
out-stations have been regularly visited every fortnight, and a 
small day school opened during the year. 

Nan-feng;. — Until 1901 this was only an out-station of 
Kien-chang, so that there have been but a few years of resident 
missionary work here. During the last year 9> persons 
were added to the little Church by baptism, while there are 
5 applicants for that rite, and about 50 persons who more 
or less regularly attend the meetings. On Sundays the 
average attendance is as much as 80 to 100 persons, and 
better and more commodious premises are much needed. 
The expenses of the Chinese Church amounted during the 
year to $171, of which sum the Chinese contributed $124, not 
including the special gift of guest-hall furniture, etc. There 
are 2 self-supporting out-stations, with an aggregate attend- 
ance at the meetings of about 40 persons. Services are held 
here on three Sundays each month. A small self-support- 
ing school for boys has been opened. In his itinerations 
the native helper travelled nearly 2000 miles during the year. 



THE PROVINCE OF NGAN-HWEI 

Area 54,810 square miles ^ or considerably larger than the 
State of Nexv York, Population, 23,670,314, or the same as 
Austria, 

The name Ngan-hwei is taken from the two leading cities^ Ngan-kin 
and Hwei-chow. The population is largely immigrants from other 
provinces, who occupy the country desolated by the Tai-ping rebellion, 
when thirty out of its thirty-nine millions were swept away. 

The C.I.M. entered the province in 1869, and was the only 
missionary society there for sixteen years. Since 1886 the C.I.M. 
Training Home for men has been situated at Ngan-kin. 

The C.I.M. now has 12 stations, 29 out-stations, 46 missionaries, 
68 native helpers, 16 being unpaid, and 652 communicants. 

Superintendent — C. T. Fishe 

Ng^an-kin. — ^During the New Year festivities and holidays 
special services were held for the shop-keepers, at which a 
fair number attended, and durine the three months when the 
Triennial examinations were held large numbers of students 
visited the guest hall. At the out-station of Ta-tong the 
work goes forward slowly, 6 persons having been baptized 
during the year, while there are several promising inquirers. 
About 3000 persons attended the preaching hall at this centre 
during the year. In the anti-foreign city of Yong-cheng there 
are at last some signs of awakening, about 100 persons 
coming to the services held when the place was visited. At 
several other centres there are hopeful signs. Between 500 
and 600 people have been treated in the city dispensary. The 
average attendance at the Sunday services is about 96, while 
80 attend the Sunday School. The total contributions of 
the Church amounted to nearly $38. 

Chih-chow* — No report has been received from this 
station. 

85 



86 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

Wu-hu. — Although there have been no baptisms during 
the year, the work at this centre is hopeful, some of the 
promising cases having been deferred for a time. At 
Hwang-nu-tu, about 20 miles away, there is a good number of 
hopeful inquirers; while at anouier centre, not far distant, 
the Christians have bought a nice plot of land and put up a 
small building for conduct of public services. At Tai-ping 
Fu the evangelist reports a number of inquirers, both in the 
city and surrounding country. At Yii-ki-kiai the chapel 
has unfortunately been destroyed by fire. 

Ning-kwoh Fu. — ^The workers here have been much 
helped. There have been reasons for fearing a falling-oiF at 
this centre, but through the goodness of God this has not 
been the case. Thirteen persons have been baptized during 
the year, and an average of 70 have attended the services, 
many of whom come from a distance. The collections as 
reported only amount to $9. At Hu-suen, where the work 
is carried on by native helpers, there is a membership of 41, 
while the chapel, which holds 120 persons, is frequently 
filled. At Hwang-tu, under native helpers, there are 4f6 
members, and the chapel, which holds about 80, is generally 
filled on Sunday. At Ma-shang-pu there are 21 members, 
but the work has suffered here through the backsliding of 
the former leader. Singularly, the chapel which he built 
and the framework of his own new dwelling-house have 
both fallen, so that worship is carried on in a private home. 
At 6 of the other out-stations the work is less developed, 
each place having a small chapel, but able leaders being 
lacking in 5 of them. 

It has not been possible to properly work the King Hsien 
district with its out-stations. An effort has been made 
to purchase a suitable house for a chapel at Su-ma-pu, $62 
having already been given and as much again promised. 
In this district there are 41 members and 20 inquirers and 
about 20 adherents, while the contributions have amounted 
to $28. 

Kuang-te-chow. — The work at this centre has gone 
steadily forward, 15 persons having been baptized during the 
year. One hundred and twenty inquirers have been enrolled, 
making a total of 441 ; while 38 candidates for baptism have 
been received, making a total of 81. 

Kien-ping Hsien. — ^Last year has been the best year in the 



THE PROVINCE OF NGAN-HWEI 87 

history of this station, there being more consistent work done 
by the inquirers than hitherto. There are about 90 inquirers 
in all. Only one person has been baptized during the year. 
The average attendance at the services has been about 120, 
while the seating accommodation of the chapel is 250. A 
considerable amount of itinerant work has been undertaken, 
and as the young evangelist is now able to enter upon his full 
duties, the missionaiy in charge hopes to be more free for 
breaking new ground. Every morning dispensary work has 
been engaged in. The total contributions of the Church 
amounted to 17,290 cash. 

Hwei-chow. — ^The work in this district, which is divided 
into four sections, is encouraging. 

1. In Hwei-chow and the surrounding district there is the 
same spirit of indifference although the Gospel is daily 
preached. The most hopeful conditions are in the surrounding 
country, several centres having been opened with hopeful 
beginnings. There has been blessing in the school, some of 
the scholars having decided for Christ. The school, which has 
23 scholars, is entirely self-supporting, $90 having been con- 
tributed towards the expenses. 

2. At Tuen-ki and Shang-ki-keo the work has been 
carried on by a faithful old Christian assisted by a Bible- 
womein. At Tuen-ki the average attendance has been 12, 
while at Shang-ki-keo there has been a ten days^ Bible School. 
There are 25 members and inquirers here. 

3. At Tsih-ki Hsien and Miao-sheo there has not been 
much progress in the city, the work in the latter place, how- 
ever, making good headway, there being an average attend- 
ance of about 30 at the services. A Bible School was 
held in the city. 

4. At Shun-an Hsien and district the work has been 
making ^ood progress, but as it is a stronghold of Romanism 
the work is not easy. About 30 persons meet regularly 
from Sunday to Sunday. Much prayer is needed tor the 
evangelist and helpers at this centre. In the whole district 
19 persons have been baptized during the year, and it is 
believed that many more have been brought to Christ, who, 
after needed probation, will be received. 

Lai-an. — ^The services are conducted at four centres. In 
the city a number of the students who are stud3nlng English 
with their Christian teacher come to the meetings on Sunday, 
the Christian teacher himself frequently agisting. The 



88 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

death of the evangelist at Kuh-cheng has been a heavy loss 
to the work. At the out-station of Fu-hsing-tsih 6 persons 
have given proof of sincere change of heart, and it is hoped 
that some will be baptized shortly. In this district there 
are four markets held every ten days, and a street chapel is 
situated near the north gate, where a large number of those 
coming into the market have opportunities of hearing the 
Gospel. The total membership of the four centres amounts 
to 78. 

Liu -an. — Evangelistic meetings have been the most 
prominent feature of the city work. While an effort has 
been made to hold such meetings every evening in the week, 
the average has been about three throughout the year. A 
preaching-hall which has seating accommodation for 60, 
frequently had more than that number, 20 or more having 
to stand. Three persons' have been baptized during the 
year, making a total of 21 members. Three visits, of two 
weeks^ duration each, have been paid to Shu-cheng, where 
9 men were baptized, thus laying the foundations of a new 
Church. There are innumerable openings in the siUTOunding 
country. Mrs. Entwistle's visit to Ho-shan-hsien was the first 
visit paid to that city by a foreign lady. The total contribu- 
tions of the Church amount to $20. 

Cheng-yang-kuan. — Seven persons have been baptized 
during the year at this station, making the total membership 
18. There are 40 inquirers, some of whom appear good 
cases. The average attendance at service is about 90, while 
some 300 persons on an average enter the street chapel daily. 
An out-station has been opened at Sheo-chau, at which centre 
there has hitherto been great opposition. All the surround- 
ing district has been visited some sixteen times during the 
year, and $88 worth of tracts and portions of Scripture 
sold. The total contributions of the year, including those 
given toward the school expenses, in which there are 10 
pupils, were $34. 

Ying-chow Fu. — At the central station 10 persons have 
been baptized during the year, making a total number of 
17. Daily preaching and bookselling has taken place at 
the doorway of the Mission premises on the main street, 
and evangelistic services at certain seasons have been held in 
the evenings. The offerings of the Christians have amounted 
to 8880 cash. There are two regular preaching centres in 



THE PROVINCE OF NGAN-HWEI 89 

the country, situated 50 and 35 miles away respectively, and 
at several other places services are occasionally held. At 
one of these places some 8 to 15 people regularly meet, 
and it is hoped that one or two of tnese will shortly be 
baptized. 

Tai-ho. — ^The street chapel at this station is the chief 
centre for coming in contact with the people, the average 
daily attendance being about 30 persons. At the Sunday 
services the average attendance numbers 60, of whom 20 
come regularly. One evangelist has given the whole of his 
time to country work, while the other does so as the city 
work allows. At three centres in the country Divine 
Service is regularly held. At one of these, Fei-ho-keo, 32 
miles to the north, some 35 persons meet on the first Sunday 
of each month in a chapel built by themselves on land 
belonging to one of the Christians. At the other two 
centres the attendance is about one-third of that number. 



THE PROVINCE OF CHEH-KIAN6 

AeeAj 36,670 square miles^ or nearly equal to (hat ofBtdga/rku 
Population 11,580,692, or more man Scotland^ Ireland^ and 
Wales combined, 

Cheh-kiaug (The Forked River) is the smallest province in China. 
Historically it is rich in places and associations. 

In this province Mr. Hudson Taylor commenced work in China. 
During the crisis of 1900 eight members of the C.J.M. with three of 
their children were put to death in this province. Every prefectural 
city has a Mission station. 

The C.l.M. now has 29 stations^ 216 out-stations, 80 missionaries, 
406 native helpers, 183 being unpaid, and 5233 communicants. 

CI.M. Superintendent — J. J. Meadows 

Cheh-kiang. — Mr. Meadows, superintendent of the 
province, who went out to China in connection with the 
Mission in 186S, has during the year celebrated his seven- 
tieth birthday. He reports that during the year nearly 600 
persons have been addea to the Churches in Cheh-kicuig in 
connection with the C.I.M., and states that there has Been 
generally an encouraging spuitual growth. Among the 
features which he records as hopeful is the increase of local 
Conferences, the strong clan feeling and difference of 
administration making tihe larger assemblies for the present 
perhaps less profitable. While he records that the year has 
had some special trials, he emphasises the many causes for 
thanksgiving. Among these was the preservation of the 
Mission property at Tien-tai. The people who rose to 
destroy the Roman Catholic property plainly notified their 
intention of protecting the Protestant Missions, and although 
the C.I.M. property was only separated by ten yards from 
that of the Roman Catholics, it was left untouched, and a 
shed belonging to the Roman Catholics which adjoined the 
C.I.M. premises was not fired lest our Mission property might 
be destroyed. 

90 



THE PROVINCE OF CHEH-KIANG 91 

Shao-hsing^. — During the year 52 men and women have 
been baptized, and out of the number of 400 communicants 
it has been found necessary only to discipline 3. The 
little Churches round this centre nave together supported a 
pastor at a salary of $90 a year, and have also contributed 
$86 towards the opening of a new out-station and $30 for the 
opening of a Mission hall in the northern suburb of the 
city, their total contributions amounting to $250, a good 
sum for these poor Christian people. 

Hsin-chang^. — ^Twice during the year, owing to official in- 
justice, the city has been seriously threatened, the gates being 
closed and guarded night and day, and the missionaries being 
advised to flee. Nevertheless they and the work have been 
preserved in safety. 

Throughout February and part of March the workers 
were occupied with the Dzing-yiin and Hsin-chang Bible 
School. Seventy men enrolled themselves as students for this 
period of special study, and ample evidence has been found 
of the fruitfulness of this undertaking. Mr. Warren from 
Shao-hsing, when superintending the out-stations, visited 
some 76 villages, some of which had never been visited by a 
foreigner before, and at some of these unexpected places fruit 
from the Bible School was found. 

Of some 50 persons who were examined for baptism, 
mainly at the 3 out-stations, 31 were received into Church 
fellowship. At Dziang-don there are signs of fresh interest, 
some 20 persons attending the services. 

At W ong-bo-taon about 40 persons attend the meet- 
ings, and this out-station badly needs a resident evangelist 
and new premises. At Jih-seng-dong good work is being 
carried on in the erstwhile Buddhist temple under the old and 
faithful evangelist Mo. Eight large classes in the Sunday 
School are taught by natives with one exception, a prepara- 
tion class being held on Friday evenings, and the Sunday 
afternoon being given up to catechising the people and the 
children on the lessons and addresses. Colportage during 
the year has been difficult. Over 100 persons attend the 
monthly Communion, and the total contributions amount to 
more than $161. 

Hang-chow. — At this station the Mission has an ex- 
tensive work, which is carried on under the cai*e of a most 
devoted Chinese pastor named Ren, who unreservedly gives 
himself and his substance to the extension of God^s work. 



92 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

There are 10 out-stations connected with the central station 
of Hang-chow, the total membership being 287, and the con- 
tributions of the year amounting to $691, though the con- 
tributions from two out-stations have not been reported. 
Twenty-five persons were baptized during the year, and 222 
have made application for baptism. 

Ning^-po. — About two-thirds of the missionary'*s time at 
this station is taken up in business work for the other 
missionaries in the province. The prospects of the Church 
are hopeful, there being over 12 inquirers. The contri- 
butions of the Church members, which number 30, have 
amounted to $43 during the year. 

Feng-hua. — The two workers stationed at this centre 
only reached China in 1904, and are still mainly engaged in 
the study of the language. 

Ning^-hai. — ^At the central station Bible Schools for men 
and women have been held, the attendance being 46 men 
and 20 women. At these gatherings important Church 
subjects were discussed. Bible Schools were also held at 
Tziang-ka. As an illustration of how the coimtry is opening 
to the Gospel one case may be mentioned. Te-ao-dong is 
a small village in which there were no Christians three years 
ago. Two men were baptized there in 1904, and 8 persons 
during the last year. The 2 baptized in 1904 are now 
regular unpaid preachers, and about 20 persons regularly 
attend Divine Service. This place may be taken as indicative 
of others. The Church has suffered the loss of several 
valuable helpers, and fire rendered a number of the Christians 
homeless. The latter calamity was, however, the occasion of 
the manifestation of much Christian love and assistance. 
The parents and friends of the boys have paid $300 towards 
the school expenses, only $40 having to be contributed from 
foreign sources. TTie membership of this Church is 81, the 
attendance on Sundays averages about 135, while the contri- 
butions apart from school ftmds have been $80. At Tsiang-ka 
there have been 20 baptisms. This station, with a member- 
ship of 64, has an average attendance of about 100 persons, 
and collections amounting to $190, apart from the Boys' 
School. The Christians have purchased a plot of ground, and 
hope to build a church when able. At Ding-bong the work 
has been uphill, 3 only being baptized. With a member- 
ship of 16 the attendance at worship has been about 40. 



THE PROVINCE OF CHEHKIANG 93 

Here a new chapel is in course of erection, the Christians 
liberally helping. At So-lin, opened during the year, a house 
has been mortgaged. 

Tien-tai. — During the year 41 persons have been 
baptized, with a prospect of more being received ere long. 
The progress of the work is evident from a comparison of the 
baptisms of the last five years, which are 5, 8, 11, 15, and 41 
respectively. Four sessions of Bible study have been held, 
varying from one to four weeks in duration. At one of the 
out-stations the Christians have built a chapel, which has 
cost them about $500, while at another the Christians have 
given a building for worship valued at about $700. The 
year has not been fre^ from persecution, especially in the 
west of the district, where an elder was beaten and his house 
pillaged, and the crops of another member stolen, and the 
missionary himself somewhat roughly handled. As has been 
mentionea by Mr. Meadows at the commencement of the 
Report of this province, the Mission premises were spared 
in the city when the Roman Catholic buildings were 
destroyed. 

Tai-chow — The work at this centre and its 12 out- 
stations has gone steadily forward. The work has consisted 
of the translation of the Old Testament into Romanised, 
superintending the printing-press, and teaching and training 
native students. During the year the first native pastor was 
appointed to his office, although for some time he has been 
acting pastor. He was converted in the printing office when 
printing the first edition of the Romanised New Testament 
m 1879, and has been a consistent believer ever since, and 
evangelist for the past twenty years. He is partly supported 
by the native missionary fund and partly by the Young 
People^s Association at Ipswich. The native Church has 
been enlarged and entrusted with fuller responsibility. The 
Girls' School, which is partly self-supporting, has had from 
9 to 13 pupils throughout the year. The printing-press 
is the one taken to China in the Lammermuir in 1866. 
With this during the year 1000 Psalms with references in 
Romanised, 500 copies of Grenesis, 2000 tracts in the char- 
acter, and 20,000 small books in the character have been 
printed. 

Twenty-five persons have been baptized during the year, 
while 40 candiaates for baptism have been received, there 
being 207 inquirers. The total contributions of the Church 



94 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

have amounted to $210, exclusive of the Bible Sunday 
collections. 

Huang-yen. — ^There are altogether 766 Church members 
connected with the work at this centre and its 13 out-stations. 
Unfortunately, however, many of these are cold-hearted and 
indifferent. Dining the last year there has been cause for 
encouragement, 26 men and 14 women have been received 
into the Church by baptism. The majority of these have 
been attending the services for several years, and some 
have endured not a little persecution. A new preaching 
centre has been opened at the busy market town of Yun- 

?»n, situated 16 miles to the west of the central station, 
remises for a school had recently been built, and in view of 
the fact that the proportion of women among the Church 
members is very small, several women are in training for 
work among women of the district. The contributions of 
the Church during the year amounted to $113, which, while 
not a large sum, is a slight increase on the previous year, and 
has been contributed by many who are very poor, in spite of 
bad harvests. 

Tai-ping. — At this station there are in all 448 members, 
SO candidates for baptism, and 170 inquirers, while the total 
contributions amount to $78. During the year 14 members 
have been removed by death, 11 names have been removed 
from the Church roll, and 8 placed under discipline, while 
1 person has been baptized and 1 restored. $35 worth 
of Dooks have been sold during the year by the colporteurs 
and other workers. At one out-station, Saen-ngao-gyao, the 
old meeting-place which was mortgaged has had to be re- 
linquished, but one of the members has built a new chapel, 
which he intends presenting to the Mission. At 4 of the 
out-stations Conferences have been held, the attendance being 
70, 80, 140, and 300 persons respectively. 

Hsien-chii. — ^This place was opened in 1874 as an out- 
station, and not occupied by missionaries until 1898. Thei-e 
are now 7 out-stations connected with this centre. Eight 
persons have been baptized during the year, and 1 restored 
' to fellowship, while 7 have died, 1 being excluded, giving the 
present membership at 133. The native contributions nave 
amounted to $66. Two Church. Conferences were attended 
by about 100 persons. A school has been commenced during 
the year, while 45 scholars attend the Sunday School. 



THE PROVINCE OF CHEH-KIANG 95 

Interest has been awakened in a village some 7 miles to the 
west. 

Wen-chow. — ^No adequate report can be given in these 
pages of the work at this station, which has in all 827 Church 
members in full commimion. There has been steady and 
quiet progress all round, and an addition of 119 persons to 
tiie Church by baptism, among whom were 5 young people 
from the schools. A few facts which will indicate the 
nature of the work are all that space can permit. At 
Sa-kah a new chapel has been ingeniously and cheaply con- 
structed. The chapel at He-we-so is to oe again enlarged, 
and a new out-station has been opened. One Christian 
at Yang-tah in the Bah-zie district has given a site and 
built a chapel to seat some 200 persons at his sole cost 
of over $400, while the large new chapel at Hah-zie, with 
a pastor^s residence and other convenient rooms, has been 
erected at a cost of $1300, of which sum $660 was given by 
the Christians, one, a well-to-do man, giving $300 as a thank- 
offering for salvation for himself and wife from sin and 
opium. There has been a marked increase in the contri- 
butions of the Christians to the Lord's work during the year. 
In the south gate district the subscriptions are more than 
double of those last year, and in the city and district half as 
much again. 

In view of the growth of this Church and the multiplica- 
tion of small congregations in the surrounding country, the 
workers have been more and more feeling the need of a Bible 
School for the giving of systematic and thorough Bible study 
to the native helpers. The sale of Scriptures, etc., during 
the year has amounted to $93, against $69 the previous year. 
The following table showing the increase from December 
31, 1897, when Mr. Hunt took charge of the work, up to 
December 31, 1905, will indicate how God has been blessing 
in this station : — 

Districts organised 

Places of worship (about) 

Baptized from commencement 

Communicants 

Paid preachers 

Unpaid preachers 

,, elders and deacons . 
Native contributions . 
Scholars — Boys 
Girls 



1897. 


1905. 


Increase. 


5 


11 


6 


15 


48 


33 


467 


1125 


658 


313 


827 


514 


6 


14 


8 


11 


43 


32 


— 


14 


14 


$76.30 


$1674.68 


$1572.38 


20 


27 


7 


26 


41 


16 



96 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

Bing^-yae. — No adequate report of the prosperous work 
at this centre can be given here. A fuller account was pub- 
lished in ChhuCs Millions for May 1906. Twenty years ago 
this place, then an offshoot of Wen-chow, was appointed as a 
separate station. This year this ofishoot has been formed into 
three different stations as follows : — 





Population. 


Churches. 


Members. 


Bin|;^-yae 


. 388^000 


42 


537 


Tarjung 


. 77,000 


7 


42 


Shui-an 


. 260,000 


20 


263 



In the whole district 1132 have been baptized from the com- 
mencement, the present membership being 882. The bap- 
tisms of the year have been 203, which are far in advance of 
all previous records, being double those of last year. Shui-an 
is now under the charge of Mr. Searle. In the matter of 
self-support the Chui'ch has done far beyond what it had 
undertalcen. Instead of contributing $450 towards the sup- 

Eort of their pastors, as they had estimated, they have contn- 
uted $611, and naturally advance in self-support means 
progress in self-government, for, as Mr. Grierson has reminded 
the Chinese Christians, the Missionary Society should be re- 
garded merely as the scaffold to a building. 

During the year four new churches and four pastor'^s 
manses have been built, the Christians contributing $104S 
towards the expense of this undertaking. They have also 
given $113 towards the Church Benevolent Fund, and $124 
towards the local Church expenses, the total contributions of 
the Bing-yae section during the year amounting to $1839. 

Chin-yun. — ^The work both in town and country at this 
station shows encouraging signs, regular services being held 
at three places in the country, about 60 persons attending 
from as many as 30 different villages. Twelve persons have 
been under definite instruction for baptism, 6 being baptized. 
The contributions at this little Church, which has only 12 
members, have amounted to $20 for general Church 
expenses, while ^5 have been given towards a much-needed 
new chapel. 

T'ai-shuen. — During the year Mr. Grundy has been home 
on furlough, only reaching Shanghai early in December, 
so that no report of the work has been received. 

Yung-kang. — Owing to the changes necessary through 
the death of Mr. Wright, and the appointing of Mr. and Mrs. 



PUBLIC Li;:..A!:Y 



ASTOR. Li: N'OX. AND 
TILDEN JUiNDATlONS 



THE PROVINCE OF CHEH-KIANG 97 

Gracie to this centre, where the dialect is different to what 
they had been accustomed to, the year has been a busy one, 
ana the work naturally rendered difficult by the change of 
dialect. Altogether, Mr. Gracie reports over 1140 meetings 
have been held, while the average attendance at the services 
throughout the year has been 50 men and 35 women, and 
30 boys and girls. $157 have been contributed, part of this 
sum being toward two new chapels needed elsewhere, while a 
beginning has been made toward meeting the support of an 
evangelist. The spring and autumn Conferences, when 150 
persons attended, were felt to be helpful times. In addition 
to these, three classes, of one montVs duration each, were 
held for special Bible study. The Christian Endeavour, 
which was lormed in March, and now has 22 members, has 
been found a valuable agency. During the year, 30 persons 
have been baptized, while several thousand visitors have 
heard the Gospel, 3000 being assisted with medicine. A 
good nupaber of villages have been visited by the evangelists, 
with encouraging results. At the 31 out-stations the work 
is going forward, the aggregate attendance being about 75 
persons. The last day oi each month is observed as a 
monthly prayer meeting for the Chinese workers, and this 
institution has been found most helpful. 

Kin-hwa. — ^There are 83 members and 30 inquirers con- 
nected with this centre, most of the latter having been 
attending regularly for over one year. Work is carried on 
At three centres : in the city, where the average attendance is 
about 60 ; at Ta-shui-kiao, where the average attendance is 
about 45 ; and at Chang-shan, where the average attendance is 
55. On Sundays, when the Lord's Supper is observed, all 
meet in the city, the attendance then varying from 120 to 
150. Among the special efforts made during the year may 
be mentioned some meetings held during the New Year 
holidays, and the efforts made to reach the students when 
they were in the city. It is computed that some 10,000 
students heard the Gospel when in the city for the examina- 
tions. At Pu-kiang Hsien 6 persons were baptized, and 
the Christians of that centre promised $17 towards the new 
<;hapel at Chang-shan, $9 bemg contributed on the spot. 
The total contributions of the Church have amounted to $78. 

Lan-chL — ^Although fire and cholera have broken out 
near the Mission in the city, all the workers have been 
preserved in safety. No baptisms have taken place during 

H 



98 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

the year, but the number of inquirers has been steadily 
increasing, the average attendance on Sunday at chapel being 
80, 20 of whom are baptized members. Between 250 and 
300 patients have been treated each month in connection 
with the dispensary, and a self-supporting day school has 
been opened. A new house at the out-station Shang-tso has 
been rented, the members contributing over $70, which, 
when it is i*emembered there are only 31 names on the books, 
is a good sum for people who are mostly in humble circmn- 
stances. Some 35 persons regularly attend the services at 
the out-stations. 

Yen -chow Fu and Tong-lu. — Dining Mr. Miller^s 
absence from Tong-lu Mr. Fairclough has endeavoured to 
unite the Christians and inquirers of both stations for Bible 
School work. Upon those occasions, varying from two to six 
days at a time, tnese Christians have met together, 40 being 
present for the shorter periods, while from 6 to 10 continued 
throughout the studies for the whole week. During the 
year the membership of the little Church at Yen-chow has 
more than doubled, 6 being added to the Chiut;h. This 
station was only opened in 1902. One out-station has also 
been opened, while Tong-lu with its 3 out-stations has 
been constantly visited. 

Among the items of interest connected with the work one 
may be mentioned, that of a man by whose influence alone 
some 20 persons have been induced to attend Divine Service, 
and of this number 7 or 8 have been accepted as inquirers. 
The average attendance at the city church has been about 
25, the annual collections amounting to $17. 

Chii-chow. — The new year opened with the holding of a 
Bible School, to which 12 men were sent by the native 
Churches, these men also assisting at a month^s special 
evangelistic mission in the city. During the year a boarding- 
school for boys has been opened, 8 being in residence, 
6 of whom have expressed a desire for baptism. Over 260 
persons visit the dispensary every monui, and many of 
these attend the services in consequence. At Hang-pu, an 
out-station 7 miles west of the city, and an important river 
town with a few Church members and a number of inquirers, 
a new chapel has been opened. Tlie history of this place is 
interesting. It was formerly an ancestral hall, and has been 
given to the fJhurch by Mr. Ma, who, with his eldest sister, is 
the last of his clan. During Mr. Emslie^s last visit to this 



THE PROVINCE OF CHEH-KIANG 99 

Elace 90 persons attended the services. Seven persons have 
een baptized there and 25 names added to the list of 
candidates, while the church collections have amounted 
to $66. 

New work has sprung up in two centres 4 and 5 miles 
distant from Chii-chow respectively, and new and commodious 
premises have been obtained in the city. Toward the 
expenses connected with the purchase of these premises the 
natives have contributed $80. It is estimated that $700 
will be needed for renovation and the erection of a chapel, 
and toward this sum the Chinese Christians hope to con- 
tribute $200. 

Ch'ang^-shan. — The work here is centred in the city and 
3 out-stations. For four years, since the crisis of 1900, the 
work has been without a resident missionary, and this has 
been the first year of re-occupation. The evangelist, who 
barely escaped with his life in 1900, has subsequently been 
timid, and has failed to maintain the needed discipline. At 
the central station, 11 have been baptized, while several 
hopeful inquirers have been postponed. At Peh-shih-kiai, 
8 have been received into the Church by baptism, while an 
old Christian woman has been appointed to superintend the 
women's work. At Wang-ao-taiig, while none have been 
baptized during the year, there are 10 candidates for baptism. 
The people in this district are rough, and hard to deal with. 
At Hwa-pu, 2 men have been baptized, and the workers 
are encouraged by the progress evident in the Chinese helper. 
At another centre, about 16 miles to the west of the city, 
there is a movement, 16 men showing interest in the Grospel 
message. 

The report of the work of the Grerman China Alliance has 
not come to hand. 




THE PROVINCE OF HUNAN 

A RE Ay 83,380 sqtiare miles ^ or a little less than the area of 
England and Scotland combined, Poptdation^ 22,169,673, or 
equal to the united populations of Spain and Portugal. 

Hu-naii (South of the Lake) the former gtroughold of the anti-foreign 
feeling^ is now fully open to the Gospel. 

In 1875 the C.l.M. commenced itinerant work in this province^ but 
settled work was not established until 1897. Adam Dorward^ from 
1880 to 1888^ devoted himself to itinerant work in this province. The 
first premises rented in Chang-sha^ the capital^ were secured hj Dr. 
Keller and Evangelist Li. In 1902 Messrs. Bruce and Lowis of the 
C.I.M. were martyred in Chen-chow Fu. 

The C.I.M. now has 5 stations^ 5 out-stations^ 25 missionaries^ 17 
native helpers^ and 166 communicants. 

Chang-teh. — At this station the workers report boundless 
opportunity, respectful treatment, and a willingness on the 
part of the people to hear. The long weary sowing of the 
past is now yielding an abundant harvest, and the greatest 
eflForts of the workers are taxed to cope with the openings. 
During the year 81 persons have been baptized at this station 
and in those districts supervised from this centre. 

The ordinary services have been % well maintained and the 
Church contributions show a slight increase, while the sum of 
S35 was specially given for church improvements. ITie 
Scripture sales have been good, 98 Bibles, 208 New Testa- 
ments, and 6055 Gospels having been sold during the year, as 
well as 20,000 tracts. 

A Bible knowledge examination with prizes for the best 
competitors had astonishing results. The first competitor, 
a yoimg farmer, continued to repeat the Scriptures ne had 
learnt for a solid two hours, from selected passages from 
Grenesis to Revelation, with only three slips. Others did 
equally well. Such tasks prove the good stuff of which the 
Chinese are made. 

In the supervision of the work centring round Nan-chow 
Ting (there being no resident missionary there this year), 

100 



PL^ELiC l.!i;i;Ar.Y 



ASTOI!, Li;X0.\. AND 
TiLlJEX FOIXDATIONS 



THE PROVINCE OF HU-NAN 101 

with other journeys, the missionaries have travelled S883 
English miles. In various places the workers have had 
experiences not dissimilar to the revival in Wales. The 
formal worship and experiences of former years have given 
way to heart -stirring experiences of God's power. Mr. 
Chnton in writing says: "Heathenism seems dumb before 
the movement, but considerable difficulty is being realised 
through Roman Catholic action.*" 

Chang-sha. — It was at this station, only opened in 1901, 
and the capital of the formerly anti-foreign province, that Mr. 
Hudson Taylor breathed his last oh Jime 3, 1905. That he 
who had given his life for the opening of inland China should 
close his long and arduous earthly career in the Mission 
station opened in the last stronghold of opposition is as 
appropriate as it is beautiful. As the Aill account of the last 
days of the beloved founder of the China Inland Mission 
has been already published in Chmds M'dlwns^ detailed 
reference need not be made to them here. 

Not long after the event referred to above, Dr. and Mrs. 
Keller and Dr. and Mrs. Barrie left for furlough, leaving the 
Church work in the charge of Mr. Hampson, and the medical 
work under the care of Dr. Laycock, who had but recently 
arrived. The absence of four experienced workers from this 
station is naturally very crippling to the work, and those left 
much need the prayers of God's people. The evangelistic 
work has been carried on by the united efforts of the Chinese 
and foreigners. The street chapel, which holds about 200, 
has often been filled with eager listeners. On an average 30 
persons meet every Sunday morning at the Lord^s table. In 
the itinerant work in the surrounding country the Chinese 
Christians have taken an active part. 

A preaching- hall outside the South Gate has been 
financially supported and supplied with speakers by the 
Christians themselves. Eight persons have been baptized 
during the year, while several members have been transferred 
as helpers to other centres of work. Special classes for the 
instruction of the Christians have been held with encouraging 
results. The day school, which has been limited to 12 
scholars, has prospered, while the reading-room has been 
well visited by students. 

Since the departure of Dr. Barrie on furlough the medical 
work has been imder the charge of Dr. Laycock. During the 
year a site for a hospital was presented by the Governor of 



102 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

the province, through Mr. HaiTis, Resident Commissioner of 
Customs, but owing to the locality not being considered 
suitable a generous gift of Tls.2000 was made instead. 
The site has now been chosen outside the walls of the city, 
as being more healthy than within. 

Yuan-chow and Pao-ching 

The work at these two centres is carried on by the workers 
connected with the Liebenzell branch of the Mission. This 
branch has recently been formally organised under the title 
of The Liebenzell Mission in Association with the C.LM. 
Formerly the workers from this centre had worked as ordinary 
members of the Mission, but with the larger developments of 
this work in Germany it has been thought well for it to 
be organised as an affiliated Mission. 

Yuan-chow Fu. — The workers have had good times at 
this centre. Nine hundred students came to the Mission 
during the triennial examinations, which are probably the 
last of their kind. At the evening meetings from 90 to 100 
pei'sons frequently attended, among them many of the 
students. In June and July, Tsing-chow was visited at the 
time of the examinations, and all the shops in the city 
canvassed when bookselling. 

The story of missionary effort in this province has been 
recently published under the title of Pioneer Work in 
Hu-nan, Full particulars of that book will be found in the 
advertisements at the end of this volume. 



STATIONS AND MISSIONARIES OF THE CHINA 

INLAND MISSION 



January 1, 1906 

The areas and populations are taken from the Statesman's Year-Book 
for 1908^ which has adopted a recent census in China^ taken in con- 
nection with the indemnity demanded by the Allies after the Boxer 
crisis. The names in itsuics are those of Associates. The postal 
spelling for the stations has been adopted. When another name^ 
preceded by a dash^ follows the name of a station^ both are necessary 
m addressing letters. Absent against a name means absent at date^ 
December 1905. The date against stations shows date of openings 
and against names date of arrival in China. For postal 'regulations 
see p. 153. 

Province of Kan-suh 

Area, 125,450 sqtuire miles; PopiUationf 10,385,376, or S2 per square mile, 

C.I.M. Work commenced 1876. Superintendent, G. Akdbew. 

10 Stations ; 42 Missionakies (4 on Ftjrlough) ; 19 Native Helpers ; 

147 Communicants. 

Postal Address, via Hankow and Sian Fa : 1, Feng-Slang, via Hankow and Slan Fa. 



LAN-CHOW, 1885. 

G. Andrew .... 1881 

Mrs. Andrew {n^ Findlay) 1882 

H. J. Mason .... 1892 

Mrs. Mason . . 1905 

A. Preedy .... 1892 
J. W. Hewett, M.R.C.S., 

L.R.C.P. .... 1894 

R. W. Kennett . . . 1899 

Mrs. Kennett {n^ Rodger) . 1898 

SI-NING, 1885. 

— Lan-chow. 

H. F. Ridley . . . 1890 

Mrs. Ridley (rUe Querry) . 1890 



LTANG-CHOW. 1888. 

— Lan-ohow. 

W. M. Belcher . . . 1888 

Mrs. Belcher {n4e Rayer) . 1890 

G. W. Hunter . . 1889 

Miss A. E. Mellor . . . 1893 

J. S. Fiddler .... 1896 

Mrs. Fiddler {nde Way) . 1899 

Miss M. L. S. Harman . 1904 

1. TSIN-CHOW, 1878. 

J. B. Martin .... 1898 

Mrs. Martin {n^ Hooper) . 1898 

Miss A. Garland . . 1891 

Miss S. Garland . 1891 

£. J. Mann .... 1903 



303 



104 



CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 



1. FU-KIANG, 1899. 

D. A. G. Harding {absent) . 1898 
Mrs. Harding {n^ Melville) 
(absent) . . . .1898 



CHIN-NING, 1897. 
J, 0. Ryd .... 

PING-LIANG, 1895. 

2>. Tomvall .... 

Mrs, Tomvall {n4e Pederson) 
H, JSeckman .... 

Mrs, Beckman {nie Klint) . 
Miss T, Johnson . 
Miss 0, Olsen 
Miss G. S, Andersen 



1903 



1891 
1891 
1891 
1891 
1891 
1891 
1902 



E, M, PatUson . . 1903 
A. T. Johansson {absent) 1891 

CHEN-YUAN, 1897. 

— Chino-chow. 

Miss E, Petersm , . 1892 

Miss A, Strand . . . 1892 

Miss J, Wedicson {absetit) . 1899 

Miss A, Skollenberg , . 1903 

CHING-CHOW, 1895. 

Miss IT, iMndvaZl . 1894 

Miss C, Wallenberg . 1894 

CHONG-SIN. 

— Ching-ohow. 

F, A, Gustafson , , , 1892 
Mrs. Ghistafson {nSe Larsson) 1893 



Province of Shen-si 

Area, 76,270 square miles; Population^ 8, 450, 182, or 111 per square mile. 

C.I.M. Work commenced 1876. Superintendent, G. F. Easton. 

25 Stations ; 28 Out-stations ; 69 Missionaeiks (8 on Furlough) ; 

73 Native Helpers ; 648 Communicants. 

Postal Address. Those Stations marked 1, address, Tia Hankow and Slan Fa ; 2, direct 
to Station, via Hankow ; 3, via Peking ; 4, via Hankow and Lao-ho-keo ; 6, Slan Fa, 
▼la Hankow. 



2. HAN-CHUNG, 1879. 

G. F. Easton .... 1875 

Mrs. Easton {nie Gardiner) 1881 

R. T. Moodie {ahsewt) . . 1897 
Mrs. Moodie {n6e Mc- 

Lenaghan) {ahseni) . . 1896 

A. B. Lewis .... 1904 

2. MIEN-HSIEN, 1904. 

— Han-ohung. 

A. Goold .... 1891 

Mrs. Goold {n^ Steel) . 1890 

2. CHENG-KU, 1887. 

C. Carwardine . . 1897 

Mrs. Carwardine (n^ Goold) 1891 

2. SI-HSIANG (1895). 

— Yang-hsien. 

Miss A. Harrison . . . 1891 

Miss S. A. Phillips {absent) , 1899 
Miss M. A. Edwards . .1904 

2. YANG-HSIEN, 1896. 

Miss I. M. Coleman . 1891 

Miss M. Batterham . 1899 



4. HSING-AN, 1898. 

0. Bureess .... 1890 

Mrs. Burgess {nde Thomson) 1895 

Miss E. C. Pearce . . . 1904 

1. FENG-SIANG, 1898. 

C. H. Stevens . . .1893 
Mrs. Stevens {n4e Watkins) 1893 

1. CHEO-CHIH, 1893. 

— Feng-siang Fu. 



T. A. S. Kobinson 



1894 



Mrs. Robinson (n& Galway) 1893 
1. MEI-HSIEN, 1893. 



B. W. Middleton (aJ>sent) 
Mrs. Middleton (n^ Jose) 
{absent) .... 
Miss A. M. Wright 

2. SI-AN, 1893. 



1894 

1897 
1903 



1891 



W, Hagquist 

Mrs. Hagquist {nie Hoglund) 1892 
V. L. Nordlund , , , 1891 

Mrs, Nordlund {nie Nilson) 1891 
0, Bengtsson .... 1894 
Miss D. Lindvall . . .1891 



STATIONS AND MISSIONARIES 



105 



2. LAN-TIEN, 1895. 

(7. J, Anderson . . . 1891 
Mrs. Anderson (nie Peterson) 1891 



2. LUNG-CHU-TSAI, 1903. 



J, A. Christensen (absent) 
Chr. Watsaas 



1900 
1900 



5. YING-KIA-WEI, 1895. 
Miss M, Anderson . . 1891 

5. CHEN-KIA-KOU, 1900. 

W. Englund .... 1903 
Mrs. Englwnd {n4e ITedman) 1894 

1. HSING-PING, 1893. 

S. Bergstr&m .... 1894 

Mrs. Bergstrom {nde C. 

PeUrson) . . . 1891 

K Palniberg .... 1902 

G. Palmberg .... 1902 

1. SANG-KIA-CHUANG, 1894. 

— ^WU-KONG. 

Miss A. Olsen . . . 1892 

1. WU-KONG, 1903. 

Miss A. Swanson . , 1891 

Miss C. Anderson . . . 1891 

1. CHIEN-CHOW, 1894. 

O. Ahlstrand . . . 1891 
Mrs. Ahlstrand (nie von 

MaZmb&rg) . . . 1898 

C. J. Jensen .... 1899 

Mrs. Jensen (iiie KoKberg) . 1902 



PIN-CHOW, 1906. 

Ph. NUson .... 1892 

Mrs, Nilson {rUe Netuquist) 1892 

1. LI-CHUAN, 1903. 

V. Eenius .... 1891 

Mrs. Benius (rUe Anderson) 1891 

1. LONG-CHOW, 1893. 

— Feng-siano Fu. 

J. G. Nilson .... 1891 

Mrs. Nilson {n^e Carlson) . 1891 

Miss E. E. Pettersm . . 1891 

Miss IT, A, Hagsten . 1904 

1. KIEN-YANG, 1897. 

— Fkng-siang Fu. 



Miss L, Norden 
Miss A. Jensen 



1892 
1903 



3. TUNG-CHOW, 1891. 

L. H. E. Under . . 1894 

Miss A. Eriksson . . 1892 

T. B. J. B'dlling . . . 1902 

Mrs. Belling {rUe Berzeliiis) 1902 

Miss J. GusUrfsson . . 1905 

3. HAN-CHENG, 1897. 

— YUN-OHENG. 

A. R. Bergling . . .1892 
Mrs. Bergling {nie Aass) . 1893 
Miss O. Angvik (absent) . 1893 

Miss T. HaUrem (absent) . 1899 
N Hogman .... 1903 
Miss 0. G. W. Ahlman . . 1905 

3. HO-YANG, 1904. 

— YUN-OHENO. 

Vacant. 



Province of Shan-si 

Area, 81,830 square miles; PopiUation, 12,200,456, or 149 per square mile. 

C.I.M. Work commenced 1876. Superintendent, A. Lutlet. 

30 Stations ; 82 Out-stations ; 96 Missionaries (5 on Fuklough) ; 

184 Natiyb Helpers ; 1849 Communicants. 

Postal Address, direct to Stations, via Peking ; but places marked 1 to Ping-yao, 
2 to Tnn-oheng, 3 to Shnn-teh Fa, 4 via Peking and Shun-teh. 



FENG-CHEN, 1902. 



K. R. J. Sill . 
Mrs. Hill . 



1893 
1893 



KWEI-HUA-CHENG 



P. E. Ehn 
Mrs, Ehn 



1905 
1905 



PAO-T'EG, 1888. 

— EWEI-HUA-CHENG. 

Emil Johnson . . 1900 

N, Gothberg .... 1902 

SA-LA-TS'I, 1903. 

— KWBI-HUA-CHENG. 

0. E. Oberg .... 1896 

Mrs. Oberg .... 1896 

Miss I. A. Gothberg . 1902 



CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 



TA-TUNO, 1888. 




1. TA-NING, 1886. 




0. F. Nystriim 


1893 


MiM E. Gaontlett . 


1896 


1898 


Mim H. K Ckt . 


1904 


A. Rrliln . "" : 


1891 


Mi« D. HnnnybDn 


1904 


0. E. Lanimi. 

a A. Olttn . . 


1904 
1906 


CHI-CHOW, 1891. 




SOH.PING, 1896. 




HO-TSIN, 1808. 




0. A. Andenai 


1903 


— EiA»a-0How. 


Mn. Avderzm (nU Swahn 


leos 


B. Gillies .... 


1898 


A. A. Myritrg . 


1904 


Mrs. Gillies (»is Bnssell) . 


1897 






MiaR-Htairm, . 


1890 


HUN- YUAN. 1888. 




tliss E. 0. JohnsoD 


1899 


— Ta-t 

Oacar Cwrlin . 


1902 


nUNG-TUNG, 1888. 




J. D. Hoglander . 
O. E. Frtdbtrg 


1902 
1901 


A. Lntley .... 
Mrs. Lntley (n& Roberta) . 


1887 
1898 


J. L. Clwmn 


1901 


N. R King .... 


18&S 






Mrs. King («& Kwr} . 
P. y. Ambler (oAwnJ) . 
E. H. Taylor 


1898 


YING.CHOW, 1897. 




1897 
1898 


Vataia. 




B-CBafber. . 


1902 


TSO-Yim, 1896. 




W. F. H. Briacoa . 

YOH-YANG, 1898. 


1904 


Mil E. K. Anderxm 


1903 






m«,A.Ou^f»(m. 


1903 


— HUNO-TiniO. 




1904 


W.T. Gilmer . . 


1891 


Mat K. Andenm . 


1904 


Mrs. GOmer (n* flam*) . 


1902 


MUs A. SelUTierg . 


190G 


PISG-YANG, 1879. 




PIHO-YAO, 1888. 




W. P. Knight 


1892 


J. Falls . 


1897 


Mrs. Knight (n* Fairbsnk) 


1890 


Mrs. Falls (n* Watton) 
W. B. Mihura 


1899 

1899 


H. Lyons .... 
Mrs. Lyons {nit Guthrie) . 


1808 
1897 


Mm. Milsnm . 
B. K. Gonder 


1899 
1904 


CHtJ-WU, 188E. 








A. Triidinger (oiatn/) . 


1898 


CHlEH-HSm, 1891. 




Mrs. TrUdinger {nit BeU) 
{aSwni) .... 


1897 


MiM C. A. Pike . 


1899 


UisB J. F. Hoskyn 


1800 


Misa F. L. Morris . 


1899 


Miss 0. F. Tippet . . . 


1902 


MisB R. L. Dodds . 


1904 


Miss F. Stellman . . 


1901 


H3IA0-YI. 1887. 




KIANQ.CHOW, 1898. 




D. Urquhart. 


1900 


Vaetaii. 

YI-OHENG, 1902. 




HUO-CHOW, 1886. 




-Cat 


V\s. 


Hias E. French . . 
MiM A. M. Cable . 


1893 
1902 


G. McEie .... 
Mrs. MeKie (nA Ohapmsn) 

Yl-ani, 1891. 


1897 
1897 


1. SI-CHOW, 1885. 




A.Hahm .... 


1890 


F. E. Shindler 


1891 


Mt$. Hahnt (nSt Waiz) 


189S 


Hn. Shindler (Mrs. Ore 




Mitt A. 0. FonOerg 


1898 


Owen, nA Butland) 


1883 


A.A.Erumon . 


1903 



STATIONS AND MISSIONARIES 



107 



YUN-CHENG, 1888. 

E, Folke (cLbsevU) . 
Mrs, Folke {n4e Orann) 



1887 



(oibsent) .... 


1888 


A, Berg .... 


1890 


Mrs, Berg {n4e Hulander) . 


1892 


J, T, Sandberg 


1892 


Mrs, Sandberg {rUe Storhomg) 


1891 


Miss F, Hdllin 


1889 


Miss E, Anderson (ahsenJt) 


1895 


HAI-CHOW, 1896. 




C, H. Tjad&r 


1889 


Mrs. Tjdder (nU Bloniberg) 


1892 


G, W. Wester 


1903 


Miss Ida E, Anderson , 


1903 


PU-CHOW, 1903. 




Miss F, Prytz 


1890 


Miss M, C, Bordson 


1903 


Miss L. M, Nylin . 


1904 



4. LU-AN, 1889. 

F. C. H. Dreyer . . . 1895 

Mrs. Dreyer (n^ Walter) . 1896 

Miss A. Hunt . . . 1893 

Miss £. Higgs . 1897 

4. LU-CH*ENG, 1889. 

Miss Barraclough . 1891 

A. Jennings .... 1897 
Mrs. Jennings {n^ B. 

Palmer) .... 1896 

4. YU-WU, 1896. 

-— Lu-AN Fu. 

D. Lawson .... 1887 
Mrs. Lawson {n^ Arthur) . 1888 

E. J. Cooper .... 1889 



Province of Chih-li 

Area, 115,800 square miles; Population, 20,937,000, or 172 per square mile, 

C.I.M. Work commenced 1887. 
4 Stations ; 12 Out-stations ; 11 Missionaries ; 20 Native Helpebs ; 

82 commtjnioants. 
Postal Address, Tlen-tsin. Stations marked 1, direct to Station, via Peking. 



TIEN-TSIN, 1888. 

G. W. Clarke . . . 1876 
Mrs. Clarke (n^ Gardiner) 1891 



1. HSUAN-HUA, 1902. 



a G. Soderhom 
Mrs, Soderhom 



1893 
1893 



1. HWAI-LUH, 1887. 

C. H. S. Green . . .1892 

Mrs. Green {n^ Astin) . 1891 

Miss J. G. Gregg . . 1895 

Miss A. C. Ware . . 1900 

1. SHUN-TEH FU, 1888. 

M. L. Griffith . . . 1889 

Mrs. Griffitli {n^e Wakefield) 1895 

Mrs. T.E.Botliam(n^e Barclay) 1884 



Province of Shan-tong 

Area, 55,970 square miles; PoptUation, 88,247,900, or QBZper square mile, 

C.I.M. Work commenced 1879. 
2 Stations ; 45 Missionaries (7 on Fuelough) ; 10 Native Helpers ; 

109 commitnicants. 
Postal Address, Okefoo. Ning-hai direct to Station, via Ohefoo. 



CHEFOG, 1879. 

E. Tomalin .... 1879 

Mrs. Tomalin {nie Desgraz) 1866 
Mrs. Cameron (Mrs. BendaU) 

(absent) .... 1883 

A. Hogg,M.A., M.D. . . 1894 



Mrs. Hogg (n^ Bardsley) . 1890 Mrs. Bailer [nie Bowyer) 



Miss E. F. Bum . 
Miss E. G. Boyd . 

Literary Work, 
F. W. Bailer . 



1900 
1903 



1873 
1866 



J. A. Stooke (abtnt) . 

Ura. Stooke (oiMiK) . 
Miw T. AhlBtrom . 
Min M. Betohnidt 

B<ryt' School, 1880. 
F. McCarthy . 

Mrs. McCartliy (n^ Webb) 
Hiss A, Sanderson 
E. Murray {absciU) 

Mrs. Murray (ntb Fairej) 
labitnl) . 
H. J. Ally . 
T. G. WiUett 

Mrs. Willett (lUe Campbell) 
B. McOwan . 

Urs. HcOwBU {nit Mitchell 
W. W, Lindsay . 

Mrs. Lindeay (n^ M. E. 

Fuhe) . 

Misa B. AoRwin . 

Hiss E. A. Shepperd 

Miss E. A. Powell . 



CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 

OirU- SAeel, 1884. 
II H. G. Aplin . 



leoi 



, 1901 

\. A. Wright {«* Harding) 1888 
18 A. Slater . 18B1 



» M. L. Bailer . 
ss A. H. BaUer . 
IS E. A. Fishe . 
IS Jessie Begg 
sa L. C. Batton, EA. 



18S0 
1898 
IBOO 
1901 
1W5 



Preparatory School, 1S96. 
Ufss ISlackiuore (abaeitt) 
Mrs. E. 0. Williama {abaeiU) . 
Hies 1. A. Craig . 
Urs. Amott {rUe H'Connack) 
Miss D. Triidinger 
Hiss E. R. WUte . 
Miss J. L. Tnnier . 

1. NINO-HAl, 1886. 



1002 
1899 

1004 
1906 
1905 



189G 



Province of Ho-nan 

Area, 97,940 sguare mtlM; PopulaHoa, 35,318,800, or 520 jier^jnare mifa, 

C.I.H. Work oommeuced 1876. 

IB 8TAT10NB ; 67 Oinr-STATioNB 49 Missionabibs (4 ok FtrnLoooH) ; 

12B HaTCVE HkLFERM 1042 CoMMtTKICAKTS, 

PoftalAddTMs, OJ.U,, Hankow. Those marked 1, dlreot ta BtaUon.TlftHanluwi 
:t, TtaBanlEOWADdKal-fengFu; S, via Hi 



1. CHOD-CHIA-KOU, 1884. 



J. Brock . . . . 


1887 


Hrs. Brock («4e Elliott} . 


1894 


W. E. Shearer (nJKTif) . . 


1888 


Mrs. Slisarer (n* Burt) 




{absent) .... 


1890 


Mrs. U. Soderatrom (n* 




HoTEsby) 


1891 


HIM M. Macdonald . . 


1898 


1. YEK-OHENG, 1902. 




0. N. Lack .... 


1898 


Urs. Lack (n& Bavin) 


1891 


Miss S. A. Cream . 


189S 


Hiss T. E. Andersen . 


1903 


Uins C. Argento . 


1904 


1. Sl-HWA, 1899. 





Hiss A E. Smitb . 



1. FU-KOU, 1B03. 

Hiss E. WalUce . . . 1S92 

Miss C. M. Hacking , . 1892 

1. CHEN-CHOW, 1896. 
G. W. Guinness, B.A., H&, 

B,C 1897 

Htb. Guinness (n^ a/ iSomff- 

Sero) .... 1900 

Mrs. Talbot (n*Marl8r)(oi«Bi) 1890 

Miss B. Legjjat (absent) . . 1890 

2. TAI-KANG, 1896. 

H. T. Fold .... 1892 

Hrs. Ford (n& Hodgson) . 189S 

C. Howard Bird, RA. . . 1897 

1. KAI-FENQ FU, 1901. 

E.G. Be™ .... 1897 

Hrs. Bevis (n^ Kidman) . 1898 

S. H. Garr, M.D. . . 1901 

Mrs. Garr (nfe S. E. Morris) 1899 

O. A. Anderson . . 1902 



STATIONS AND MISSIONARIES 



109 



3. HSIANG-CHENG, 1892. 

F. S. Joyce .... 1891 
Mrs. Joyce {nie Brook) . 1894 

Miss M. E. Soltan . . . 1901 
Miss M. E. Morris . . 1903 

Miss R. Hjort . . .1905 

1. SHAE-Kl-TIEN, 1886. 

— HSU-OHI-CHEN. 

H. S. Conway . . . 1894 
Mrs. Conway . . 1905 

1. CHING-TZE-KUAN, 1896. 

G. Parker .... 1876 
Mrs. Parker . . . 1880 

1. KUANG-CHOW, 1899. 

A. Argento .... 1896 
Mrs. Argento . . . 1899 



1. YUNG-NING, 1900. 
Vacant -Ho-nan Fu. 

1. SI-NAN HSIEN, 1899. 

Miss B, M. P. Petterson . . 1896 
Miss S, JEngstrom . . . 1897 

1. HO-NAN FU, 1902. 

C, Blom .... 1892 

Mrs, Blom . . . 1905 

Miss A, Janzon . . . 1890 

Miss E, A. E, Burm . . 1894 

Miss M. J, Itamsten . . 1897 

E, 0. Bevnhoff . . . 1902 

K, JL Anderson . . . 1905 

1. MIEN-CH'i, 1905. 

— HO-NAN Fu. 

G. A, StaXharaTifvar . . 1897 
Mrs, StaZhammar {rUe 

Svensson) . . . 1897 



Province of Kiang-su 

Area, 38,600 sqimre miles; PoptUation, 13,980,235, or BQ2per square mile, 

C.I.M. Work commenced 1854. 

6 Stations ; 7 Out-stations ; 55 Missionakies (4 on Furlough) ; 

21 Native Helpebs ; 154 Communicants. 

Postal Address, direct to Stations. Those marked 1, via Oliln-kiang. 



SHANGHAI, 1854. 

D. E. Hoste (dbseni) 

Mrs. Hoste {n6e A. G. 
Broomhall) {absent) 
J. W. Stevenson . 
James Stark .... 

Mrs. Stark (n^ Williams) . 
Miss H. L. Thomas 
Miss £. E. Nay lor. 

Financial Department, 

J. N. Hayward 

Mrs. Hayward {nU Martin) 
G.T.Howell. 

Mrs. Howell (nie Brown) • 
Miss J. MacLaren . 



1885 

1884 
1866 
1889 
1893 
1902 
1904 



1889 
1889 
1892 
1893 
1905 



Business Depa/rtment, 

M. Hardman . . 1889 

Mrs. Hardman (nie Webber) 1887 

Miss A. B. Darling . 1904 

Postal DepartmeifU, 

Miss B. L. Smalley . . 1888 

Mission EoTne, 

Miss G. M. Muir . . . 1887 

Miss L. Smith . . . 1895 



Miss M. E. Cox . . . 1899 

Miss P. B. De Long (pro tern,) 1904 

Hospital, 

T. J. Hollander . . . 1892 

Mrs. Hollander (71^ Thomas) 1894 

Miss L. A. Batty . . . 1895 

Scandinavian Work, 

A, E, Rydherg , , , 1891 
Mrs, Rydberg (n4e Ndrd- 

strdm) .... 1891 

CHIN-KIANG, 18§9. 

G. A. Cox, L.B.C.P. k S. . 1888 

Mrs. Cox (nie Thomas) . 1888 
J. E. Williams, M.B.C.S., 

L.B.C.P. . . . 1890 

Mrs. Williams (nie Lloyd) . 1890 

Miss E. Bradfield . . . 1888 

Miss G. Bees. . . . 1897 

Miss Mary Allen . . . 1899 

Miss A. Whittome . . 1908 

Miss V. Lyle . . . 1904 



110 



CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 



1. YANGJ-OHOW, 1868. 



A. B. Saunders 


1887 


Mrs. Saunders {fUe Smith) 


. 1890 


Miss A. Henry 


1891 


Miss £. S. Olough 


1891 


Miss £. A. Ogden . 


. 1895 


Miss M. King (ahserU) . 


. 1896 


J. S. Orr 


. 1898 


• Mrs. Orr (ti^ Farmer) 


. 1898 


Mrs. A. L. Shapleigh 


. 1904 


T^raining Home, 




Miss M. Murray 


. 1884 


Miss F. Cole . 


. 1894 


Miss I. M. A. Ellmers . 


. 1899 



1. KAO-YU, 1881J. 
Vacant, 

1. TSINGKIANG-PU, 1869. 

W. Shackleton, B.A., M.D., 

B.Ch 1901 

Mrs. Shackleton (71^ Knights) 1901 

Miss I. A. Bobson . 1895 

Miss M. £. Waterman (ahaevU ) 1896 

Miss L. I. Weber . . 1898 

1. AN-TUNG, 1893. 

Miss M. A. Beid . . 1896 

Miss G. Triidinger . 1896 

MissE. Trudinger. . 1899 

Miss £. A. Morton . 1904 



Province of S][-chuan 

Areot 218,480 aqvare miles ; Population, 68,724,890, or 314 per sqvare mile, 

O.I.M. Work commenced 1877. 

Superintendent of Eastern Section, Bishop Cassels. 

Superintendent of Western Section, Dr. Parbt ; Assistant, J. Vale. 

26 Stations; 111 Out-stations; 105 Missionabies (9 on Furlough) ; 
162 Native Helpers ; 1976 Oommunioants. 

Postal Address, direct to Stations, via camng-klng, West Ohlna. Those marked 1, to 

caumg-kliig ; 2, via I-ohang and Wan-hslen. 

SUI FU, 1888. 
A. H. Faers .... 



CHUNG-KING, 1877. 

H. Parry, M.R.O.S., L.R.C.P. 1884 

Mrs. rarry {n4e Broman) . 1884 

A. H. Broomhall . . . 1884 

Mrs. Broomhall (riAe Miles) 1887 

Miss I. W. Ramsay . 1887 

R. B. Whittlesey . . 1895 

Mrs. Whittlesey {n4e Withey) 1893 

H.H. Curtis. . . . 1894 

Miss K M. Miller . . 1901 

KIANG-TSIN, 1902. 

H. J. Squire .... 1894 

Mrs. Squire 1894 

LU-CHOW, 1890. 

T.James .... 1885 

W.T.Herbert . . . 1898 

Mrs. Herbert (n^ Livingston) 1898 

F. Bird 1902 

Miss E. H. A. Spiller . . 1902 

SIAO-SHIH, 1899. 

— LU-OHOW. 

A. H. Barham . . . 1898 

Mrs. Barham {nSe Grabowsky) 1895 

R. L. Mclntyre . . . 1902 



. 1887 

Mrs. Faers (n^ Hook) . 1887 

1. FU-SHUN, 1902. 

W.S. Strong . . . 1892 

Mrs. Strong {nde Blick) . 1901 

Miss K A. GbuTille . . 1902 

S. Glanville .... 1904 

KIATING, 1888. 

B. Ririe .... 1887 
Mrs. Ririe (7K<^ Bee) . . 1891 

E. G. Toyne (ahsewt) , 1895 

C. H. Coates .... 1903 

TO-CHIEN-LO, 1897. 

T. Sorenson .... 1896 
Mrs. Sorenson (nSe C. Ras- 

mussen) .... 1902 

CHIUNG-CHOW, 1902. 

— Chbn-tu. 

F. Olsen {dbsewt) , , . 1896 
Mrs. Olsen {nie Eirkwood) 

(dbsenJt) .... 1896 



STATIONS AND MISSIONARIES 



111 



T. Torrance . 
J. W. WBbster 
Mrs. Webster (lUk Pophun) 
CHEN-TU, 1881. 
J. V&le (abaenl) . 

Mrs. Vala (nA Bridgwater) 

A. Grainser .... 

Mrs. Gningsr (n& Bromui) 

MUa M. Nibaon . 

J. H. Ednr . 

Mrs. £dgar (nA L. Tru- 

dinger) . 

G. M. Franok 

J. K Hnir . 

KWAK-HSIEN, 188S. 
J. HntsoQ {abujU] . 

Mrs. Haitian {nA Widgery) 

(abtenl) . 

W. H. Hookman . 

Mrs. Hockmon {Mrs. Hosts, 

nie Rogers) 

2. PAO-NIKG. 188fl. 
Bishop Caaaels {absent) 
Mrs. Caisela {lUe I>egg) 
(ahsenl) . 
Mias M. E. Booth . 
W. H. AldiB . 

Hrs. Aldis {nie Carrsr) 
Miss E. Turner 



1890 
1897 
1899 
1899 
189B 
1902 
1905 



2. 81N-TIEN-T8I, J 
—Pi 
Miu F. M. WiUiuna 
Miss H. Davies 
Miss B. J. Pemberton . 

2. NAN-PU, 1902. 
Misa F. H. OnlTsrwell 
Miss F. Uojd 
Hiss K. H. AldiB . 

Z Y1NG-8HAN, 1898. 

Miss E. Culverwell {ab*mt) 



2. CHU-HSIEN, 1898. 
C. F. £. Davis 

Mrs. Davis (nA Kobert*) 
Uias U. E. Fearon 
MiH M. E. Waters 



2. SHUN-KING, 1898. 

A. E. Evans .... 1890 

Mrs. Evans {nU Griut) . 139fi 

Miss L. BioWdson . 1900 

2. KWANG-YUAN, 1889. 

— Pao-mino. 

Miss E. H. Allibone . 1898 

Hiss E. M. Taoker . . 1899 

2. PA-CHOW, 1887. 

— Pao-nino. 
Miu HUdat Jahaaaim . . 1891 
Hisa M. J. Williama . 1893 

Hiss F. J. Page . . 1897 

Hiss H. A. Ooagh . 1902 

2. HSU-TING, 1899. 

Wm. Wilson, M.B., CM. . 1882 

Mrs. Wilson (vAe Haiibury) 1887 



A.T. Polhill, M.J 

Mra. PolhiU (nA Drake} 
Hiss F. J. Fowle . 
Hiss E. Drake 
H. G. Thompson . 

2. EAI-HSIEN, 1902. 
— Wah-hbii 

H. Wupperfsld . 

Mrs. Wapperfeld (txe 

Crauoher) . . . 1891 

Hiss A. A. Hart . . 1901 

2. LIANG-SHAN, 1902. 

G. Bogera .... 1399 

Hrs. Bogers {nie Amott) . 1897 

2. WAN-HSIEN, 1888. 



1884 



189S 



■W.C. Taylor . . . 
Mra. Taylor . 

Hiss L. M. Wilson 

Miss H. H. Scorer. . . 


189! 
1891 
1898 
1904 
1904 


Z. KWEI-FD, 1903. 




Hiss P. A. Barclay . . 
Miss A. £. Allen . 

Miss Lena Clarke . 


1889 

1904 
1904 


2. UIN-YANG, 1B06. 

— KWBI 

0. H. Parsona, B.A. . 

W. Jennings. . . . 


Fir. 
1890 
1897 


2. U-8HAN. 190S. 

— KWBI 

J. c. putt . . . . 

Mrs. PlaU (nU Hunt) 


rtr. 
ISBC 
18S7 



112 



CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 



Province of Kwei-chow 

Area^ 67,160 square miles; Population, 7,650,282, or Wiper squ^are mile. 

C.I.M. Work commenced 1877. 

6 Stations ; 13 Out-stations ; 24 Missionaries (3 on Furlough) ; 
24 Nativb Helpers ; 279 Communicants. 

Postal AddrsBB, Kwei-yang, via To-chow. Those marked 1, direct to Station, via 
Ohung-king ; 2, via To^how ; 3, via To-ohow and Kwei-yang. 



KWEI-YANG, 1877. 

G. Cecil-Smith 

Mrs. Smith {lUe Roberts) . 
Miss L. E. Eohler . 
Miss F. E. Pusser . 
Miss E. M. Godbold 

C. Freeman Davies 

Work among Aborigines, 

S. R. Clarke .... 
Mrs. Clarke (n4e Faussett) . 

2. CHEN-YOAN, 1904. 

D. W. Crofts, B.A., B.D., B.Sc. 
Mrs. Crofts {tUe Hammaren) 

3. AN-SHUN, 1888. 

J. R. Adam .... 
Mrs. Adam (n^e Anderson) 
Miss I. Ross .... 
H. J. Hewitt (aifserU) 



TUH-SHAN, 1893. 



1891 


B. Curtis Waters . 


1887 


1890 


Mrs. Waters (n^ Mclnnes) 


1902 


1899 


D. F. Rke .... 


1902 


1903 






1903 
1904 


2. PANG-HAI, 1897. 


* 




—Chen-yuan. 


1878 


R. Williams .... 


1890 


1878 


1. TSEN-I FU, 1902. 




1895 


W. L. Pruen, L.R.C.P. k S. 




1893 


{absent) .... 
Mrs. Pruen {n^ Hughes) 


1880 




{a^bsent) .... 


1876 


1887 


T. Windsor .... 


1884 


1889 


Mrs. Windsor (tk^ Hastings) 


1891 


1890 


Miss L. Hastings . 


1894 


1895 


Miss L. Boulter . 


1903 



Province of Yun-nan 

Area, 146,680 square miles; Population, 12,324,574, or Si per square mile, 

C.I.M. Work commenced 1877. Superintendent, John McCarthy. 

5 Stations ; 23 Missionaries (4 on Furlouoh) ; 5 Native Helpers ; 

25 Communicants. 

Postal Address, Ton-nan Fu, via Laokay, Tonkin. 1, Teng-yueh, via Bhamo ; 

2, Bliamo, direct to Station. 



YUN-NAN FU, 1882. 

0. Stevenson .... 1883 
Mrs. Stevenson (n4e Dunsdon ) 1896 

J. Graham . . . .1890 
Mrs. Graham (rt4e McMinn) 1891 

F. H. Rhodes (ahserU) . . 1894 
Mrs. Rhodes {n4e Boston) 
(absent) . . . .1899 

A. G. Nicholls . . . 1894 

Gladstone Forteous . . 1904 



CHU-TSING, 1889. 

— YUN-NAN. 

J. McCarthy .... 1867 

H. A. C. Allen . . . 1889 

Mrs. Allen (n^ Aspinall) . 1890 

Miss A. M. Simpson . . 1893 

D. J. Harding (dbsent) . . 1895 

Mrs. Harding {n^ Carsley) 

(absent) . • . . , 1896 



STATIONS AND MISSIONARIES 



113 



PING-I, 1904. 

— YUN-NAN. 

W. J. Hanna . . . 1902 

Mrs. Hanna (n4e R. H. Wood) 1902 

G. A. Fleischmann . . 1902 

1. TA-LI, 1881. 

H. McLean .... 1901 

Mrs. McLean (n^e Bengtsson) 1901 



W. J. Embery 
W. T. Clark, M.D. 



1901 
1902 



2. BHAMO (UPPER BURMAH), 
1875. 



Thomas Selkirk 
Mrs. Selkirk 



1889 
1891 



Province of Hu-peh 

Areaj 71,410 square miles; Population, 35,280,685, or ^92 per square mile. 

C.I.M. Work commenced 1874. 

4 Stations ; 4 Out-stations ; 15 Missionakibs ; 17 Native 

Helpers ; 98 Communicants. 
Postal Address, direct to Station, via Han-kow. 

LAO-HO-KEO, 1887. 

A. W. Lagerquist . . . 1890 

Mrs. lagerquist {Mrs. A. 

W. Gusta/son) . . 1891 

C. E. Parsons . . . 1903 



HAN-KOW, 1889. 




Lewis Jones . 


. 1892 


Mrs. Jones {n^ Ardem) 


. 1893 


F. Tull .... 


. 1897 


Mrs. Tull(?i^ Tree) . 


1898 


Miss A. L SaltmarsL 


. 1900 


I-CHANG, 1895. 




G. F. Row . 


. 1898 


Mrs. Row {n6e Clark) . 


. 1898 



{SI'KUAN.) 

Miss Black . 
Miss J. Black 
Miss E. Black 



1884 
1883 
1884 



KUH-CH*ENG, 1903. 

— Lao-ho-keo. 
H. A. Sibley .... 1891 
Mrs. Sibley .... 1891 



Province of Kiang-si 

Area, 69,480 square miles; Populatiorif 26,532,125, or 382 per square mile. 

C.I.M. Work commenced 1869. 
Superintendents, A. Okr-Ewing and Ed. Peasse. 

26 Stations ; 66 Out-stations ; 92 Missionaries (8 on Furlough) ; 

131 Native Helpers ; 1618 Communicants. 

Postal Address, Kiu-kiang. Those marked 1, direct to Station, via Eiu-kiang ; 

2, via Ning-po. 

1. NAN-KANG FU, 1887. 

6. H. Duflf .... 1888 
Mrs. Duff (rUe Fitzsimmons) 1888 



KIU-KIANG, 1889. 

A. Orr-Ewing . . 1886 

Mrs. Orr-Ewing (rUe Ferri- 

man) .... 1887 

D.J.Mills .... 1887 

Mrs. Mills {n4e Clare) . 1889 

1. KU-LING, 1898. 

J. J. Coulthard . . . 1879 

Mrs. Coulthard (nie Walker) 1893 

TA-KU-TANG, 1873. 

J. T. Reid .... 1888 

Mrs. Reid .... 1888 



RAO-CHOW, 1898. 

E. Pearse .... 1876 

F. H. Judd, M.B., CM. (a6«ew<) 1896 
TAT9.Judd(n^Wood){absent) 1896 

R. A. McCulloch . . . 1898 

C. Howard Judd, Junr. . . 1899 

Mrs. Judd (n^ Takken) . 1899 

I 



CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 



1. AN-BEN, 1SS9. 
UiBS K. Fleming . 
Hiss E. Fonberg . 
Miss E. Bnrtoa . 
lliu J. B. Jnmea . 

1. TUNG-HSLUIQ, 1B03. 



1. KWEICHI, 1878. 
Uisa N. Harchbank . 
Mies L. SejnioDr . 
Miss 0. M. Blfkkely 
Miss A. Q. Leitb . 
Miss J. R. Anderson 

1. SHANG-TSIKG, 1893. 
— KwEI-K 
Miss I. Oonnack {absent) 
Hiss F. L. CoUini . 
Miss A. C. Lay . 

1. 1-YANG. 1890. 
Hiss R. UcEenzie . 
Hiss M. E. Standen [aiaenl) . 
Miss C. C. Macdonald . 
Miss O. Dring 
Miss E. E. Cooko . 

1. HO-KOtr. 1878. 
Miss A. Gibson 
Miss F. E. McOnlloch . 
Miss E. E. Hall {abserU} 
Miss Harisn Fiahe 
UissA. C. Skow . 

2. KWANG-HSIN FU, 1901. 
Hbu C. McFarlane (abaeiU) 



2. YANO-EOU, i: 

Miss G. Irrio 
Hiss A. A. Davis . 
MissE. G. Tajlor. 

a. YU-SHATT, 1877. 
Miss A. M. Jobaonscn . 
Miss M. Snter 
Miss L. M. Cane 
Hiss A Rehnberg . 
Miss B. E. Lajns . 

1. KAN-CHOW, 1899. 
W. 8. Horns , 

Mrs. Home (ncSe Turner) 



J. C. Hall .... 

Mrs. Hall {nde Blacklaws) . 
G. J. MaiBhaU 

Mrs. Marshsll (n^ J. A. 

Smith) .... 

W. E. Tyler .... 

E. W. Portcons 
J. L. Rows .... 

1. LONG-CH'DAN, 1904. 
— Wan.ba* 

C. A. Bnnting . . 

Mrs. Banting (nA Banoe) . 
1. HSIN-FENG, 1S9B. 
J. Meikle 

Mrs. Ueikle {nie Elolseu) . 

A. Mart; (abaetit) . . . 

1. CHI-AN FU, 1891. 

W. Taylor .... 

Mrs. Taylor {nic Gardiner) . 
Miss M. A. Wood . 
Miss H. H. Dnncan 

1. YUHG-SIN, 1899. 

— Gai-AN F 
ifiss E. Cajander . 
Afiaa A. E. EhratrOm . 
ifiia E. E. Ingiacm 

1. YUAH-CHOW, 1903. 

J. Lawson . . . . 

Urt. Laweon (lUt Cowley) 

(abteat) .... 

1. LINKIANG, 1898. 

G. Domay . . . . ' 

F. Tranb .... 
Mrs. Tranb {lUt Bmnn- 

schweiler) 
a Woblleber. 
J. K. Braucbli 

1. CHANG.8HU, 1895. 
F. BlSsner ..... 
Mrs. Blasner (tiA Elban) 
1. NAN-FENG, 1903. 

— Ckiekk^haho. 
H. PfannemQUer . 
Jfr». lyannemiaieT (n& Hal- 

Adam Seipel 

1. CHIEN-CHANG, 1899. 
O. F. A. KrUnJle . 
Mri. Krienkt {nie Callaen) . 



STATIONS AND MISSIONARIES 



115 



1. FU-CHOW 1899. 

F, Manz .... 1892 

Mrs, Manz {n4e Hausberg) . 1896 

Miss E. Wartmcmn . 1903 

F. M&Mh .... 1908 



1. NAN-CHANG, 1898. 

A. E. Thor .... 1890 
Mrs. Thor {nie Karlsm) . 1891 



Province of Ngan-hwei 

Area, 54,810 square miles; PoptUcUiorif 23,670,314, or iZ2 per sqimre mile, 

C.I.M. Work commenced 1869. 

12 Stations ; 29 Out-stations ; 46 Missionaries (7 on Furlough) ; 
68 Native Helpers ; 652 Communicants. 

Postal Address, direct to Stations, via Wu-hu. Those marked 1, via Ta-tnng ; 
2, direct to Station ; 3, via Ngan-ldn ; 4, to Shanghai. 

KIEN-PING, 1894. 

W. G. Bobby . . . 1892 

Mrs. Bobby (n4e Moore) . 1893 

Miss R. E. Oakeshott . . 1889 

Miss F. Saaz^ . . . 1890 

1. HWEI-CHOW, 1876. 

G. W. Gibb, M.A. . . . 1894 

Mrs. Gibb {n^e Emslie) . 1892 

A. W. Mead .... 1904 

8. LAI-AN, 1899. 

— Chu-ohow. 

C. Best 1892 

Mrs. Best {n^ Faulds) . 1898 
Miss E. A. Potter . . . 1904 

LIU-AN-CHOW, 1890. 

W. E. Entwistle . . . 1891 

Mrs. Entwistle {n^ Buchan) 1889 

E. Young .... 1901 

CHEN- YANG-KUAN, 1887. 
J. A. Beutel .... 1898 

YING-CHOW FU, 1897. 

C. B. Barnett . . . 1894 

Mrs. Barnett {n^ Ferguson) 1898 

J. H. Mellow . . . 1905 

TAI-HO, 1892. 

W. B. Malcolm {abseTU) . 1895 

Mrs. Malcolm (nks A. 

A xrwAT^jp TT? iQon Triidinger) (a&jen^) . . 1897 

4. KWANG-TE, 1890. g^ g perguson . . . 1895 

H. H. Taylor . . . 1881 Mrs. Ferguson {n^ Cobb) . 1892 

Mrs. Taylor {nie Gray) . 1884 Miss E. M. Rowe . . . 1902 



2. NGAN-KIN, 1869. 




W. Westwood 
Mrs. Westwood (n^e March- 
bank) . . . . 
A. V. Gray . . . . 
H. J. Mungeam . 


1892 

1892 
1897 
1904 


Training Home. 




A. Bland . . . . 

Mrs. Bland {n^ Dunn) 
J. W. Wilcox {a^seiU) . 

Mrs. Wilcox (rUe Pasmore] 
{absent) . . . . 


1887 
1897 
1896 

1896 


1. CHIH-CHOW, 187^ 


L 


Miss H. L. Beid . 
Miss Lilias Beid . 
Miss H. M. Loveless 


1895 
1896 
1904 


2. WU-HU, 1894. 




C. T. Fishe . . . . 

Mrs. Fisbe (n^ Josephine 

Smith) . . . . 

A. Duffy . . . . 

Mrs. Duflfy {n^ Stedman) . 


1869 

1894 
1888 
1890 


NING-KUO FU, 1874 


• 


G. Miller {absent) . 

Mrs. Miller {nie Mitchell) 
(absent) . . . . 
H. E. Foucar . . . . 

Mrs. Foucar {n4e Olding) . 
Miss B. Webster . 
Miss C. Readshaw . 
Miss G. Banks 


1884 

1887 
1891 
1888 
1895 
1902 
1902 



116 



CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 



Province of Cheh-kiang 

Arta, 36,670 ^quart miles; Population, 11,580|692, or Z\^ per Bquare mile, 

C.I.M. Work commenced 1857. Superintendent, J. J. Meadows. 

29 Stations; 216 Out-stations; 80 Missionaries (12 on Furlough); 

406 Native Helpers ; 5233 Communicants. 

Postal Addreii, direot to Stationi. ThOM marked 1, via Ning-po ; 2, yia 



Hang-ohow ; 8, via Wan-ohow ; 4, CSiu-ohow, Tia Wen-ohow. 



2. SHAO-HSING, 1866. 

J. J. Meadows . . 1862 

W. H. Warren . . . 1892 

Mrs. Warren (nie Meadows) 1895 

Miss Meadows . . 1887 

Miss L. Meadows . . 1900 

1. HSIN-CHANG, 1870. 

Miss S. E. Jones (ahseiit) . 1886 

W. J. Doherty . . .1894 

Mrs. Doherty {n4e Davidge) 1897 

HANG-OHOW, 1866. 
Pastor Ren. 

MO-KAN-SHAN, 1901. 

A. Langman {cibsent) . . 1884 
Mrs. Langman {rUe Williams) 

(dbae'n^ .... 1884 

NING-PO, 1867. 

J. Palmer .... 1896 

Mrs. Palmer {nie Blything) 1898 

W. W. Robertson . . . 1897 

Mrs. Robertson {n6e Gold) . 1897 

1. FENG-HUA, 1866. 

A. Miller {ahs^) . . 1894 

W. A. McRoberts . . 1904 

A. K. Macpherson 1904 

1. NINGHAI, 1868. 

K. McLeod .... 1897 

Mrs. McLeod (rUe Richer) . 1899 

Miss E. L. Bennett {absevit) . 1898 

Miss M. E. Funk . . . 1903 

1. TIEN-TAI, 1898. 

A. 0. Loosley . . 1900 
Mrs. Loosley (nie Macpher- 
son) . . . .1898 

1. TAI-CHOW, 1867. 

W. D. Rudland . . 1866 

J. A. Anderson, M.D. (U.S.A.) 1889 

Mrs. Anderson, M.D. (U.S.A.) 

(71^ Ross) . . . 1893 

Miss A. R. Rudland . 1905 



1. HUANG- YEN, 1896. 

C. Tliomson .... 
Mrs. Thomson {nie Graves) 

1. LU-CHIAO, 1900. 
Miss E. Ralston . 

1. TAI-PING, 1898. 

W. Richardson {ahsent) . 
Mrs. Richardson (n^ Britton) 
{absent) .... 
J. G. Eauderer 



1892 
1894 



1898 



1894 

1887 
1897 



Mrs. Eauderer {nie B. Reid) 1903 



1. HSIEN-CHtT, 1899. 

• • • 

{nie Mary 



A. B. Wilson 
Mrs. Wilson 
Smith) . 



WEN-CHOW, 1867. 

Mrs. Stott {nie Ciggie) . 
E. Hunt 

Mrs. Hunt (nie Whitford) 
Mrs. Menzies (nie Chalmers) 
Miss E. B. Stayner 
Miss F. A. M. Young . 
G. H. Seville, B.A. 

Mrs. Seville (Mrs. Greene) 
Miss A. E. Eldridge 



1897 
1901 



1870 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1893 
1899 
1902 
1899 
1904 



3. BING-YAE, 1874. 

— Wen-chow. 

R. Grierson .... 1885 

Mrs. Grierson {nie Sherman ) 1899 

SHUI-AN, 1905. 

W. Grundy .... 1896 

E. C. Searle .... 1896 

Mrs. Searle {nie Johnston) . 1899 

3. CHU-CHOW, 1876. 

0. Schmidt .... 1892 

Mrs, Schmidt (nie MiUler) , 1892 



STATIONS AND MISSIONARIES 



117 



3. LUNG-CH'UAN, 1894. 

J, Bender (absent) . . . 1890 
Mrs, Bender {rUe SchmUgen) 

(absent) . . .1890 

George Milller . . . 1902 
E. Maag .... 1903 

3. CHIN-YUN, 1898. 

B. Bohm .... 1896 

Mrs, Bohm {n6e Sichel- 

schmidt) .... 1896 

Miss L, Duerr . . . 1902 

Miss B, StucH . . . 1904 

4. YUN-HO, 1895. 

Miss Bdumer .... 1890 
Miss K, Kahlofer . . . 1904 

3. SUNG-YANG, 1896. 

H, Klein .... 1893 
Mrs, Klein (nie SehiUten- 

hussel) .... 1896 

Miss A, Hoffmann . . 1904 

1. YUNG-KANG, 1882. 
A. Grade .... 1887 
Mrs. Gracie (n4e Waldie) . 1887 



A. Hammond (absent) , 
Miss A. Tranter (absent) 
Miss G. E. Brooking 

1. KIN-HUA, 1876. 

F. Dickie .... 
Mrs. Dickie (n^ Young) , 

1. LAN-CHI, 1894. 

Miss E. J. Palmer . 
Miss E. S. Twizell . 

2. YEN-CHOW, 1902. 
C. Fairclough (absent) . 

2. TONG-LU, 1901. 
J. B. Miller .... 

1. CHO-CHOW, 1872. 
W. Emslie 



1893 
1895 
1904 



1889 
1888 



1891 
1901 



1898 



1895 



1892 



Mrs. Emslie (n4e Cnthbert) 1896 
1. CHANG-SHAN, 1878. 



Miss Guex 
Mdme. Just . 



1889 
1900 



Province of Hu-nan 

Area, 83,380 square miles; Population^ 22,169,673, or 2^^ per square mile, 

C.I.M. Work commenced — Itinerations from 1875 ; Settled Work, 1898. 

5 Stations ; 5 Out-stations ; 25 Missionakies (5 on Fuklottgh) ; 
17 Native Helpers ; 166 Communicants. 

Postal Address, direct to Stations, via To-ohow. 



CHANG-TEH, 1898. 

T. A. P. Clinton . . 1894 

Mra. Clinton (n4e E. F. Bailer) 1901 



W. C. Chapman 

G. F. Draffin 

J. W. Owen . . . . 

CHANG-SHA, 1901. 

F. A. Keller, B.M., M.D. 
(U.S. A.) (dbseni) 

Mrs. Keller (nie Tilley) 
(absent) , 
H. G. Barrie, M.D. (absent) 

Mrs. Barrie (ahsenJt) 
W. E. Hampson . 
Miss E. L. P. Kumm 
Miss Mary Pollock 
Miss M. C. Peterson 



1902 
1903 
1904 



1897 

1898 
1901 
1901 
1899 
1894 
1894 
1898 



Miss E. E. V. Trojahn . . 1908 
Miss Jepsen .... 1904 
Miss Kohrig .... 1904 
Miss I. KuDst . .1904 

A. P. Laycock, M.A., M.B., 

B.CI1 1905 



1900 
1903 
1904 



YUAN-CHOW, 1903. 

Heinrich Witt 

F. K. Heinrichsohn 

H. A. F. Witte 

PAO-CHING FU, 1903. 

F. Kampmann (absent) , , 1897 

F. K. Schoppe . . . 1903 

Mrs. Schoppe (n6e Amdtz) . 1903 

A. H. Franke . . . 1904 



118 



CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 



S. N. Brimley 
C. C. Elliott, M.D 
A. Hermann . 
P. O. Olesen . 
I. Page . 
E. 0. Schild . 



XX Students at An-k'ingf. 

1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1906 
1905 



A. Stanislaw . 


. 1905 


R. K. Veryard 


. 1905 


Owen Warren 


. 1905 


H. G. White . 


. 1906 


S. G. Wiltshire . 


. 1905 



XX Students at Yang^-chau. 



Miss M. Biggam 
Miss A. Gzach 
Miss E. L. Giles . 
Miss A. Grieb 
Miss L. F. M. Jackson 
Miss M. W. Johannsen 



1905 
1905 
1906 
1905 
1905 
1905 



Miss G. Linom 
Miss M. E. Mann 
Miss M. Pearson 
Miss J. Sargeant 
Miss E. M. Yard 



1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 



29 Workers detained at Home. 



In England. 

Miss J. W. Arpiainen . . 1893 
M. Beauchamp, B.A. . . 1885 

Mrs. Beauchamp {7i4e Barclay) 1889 
Mrs, N, Carleson . . . 1898 
Mrs. W. Cooper . . . 1889 
J. A. Heal .... 1885 

Mrs. Heal {n4e Carpenter) . 1888 
Mrs. C. Horobin (lUe Sutherland) 1888 
Mrs. G. Hunter . . . 1890 
Mrs. T. James (Mrs. Rileyi nie 

Stroud) .... 1882 
Mrs. H. N. Lachlan {in4e 

Mackintosh) . . . 1884 
Mrs. J. McCarthy . . .1867 
Miss C. K. Murray . . 1884 
Mrs. E. Pearse {nie Goodman) 1876 
Miss H! C. Permiin . . 1897 



Miss G. Rudland . . . 1896 

Mrs. Schofield . . . 1880 

Miss E. M. Smith . . . 1899 

Mrs. J. W. Stevenson . . 1866 

In America. 

F. H. Neale .... 1895 

Mrs. Neale (nie Thomas) . 1898 

F. H. Taylor, M.D., F.R.C.S. 1890 

Mrs. Taylor {n6e Guinness) 1888 

Mrs, Henriksen . . . 1892 

A, WUzell .... 1891 

Mrs, WUzell {n6e Anderson) 1891 

In Australia. 

R. Powell .... 1896 
A. H. Sanders . .1895 

Miss F. Young . . 1891 



2X on Home Staff. 



In England (JEToww Staff), 

Walter B. Sloan . . . 1891 

Mrs. Sloan {nde Brown) . 1888 

F. Marcus Wood . . .1883 
Mrs. Wood (nSe Williams) . 1883 

G. Graham Brown . . . 1886 
Mrs. Brown (n& Fenton) . 1886 

M. Broomhall, B.A. . . 1890 

Mrs. BroomhaU (n4e Cor- 

deroy) .... 1894 

Miss K. I. Williamson . . 1887 

T. W. Goodall . . . 1890 

Mrs. Goodall (nie Johnson) 1887 



C. H. Judd . 
Mrs. Judd . 



1868 
1868 



In America [Home Staff), 

J. F. Broumton . . • 1876 

F. A. Steven. . . . 1883 

Mrs. Steven (n^ Tapscott) . 1886 

Miss L. G. Albertson . . 1899 

In Australia {Home Staff), 

J. Southey .... 1891 

Mrs. Southey . . . 1891 

J. H. Todd .... 1895 

Mrs. Todd (n6e Chambers) . 1894 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF MISSIONARIES 

With the provinces in which they are labouring. On pages 103-118 
the names of missionaries are arranged according to their stations and 
provinces. 



Adam, J. R. and Mrs. 
*Ahlm/in, Miss 0. G, W. 
ZAhlstrand, G. and Mrs, 

Ahlstrbm, Miss T. . 

Albertson, Miss L. G^ 

Aldis, Miss E. M. . 

Aldis, W. H. and Mrs. 

Allen, Miss A. R. . 

Allen, H. A. G. and 
Mrs. . 

Allen, Miss Maiy 

AUibone, Miss K, H. 

Alty, H. J. 

Ambler, P. V. . 

Andersen, Miss T. E. 

XAndersen, Miss G. S, 

XAnderson, Miss C. . 

XAnderson, G, J, and 

Mrs, . 

* Anderson f Miss E, . 
i Anderson, Miss E, K, 

Anderson, Geo. A. . 
*Andersom,y Miss I. E. 

Anderson, Dr. J. A. 
and Mrs. 
Anderson, Miss J. R. . 
fAndersonf Miss K, . 

* Anderson, K, R, 

X Anderson, Miss if. . 
fAnderz^, G, A, and 
Mrs, . 

Andrew, G. and Mrs. 
\\Angvik, Miss G, 

Angwin, Miss R. 

Anniss, Miss H. 

Aplin, Miss H. G. . 

Argento, A. and Mrs. 

Argento, Miss C. 

Arnott, Mrs. A. £. . 
zArpiainen, Miss J, W, 



Kwei-chow 

Shen-si 

Shen-si 

Shan-tong 

America 

Si-chuan 

Si-chuan 

Si-chuan 

Yun-nan 

Kiang-su 

Si-chuan 

Shan-tong 

Shan-si 

Ho-nan 

Kan-suh 

Shen-si 

Shen-si 
Shan-si 
Shan-si 
Ho-nan 
Shan-si 

Cheh-kiang 

Kiang-si 

Shan-si 

Ho-nan 

Shen-si 

Shan-si 

Kan-suh 

Shen-si 

Shan-tong 

Si-chuan 

Shan-tong 

Ho-nan 

Ho-nan 

Shan-tong 

England 



Bailer, Miss A. M. . 
Baller,F. W. andMrs. 
Bailer, Miss M. L. . 
Banks, Miss G. 
Barber, E. O. . 
Barclay, Miss P. A. . 
Barham, A. H. and 

Mrs. . 
Barnett, C. B. and Mrs. 
Barraclough, Miss 

M. E. . 
Barrie, Dr. H. G. 

and Mrs. 
Batterham, Miss M. . 
Batty, Miss L. A. . 
^Bdurner, Miss E. 
Beauchamp, M. and 

Mrs. . 
XBeckman, R, and Mrs, 
Begg, Miss Jessie . 
*Beinhoff, E, 0, 
Belcher, W. M. and 

Mrs. . 
^Bender, J, amd Mrs, 
XBengtsson, 0, . 
Bennett, Miss E. L. 
*Berg, A. and Mrs. , 
*Bergling, A. R, and 

Mrs, . 
XBergstrom, S, and 

Mrs, , 
Beschnidt, Miss M. . 
Best, C. and Mrs. . 
Beutel, J. A. . 
Bevis, E. G. and Mrs. 
Biggam, Miss M. 
Bird, C. Howard 
Bird, Fred. 
Black, Miss 
Black, Miss E. . 



Shan-tong 

Shan-tong 

Shan-tong 

N"gan-hwei 

Shan-si 

Si-chuan 

Si-chuan 
Nga'n-hwei 

Shan-si 

Hu-nan 
Shen-si 
Kiang-su 
Cheh-kiang 

England 
Kan-suh 
Shan-tong 
Ho-nan 

Kan-suh 

Cheh-kiang 

Shen-si 

Cheh-kiang 

Shan-si 

Shen-si 

Shen-si 

Shan-tong 

Ngan-hwei 

Ngan-hwei 

Ho-nan 

Kiang-su 

Ho-nan 

Si-chuan 

Hu-peh 

Hu-peh 



119 



120 



CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 



Black, Miss J. . 

Blackmore, Miss L. . 

Blakely, Miss G. M. 

Bland, A. and Mrs. . 

Blasner, F. and Mrs. 
*Blom, C, and Mrs, . 

Bobby, W. G. and Mrs. 
*Bdmng, T, B, J. and 
Mrs, . 

Booth, Miss M. £. . 
*Bord8onf Miss M, C, 

Botham, Mrs. T. £. . 

Boulter, Miss L. 

Boyd, Miss E. G. . 

Bradfield, Miss £. . 

Branchli, J. K. 

Brimley, S. N. 

Briscoe, W. F. H. . 

Brock, J. and Mrs. . 

Brooking, Miss G. £. 

Broomhall, A. H. and 
Mrs. . 

Broomhall, M. and 
Mrs. 

Broumton, J. F. 

Brown, G. G. and 
Mrs. 

Brown, Miss M. 0. . 

Bunting, C. A. and 

Mrs. . 
* Bur en, Miss E* A,E. 

Burgess, 0. and Mrs. 

Bum, Miss E. F. . 

Burton, Miss E. 

Button, Miss L. C. . 

Cable, Miss A. M. . 
zCajander, Miss E, . 

Cameron, Mrs. . 

Cane, Miss L. M. 
^Garlin, Oscar . 
YCarleson, Mrs, N. . 

Carlyle, Miss L. 

Carr, Miss H. £. 

Carr, Dr. S. H. and 
Mrs. . 

Carwardine, C. and 
Mrs. . 

Cassels, Bishop W. W. 

Cassels, Mrs. . 

Cecil-Smith, G. and 
Mrs. . 

Chapman, W. C. 
XGhristensen, J, A, . 

Churcher, Miss £. J. 

Clark, Dr. W. T. . 

Clarke, G. W. and 
Mrs. . 



Hu-peh 

Shan-tong 

Kiang-si 

Ngan-hwei 

Kung-si 

Ho-nan 

Ngan-hwei 

Shen-si 

Si-chuan 

Shan-si 

Chih-U 

Kwei-chow 

Shan-tong 

Kiang-su 

Kiang-si 

Ngan-hwei 

Shan-si 

Ho-nan 

Cheh-kiang 

Si-chuan 

England 
America 

England 
Kiang-si 

Kiang-si 

Ho-nan 

Shen-si 

Shan-tong 

Kiang-si 

Shan-tong 

Shan-si 

Kiang-si 

Shan-tong 

Kiang-si 

Shan-si 

England 

Kiang-si 

Shan-si 

Ho-nan 

Shen-si 

Si-chuan 

Si-chuan 

Kwei-chow 

Hu-nan 

Shen-si 

Si-chuan 

Yun-nan 

Chih-li 



Clarke, Miss Lena 
Clarke, S. R. and Mrs 
fClasson, J, L, . 
Clinton, T. A. P. and 

Mrs. . 
Clough, Miss E. S. 
Coates, C. H. . 
Cole, Miss F. . 
Coleman, Miss I. M. 
Collins, Miss F. L. 
Conway, H. S. and 

Mrs. . 
Cooke, Miss K. E. 
Cooper, E. J. . 
Cooper, Mrs. W. 
Cormack, Miss I. 
Coulthard, J. J. and 

Mrs. . 
Cox, Dr. G. A. and 

Mrs. 
Cox, Miss M. E. 
Craig, Miss>I. A. 
Cream, Miss S. A. 
Crofts, D. W. and 

Mrs. . 
Culyerwell, Miss E. 
Culverwell,MissF.H 
Curtis, H. H. . 
Czach, Miss A. 

Darling, Miss A. R. 
Darroch, Miss M. 
Davies, Miss H. 
Davies, C. Freeman 
Davis, Miss A. A. 
Davis, C. F. E. and 

Mrs. . 
De Long, Miss P. R. 
Dickie, F. and Mrs. 
Dodds, Miss^R. L. 
Doherty, W. J. and 

Mrs. . 
Domay, G. 
Douglas • Hamilton, 

Miss E. J. . 
Draffin, G. F. . 
Drake, Miss E. 
Dreyer, F. C. H. and 

Mrs. . 
Dring, Miss Grace 
^Duerr, Miss Lina 
Duff, G. H. and Mrs 
Duffy, A. and Mrs. 
Duncan, Miss H. M. 

Easton, G. F. and 

Mrs. . 
Eklgar, J. H. and Mrs. 



Si-chuan 

Kwei-chow 

Shan-si 

Hu-nan 

Kiang-su 

Si-chuan 

Kiang-su 

Shen-si 

Kiang-si 

Ho-nan 

Kiang-si 

Shan-si 

England 

Kiang-si 

Kiang-si 

Kiang-su 
Kiang-su 
Shan-tong 
Ho-nan 

Kwei-chow 

Si-chuan 

Si-chuan 

Si-chuan 

Kiang-su 

Kiang-su 

Kiang-si 

Si-chuan 

Kwei-chow 

Kiang-si 

Si-chuan 
Kiang-su 
Cheh-kiang 
Shan-si 

Cheh-kiang 
Kiang-si 

Si-chuan 

Hu-nan 

Si-chuan 

Shan-si 

Kiang-si 

Cheh-kiang 

Kiang-si 

Ngan-hwei 

Kiang-si 



Shen-si 
Si-chuan 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF MISSIONARIES Ul 



Edwards, Miss M. A. 
tEhrif P, K arid Mrs, 
zJShrstriim, Miss A. E, 

Eldridge, Miss A. E. 

ElUott, Dr. C. C. . 

Ellmers, Miss I. M. A. 

Embery, W. J. 

Emslie, W. and Mrs. 
XEiu^lundy W. and Mrs, 
*Bngstrdm, Miss S. . 

Entwistle, W. E. and 
Mrs. . 

* Ericsson, A, A, 

* Eriksson, Miss A, . 
Evans, A. E. and Mrs. 

Faers, A. H. and Mrs. 

Faircloueh, C. . 

Falls, John and Mrs. 

Fearon, Miss M. E. . 

Ferguson, H. S. and 
Mrs. . 

Fiddler, J. S. and Mrs. 

Fishe, C. T. and Mrs. 

Fishe, Miss Ethel A. 

Fishe, Miss Marian H. 

Fleischmann, C. A. . 

Fleming, Miss H. B. 

Fleming, Miss K. 
*Folke, E and Mrs, , 

Ford, H. T. and Mrs. 

Forsberg, Miss E. . 
*Forssherg, Miss A, 0, 

Foucar, H. E. and 
Mrs. . 

Fowle, Miss F. J. . 

Franck, G. M. . 

Franke, A. H. . 
iFredberg, G. E. 

French, Miss E. 

Funk, Miss M. E. . 

Garland, Miss A. 
Garland, Miss S. 
Gauntlett, Miss E. . 
Gibb, G. W. and Mrs. 
Gibson, Miss A. 
Giles, Miss E. L. 
Gillies, Robert and 

Mrs. . 
Gilmer, W. T. and Mrs. 
Glanville, Miss E. A. 
Glanville, S. . 
Godbold, Miss E. M. 
Gonder, R. K. . 
Goodall, T. W. and 

Mrs. . 
Goold, A. and Mrs. . 



Shen-si 

Shan-si 

Kiang-si 

Cheh-kiang 

Ngan-hwei 

Kiang-su 

Yun-nan 

Cheh-kiang 

Shen-si 

Ho-nan 

Ngan-hwei 
Shan-si 
Shen-si 
Si'-chuan 

Si-chuan 
Cheh-kiang 
Shan-si 
Si-chuan 

Ngan-hwei 

Kan-suh 

Ngan-hwei 

Shan-tong 

Kiang-si 

Yun-nan 

Kiang-si 

Kiang-si 

Shan-si 

Ho-nan 

Kiang-si . 

Shan-si 

Ngan-hwei 

Si-chuan 

Si-chuan 

Hu-nan 

Shan-si 

Shan-si 

Cheh-kiang 

Kan-suh 

Kan-suh 

Shan-si 

N^an-hwei 

Kiang-si 

Kiang-su 

Shan-si 

Shan-si 

Si-chuan 

Si-chuan 

Kwei-chow 

Shan-si 

England 
Shen-si 



XGothherg, Miss /. A, 
XGothberg, Natkanael 

Gough, Miss H. A. . 

Grade, A. and Mrs. 

Graham, J. and Mrs. 

Grainger, A. and Mrs. 

Gray, A. V. . 

Green, C. H. S. and 
Mrs. . 

Gregg, Miss J. G. 

Grieb, Miss A. . 

Grierson, R. and Mrs. 

Griffith, M. L. and 
Mrs. . 

Grundy, W. 

Guex, Miss M. 

Guinness, Dr. G. W. 

and Mrs. 
fGustafson, Miss A, . 
XGustafson, F, A, and 

Mrs, . 
* Chistafsson, Miss J, , 

Hacking, Miss G. M. 
XS^agqvist, W, and Mrs, 
XJSagsten, Miss H, A, 
*Hahne, A, and Mrs, 

Hall, Miss E. E. 

Hall, J. C. and Mrs. 
*Uallin, MissF. 

Hammond, A. . 

Hampson, W. E. 

Hancock, Miss A. M. 

Hanna, W. J. and Mrs. 

Hannah, C. B. . 

Harding, D. A. G. 
and Mrs. 

Harding, D. J. and 
Mrs. . 

Hardman, M. and Mrs. 

Harman, Miss M. L. S. 

Harrison, Miss A. . 

Hart, Miss A. A. 

Hastings, Miss L. . 
WHa^trem, Miss R, 
\\Hattrem, Miss T, 

Hayward, J. N. and 
Mrs. . 

Heal, J. A. and Mrs. 

Heinrichsohn, F. K. 
XSenriksen, Mrs, 

Henry, Miss A. 

Herbert, W. T. and 
Mrs. . 

Herman, A. 

Hewett, Dr. J. W. . 

Hewitt, H. J. . 

Higgs, Miss Edith . 



Shan-si 

Shan-si 

Si-chuan 

Cheh-kiang 

Yun-nan 

Si-chuan 

Ngan-hwei 

Chih-li 
Chih-li 
Kiang-su 
Cheh-kiang 

Chih-li 

Cheh-kiang 

Cheh-kiang 

Ho-nan 
Shan-si 

Kan-suh 
Shen-si 

Ho-nan 

Shen-si 

Shen-si 

Shan-si 

Kiang-si 

Kiang-si 

Shan-si 

Cheh-kiang 

Hu-nan 

Shan-tong 

Yun-nan 

Si-chuan 

Kan-suh 

Yun-nan 

Kiang-su 

Kan-suh 

Shen-si 

Si-chuan 

Kwei-chow 

Shan-si 

Shen-si 

Kiang-su 

England 

Hu-nan 

America 

Kiang-su 

Si-chuan 

Ngan-hwei 

Kan-suh 

Kwei-chow 

Shan-si 



122 



CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 



XHill, K, R, «/. and Mrs. 

Hjort, Miss B. . . 

Hockman, W. H. and 
Mrs. . 
^HoffmanUf Miss A. . 

Hogg, Dr. A. and Mrs. 
\H6glandert J. D, 
*ff8gm(m, Natharuul 

Hollander, T. J. and 
Mrs. . 

Home, W. S. and Mrs. 

Horobin, Mrs. C. 

Hoskyn, Miss J. F. . 

Hoste, D. E. and Mrs. 

Howell, G.T. and Mrs. 

Hnnnybun, Miss D. 

Hunt, Miss A. . 

Hunt, £. and Mrs. . 

Hunter, Mrs. G. 

Hunter, G. W. 

Hutson, J. and Mrs. 



Shan-si 
Ho-nan 

Si-cliuan 

Cheh-kiang 

Shan-tong 

Shan-si 

Shen-si 

Kiang-su 

Kiang-si 

England 

Shan-si 

Eiang-su 

Eiang-su 

Shan-si 

Shan-si 

Cheh-kiang 

England 

Kan-suh 

Si-chuan 



zlngmarij Miss E. E, . Kiang-si 
Irvin, Miss G. . . Kiang-si 



Jackson, Miss L. F. M. 

James, Miss J. B. . 

James, T. 

James, Mrs. T. 
*Janzon, Miss A. 

Jennings, A. and Mrs. 

Jennings, W. . 
t Jensen, Miss A. 
XJensen, G, J, and Mrs. 

Jepsen, Miss G. 

Johannsen, Miss A. M. 

Johannsen, Miss M. W. 
XJohanson, A, T, 
fJohansonj Miss H, S, 
XJohnson, Emit . 

Johnson, Miss E. C. . 
XJohnson, Miss T. 

Jones, Lewis and Mrs. 

Jones, Miss S. E. 

Joyce, F. S. and Mrs. 

Judd, 0. H. and Mrs. 

Judd, C. Howard and 
Mrs. . 

Judd, Dr. F. H. and 
Mrs. . 

Just, Mrs. L. . 



Kiang-su 

Kiang-si 

Si-chuan 

England 

Ho-nan 

Shan-si 

Si-chuan . 

Shen-si 

Shen-si 

Hu-nan 

Kiang-si 

Kiang-su 

Kan-suh 

Si-chuan 

Shan-si 

Shan-si 

Kan-suh 

Hu-peh 

Cheh-kiang 

Ho-nan 

England 

Kiang-si 

Kiang-si 
Cheh-kiang 



^Kahlkd/er, Miss K, . Cheh-kiang 

Kampmann, F. . Hu-nan 

^KarUson, A. , . Shan-si 
Kauderer, J. G. and 

Mrs. . . . Cheh-kiang 
Keller, Dr. F. A. and 

Mrs. . . . Hu-nan 



Kennett, R. W. and 

Mrs. . 
King, Miss M. . 
King, N. £. and Mrs. 
^KUin, H. and Mrs, . 
Knight, W. P. and 

Mrs. . 
Kohler, Miss L. E. . 
Kohrig, Miss K. E. . 
Kolkenbeck, Miss 

H. M. . . 

^KrUnke, G. F. A. 

and Mrs, 
Kumm, Miss E. L. P. 
Kunst, Miss I. . 

Lachlan, Mrs. H. N. 

Lack, C. N. and Mrs. 

Lagerquist, A. W. 
and Mrs. 

Lajus, Miss B. H. . 

Langman,A. and Mrs. 

Large, A. W. . 
tZar5507i, O, E. 

Lawson, D. and Mrs. 

Lawson, J. 

Lawson, Mrs. . 

Lay, Miss A. C. 

Laycock, Dr. A. P. . 

Leg^at, Miss B. 

Leitn, Miss A. G. . 

Lewis, A. B. . 
*Linder, L, H, E, . 

Lindsay, W. W. and 

Mrs. . 
XLindvallf Miss D, , 

Linom, Miss G. 

Lloyd, Miss F. 

Loosley, A. O. and 
Mrs. . 

Loveless, Miss A. M. 
XLundvallf Miss H. , 

Lutley, A. and Mrs. 

Lyle, Miss Violet . 

Lyons, H. and Mrs. . 

^Maag, E. 

Macdonald, Miss C. C. 

Macdonald, Miss M. 

MacLaren, Miss J. . 

Macleod, K. and Mrs. 

Malcolm, W. R. and 
Mrs. . 

Mann, E. J. 

Mann, Miss M. E. . 
^ManZf F. and Mrs, , 

Msirchbank, Miss N. 

Marshall, G. J. and 
Mrs. . 



Kan-suh 
Kiang-su 
Shan-si 
Cheh-kiang 

Shan-si 

Kwei-chow 

Hu-nan 

Si-chuan 

Kiang-si 
Hu-nan 
Hu-nan 

England 
Ho-nan 

Hu-peh 

Kiang-si 

Cheh-kiang 

Si-chuan 

Shan-si 

Shan-si 

Kiang-si 

Kiang-si 

Kiang-si 

Hu-nan 

Ho-nan 

Kiang-si 

Shen-si 

Shen-si 

Shan-tong 
Shen-si 
Kiang-su 
Si-chuan 

Cheh-kiang 

Ngan-hwei 

Kan-suh 

Siian-si 

Kiang-su 

Shan-si 

Cheh-kiang 

Kiang-si 

Ho-nan 

Kiang-su 

Cheh-kiang 

Ngan-hwei 

Kan-suh 

Kiang-su 

Kiang-si 

Kiang-si 

Kiang-si 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF MISSIONARIES 123 



Uartin, J. B. and Mrs. 
Hart;, Adam . 
Uason, H. J. and Mrs. 
McCarthy, F. aud Mrs. 
MoCarthj, J. . 
McCarthy, Mrs. J. . 
McCuUoch, Misa F. E. 
McCuUocSi, B. A. . 
McFarlaike, Mies C. . 
Mclntyre, E. L. 
McKenzie, Miss R. . 
McEie, G. and Mrs. 
McLean, Hector and 

Mrs. . 
McOwan, B, H. and 



KaD-8uh 

Ean-suh 
Shon-tong 
YuD-uan 
England 

Si-chuan 
Kiang-Bi 
Shan-ai 



Mrs. 

McPherson, A. K. , 

McEobertg, W. A. . 

Mead, A. W. . 

Meadows, J. J. 

Meadows, Miss Lily 

Meadows, Miss Louisa 

Meikle, Johnand Mrs. 

MeUor, Miss A. E. . 

Mellow, J. H. 

Msnzies, Mrs. A. 

Middleton, E. W. 
and Mrs. 

Miller, Alex. . 

Miller, Miaa E. M. . 

Miller, Q. and Mrs. . 

Miller, J. B. . 

Mills, D. J. and Mrs. 

MilsQm, W. R and 
Mrs. . 
HJlfoncA, F. 

Moodie, B. T. and Mrs. 

Morris, Miss F. L. . 

Morris, Miss M. E. . 

Morton, Miss E. H. 

Huir, Miss O. M. 

Miiir, John R. . 
Tifaller, Geo. . 

Mungeam. H. J. 

Murray, Miss C. K. . 

Murray, E. and Mrs. 

Murray, Miss M. 
\l£yrbeTg, A. A. 



Shan-tong 
Cheb-kiang 
Cheh-kian^ 
Nf;iin-hwei 
Cheh-kiang 
Cheh-kiang 
Cheh-kiang 

Ean-suh 

Ngan-hwei 

Cheli-kiaQg 

Shen-si 

Cheh-kiang 

Si-cbnan 

Ngan-hwci 

Cheh-kiang 

Shaii'Si 

3hen-si 
Shan-si 

Si-chuan 

Cheh-kiang 

Ngan-hwei 

England 

Shan.tJjng 

Shan-ai 



Naylor, Miss E. E. . Eiang-sQ 

Neale, F. H. and Mrs. America 

Nicholls, A. 0. . Yun-nan 

XNiUon, J. O. andMr). Shen-si 

tMlaon, Ph. and Mr$. Shen-si 

NilsBon, Misa M. Si-chnan 

XNordtn, Miti L. . Shen-si 

ZNorAhmd, V. L. and 

Mrs. . . . Shen-ai 



•Nylin, MUt L. if. . 


Shan-si 


Nystrom, C. F. and 




Mrs. . . . 


Shan-si 


Oakeshott, Miss R. . 


Ngan-hwei 


tObtrg.O.KandMri. 


Shan-si 


Ogden, Misa E. A. . 
Olesen, P. 0. . . 


Eiang-sn 


Ngan-hwei 


tOiten, CA.. . 


Shan-si 


Olsen, F. and Mrs. . 


Si-chuan 


iOlim, MUs 0. . 


Ean-suh 


tOhcm, Mill A. 


Shen-si 


Orr, J. 8. and Mrs. . 


Klaug-su 


Orr-Ewing, A. and 




Mrs. . . . 


Eiang-si 


Owen, J. W. . . 


Hu-nin 



Page, Miss F. J. 

Page,!. . . . 
tPalmberg, £dwin, . 
tFalmberg, Oust. 

Palmer, Miss E. 

Palmer, Johnand Mrs. 

Parker, 0. and Mrs. 

Parry, Dr. H. L. and 
Mra. . . . 

Parsona, C. H. 

Parsons, Cassen E. . 
tPaulion, E. M, 

Fearce, Miss £. C. . 

Pearse, E. 

Pearse, Mrs. E. 

Pearson, Mias M. 

Pemberton, Mias B. J. 

Permiin, Hiaa B. C. 

Peteraen, Miss M, C. 
XPtteritm, Mia E. 
XPetterion, ifin B. E. 
'PaUruon, Hits B. 

M.P.. 
^Pfanntfa&lkr.ff. and 
Xri. . 

Phillips, Miss S. A. 

Pike, Miss C. A. . 

Pike, D. F. . 

Piatt, J. C. and Mrs. 

Polhill, A. T. aud 

Mra. . . . 

%Pollock, MUi Mary . 

Porteous, Gladstone 

Porteona, E. W. 

Potter, Miss E. A. . 

Powell, Misa E. A. . 

Powell, Eohert 

Preedy, Arthur 

Pruen, Dr. W. L. and 
Mrs. . 



Si-chuan 

Ngan-hwei 

Shen-si 



Ho-nan 

Si-chnan 
Si-chuan 

Ean-suh 
Shen-si 

England 

Si-chuan 
England 
Hu-nan 



Hu-nan 

Ynn-nan 
Eiang-si 

Ngan-hwei 
Shan-tong 
Anstrolia 
Kan-suh 

Ewei-chow 
Shan -si 
Kwei-chow 



in* 



CHINA AxND THE GOSPEL 



RaUton, Miss K. 
Kamsay/^Miss I. W. 
*Jiam8t€nf Miss M, J, 
Readshaw, Miss C. . 
Rees, Miss G. . 
Rehnberg, Miss Agneta 
Reid, Miss H. L. 
Reid, J. T. and Mrs. 
Reid, Miss Lilias 
Reid, Miss M. A. 
Ren, Pastor 
XReniiJbSf V, and Mrs, 
Rhodes, F. H. and Mrs. 
Richardson, Miss L. 
Richardson, W. and 

Mrs. 
Ridley, H. F. and Mrs. 
Ririe, B. and Mrs. . 
Robertson, W. W. and 

Mrs. . 
Robinson, T. A. S. 

and lAxs. 
Robnon, Miss I. A. . 
Rogers, Geo. A. and 

Mrs. . 
^RQhmf R. and Mrs, . 
Ross, Miss I. . 
Row, G. F. and Mrs. 
Rowe, Miss E. M. . 
Rowe, J. L. 
Rudland, Miss G. . 
Rudland, W. D. 
Rudland, Miss A. R. 
XRydf J, 0, 
XRydherg^ A, E, and 

Mrs, ,' , 

Saltmarsh, Miss A. I. 
*Sandhergy J, T, and 

Mrs, . 
Sanders, A. H. 
Sanderson, Miss A. . 
Sargeant, Miss J. 
Saunders, A. R. and 

Mrs. . 
Sauz^, Miss F. 
Schild, E. 0. . 
^Schmidty 0. and Mrs, 
Schofield, Mrs. 
Schoppe, F. K. and 

Mrs. . 
Scorer, Miss H. M. . 
Searle, E. C. and Mrs. 
^Seipelf Adam , 
Selkirk, T. and Mrs. 
fSetterberf/f Miss A, . 
Seville, G. H. and Mrs. 
Seymour, Miss L. 



Cheh-kiang 

Si-chuan 

Ho-nan 

Ngan-hwei 

Kiang-su 

Kiang-si 

Ngan-hwei 

Kiang-si 

N^^an-hwei 

Kiang-su 

Cheh-kiang 

Shen-si 

Yun-nan 

Si-chuan 

Cheh-kiang 

Kan-suh 

Si-chuan 

Cheh-kiang 

Shen-si 
Eiang-su 

Si-chuan 

Cheh-kiang 

Kwei-chow 

Hu-peh 

Kean-hwei 

Kiang-si 

England 

Cheh-kiang 

Cheh-kiang 

Kan-suh 

Kiang-su 



Hu-peh 

Shan-si 
Australia 
Shan-tong 
Kiang-su 

Kiang-su 

Ngan-hwei 

Ngan-hwei 

Cheh-kiang 

England 

Hu-nan 

Si-chuan 

Cheh-kiang 

Kiang-si 

Yun-nan 

Shan-si 

Cheh-kiang 

Kiang-si 



Shackleton, Dr. W. 

and Mrs. 
Shapleigh, Mrs. A. L. 
Shearer, W. E. and 

Mrs. . 
Shepperd, Miss E. A. 
Shindler, F. E. and 

Mrs. . 
Sibley, H. A. and Mrs. 
Simpson, Miss A. M. 
XSkollenberg^ Miss A, 
Skow, Miss A. C. 
Slater, Miss A. 
Sloan, W. B. and Mrs. 
Smalley, Miss R. L. 
Smith, Miss Annie E. 
Smith, Miss E. M. . 
Smith, Miss Lucy . 
tSoderbom, C. O, and 

Mrs, . 
Soderstrom, Mrs. U. 
Soltau, Miss M. E. . 
Sorenson, T. and Mrs. 
Southey, J. and Mrs. 
Spiller, Miss E. H. A. 
Squire, H. J. and Mrs. 
*Stdlhammar, G. A. 

and Mrs, 
Standen, Miss M. E. 
Stanislaw, A. . 
Stark, James and Mrs. 
Stavner, Miss K. B. 
Stellmann, Miss F. . 
Steven, F. A. and Mrs. 
Stevens, C. H. and 

Mrs. 
Stevenson, J. W. 
Stevenson, Mrs. J. W. 
Stevenson, O. and Mrs. 
Stooke, J. A. and Mrs. 
Stott, Mrs. G. 
XStrandf Miss A. 
Strong, W. S. and Mrs. 
^Stticki, Miss R, 
Suter, Miss M. 
XSivanson, Miss A, , 

Talbot, Mrs. . 
Taylor, Miss E. G. . 
Taylor, Ernest H. . 
Taylor, Dr. F. H. and 

Mrs. 
Taylor, H. H. and 

Mrs. . 
Taylor, W.C. and Mrs. 
Taylor, Wm. and Mrs. 
Thomas, Miss H. L. 
Thomasson, H. W. . 



Kiang-su 
Kiang-su 

Ho-nan 
Shan-tong 

Shan-sl 

Hu-peh 

Yun-nan 

Kan-suh 

Kiang-si 

Shan-tong 

England 

Kiang-su 

Ho-nan 

England 

Kiang-su 

Chih-li 

Ho-nan 

Ho-nan 

Si-chuan 

Australia 

Si-chuan 

Si-chuan 

Ho-nan 

Kiang-si 

Ngan-hwei 

Kiang-su 

Cheh-kiang 

Shan-si 

America 

Shen-si 

Kiang-su 

England 

Yun-nan 

Shan-tong 

Cheh-kiang 

Kan-suh 

Si-chuan 

Cheh-kiang 

Kiang-si 

Shen-si 

Ho-nan 

Kiang-si 

Shan-si 

England 

Ngan-hwei 

Si-chuan 

Kiang-si 

Kiang-su 

Si-chuan 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF MISSIONARIES 126 



Thompson, H. G. . 
Thomson, C. and Mrs. 
Thor, A. E. and Mrs. 
Tippet, Miss C. F. . 
*Tjdder, C, H, and 

Todd, J. H. and Mrs. 
Tomalin, E. and Mrs. 
Tomkinson, Mrs. E . 
XT&rnvallf D, arid Mrs. 
Torrance, Thos. 
Toyne, E. G. . 
Tranter, Miss A. 
Traub, Fred, and Mrs. 
Trojahn,MissE.E.V. 
Triidinger, A. and 

Mrs. . 
Triidinger, Miss D. . 
Triidinger, Miss E. . 
Triidinger, Miss G. . 
Tucker, Miss E. M. 
Tull, Frank and Mrs. 
Turner, Miss E. 
Turner, Miss J. L. . 
Twizell, Miss E. S. . 
Tyler, W. E. . 

Urquhart, D. . 

Yale, Jos. and Mrs. . 
Veryard, R. K. 

Wallace, Miss E. 
XWalleThberg, Miss G, 

Ware, Miss A. C. 

Warren, Owen . 

Warren, W. H. and 
Mrs. . 
^Wartvn/innt Miss E, 

Waterman, MissM. E. 

Waters, B. Curtis and 
Mrs. . 

Waters, Miss M. E. . 
XWcUsaaSf Chr. 

Weber, Miss L. I. . 

Webster, Miss Bessie 



Si-chuan 
Cheh-kiang 
Kiang-si 
Shan-si 

Shan-si 

Australia 

Shan-tong 

Shan-tong 

Kan-suh 

Si-chuan 

Si-chuan 

Cheh-kiang 

Kiang-si 

Hu-nan 

Shan-si 

Shan-tong 

Eiang-su 

Kiang-su 

Si-chuan 

Hu-peh 

Si-chuan 

Shan-tong 

Cheh-kiang 

Eiang-si 

Shan-si 

Si-chuan 
Ngan-hwei 

Ho-nan 
Kan-suh 
Chih-H 
Ngau-hwei 

Cheh-kiang 

Kiang-si 

Kiang-su 

Kwei-chow 

Si-chuan 

Shen-si 

Kiang-su 

Ngan-hwei 



Webster, J as. W. and 

Mrs. . 
X JVedicson, Miss J, . 
* Wester, G. W. 
Westwood, W. and 

Mrs. . 
t Wetterstrandy Miss 

White, Miss E.' R. '. 
White, H. G. . 
Whittlesey, R. B. and 

Mrs. . 
Whittome, Miss A. . 
Wilcox, J. W. and 

Mrs. 
Wilkins, Miss J. M. 
Willett,T.G.andMrs. 
Williams, Mrs. E. 0. 
Williams, Miss F. M. 
Williams, Dr. J. E. 

and Mrs. 
Williams, Miss M. . 
Williams, R. . 
Williamson, Miss K. I. 
Wiltshire, S. G. 
Wilson, A. B. and 

Mrs. . 
Wilson, Miss L. M. . 
Wilson, Dr. W. and 

Mrs. . 
Windsor, T. and Mrs. 
Witt, Heinrich 
Witte, H. A. F. 
tWUzellf A. aTidMrs. 
Wohlleber, C. 
Wood, F. M. and Mrs. 
Wood, Miss M. A. . 
Wright, Mrs. A. 
Wright, Miss A. M. 
Wupperfeld, H. and 

Mrs. . 



Si-chuan 
Kan-suh 
Shan-si 

Ngan-hwei 

Shan-si 

Shan-tong 

Ngan-hwei 

Si-chuan 
Kiang-su 

Ngan-hwei 

Ho-nan 

Shan-tong 

Shan-tong 

Si-chuan 

Kiang-su 

Si-chuan 

Kwei-chow 

England 

Ngan-hwei 

Cheh-kiang 
Si-chuan 

Si-chuan 

Kwei-chow 

U!u-nan 

Hu-nan 

America 

Kiang-si 

England 

Kiang-si 

Shan-tong 

Shen-si 

Si-chuan 



Yard, Miss E. M. . Kiang-su 

Young, Miss F. . Australia 

Young, l^Iiss F. A. M. Cheh-kian^ 

Young, Robert . Ngan-hwei 



* The Swedish Mission in China 89 

t The Swedish Holiness Union 17 

t The Scandinavian China Alliance 68 

II The Norwegian Mission in China 8 

^ The German China Alliance 24 

z The Finnish Free Church 4 

§ Independent 1 

156 

Men. Single Women. Wives. Widows. Total. Stations. 
Members . . 271 221 184 17 698 158 

Associates . . 64 54 36 2 156 47 

849 205 



In |ftem0riam 



MARTYRS OP THE CHINA INLAND MISSION— 61 



" Cfjese are tfjeg loiitcl) came out oC great tribulation, anH ijabe hiasf^eti t^tix 
robes, anil maUe tfiem loijite in ti)e Mooli of tf)t Eamir. Cf^erefbre are tijep 
before tfje ti^rone of Gati, m\i seriie Jgim liag anli nig|^t in fgis temple/ 



» 



William S. Fleming . 


February 21, 


N. Caklbson . . . . 


December 6, 


JUSTINA EnGVALL 


November 2, 


MiNA Hbdlund . 


March 26, 


Anna Johansson 


„ 23, 


G. E. Earlberg . . . . 


„ 15, 


0. A. L. Larsson 


M 12, 


Jenny Lundall . . . . 


October 21, 


S. A. Persson . . . . 


March 15, 


E. Persson {nie Pettersson) 


n 26, 


Ernst Pbitersson 


February 22, 


Emily E. B. "Whitchurch . 


April 15, 


Edith E. Searell 


July 17, 


William Cooper . . . . 


January 9, 


Benjamin Bagnall . 


1 


Emily Bagnall {n^ Kingsbury) 


December 29, 


William Millar Wit<80N . 


September 27, 


Christine Wilson 


» 27, 


Jane Stevens 


• f 


Mildred E. Clarke . 


. November 24, 


Stewart McKee . . . . 


n 26, 


Kate McKee (n^ Mc Waiters) . 


April 26, 


Charles S. I'Anson . 


December 20, 


Florence I'Anson (n^ Doggett) 


November 30, 


Maria AsPDEN . 


February 5, 


Margaret E. Smith . 


November 16, 


Haitie J. Rice . . . . 


January 1, 


George McConnell . 


March 8, 



Date. 

Arrival in China. Deceask. 

1895 November 4, 1898. 

1890 June 28, 1900. 
1899 
1894 
1898 
1896 
1898 
1899 
1896 
1894 
1900 

1884 June 30, 1900. 
1895 

1881 July 1, 1900. 
1873 
1880 

1891 July 9, 1900. 
1891 
1885 
1893 

1884 July 12, 1900. 
1887 
1887 
1889 
1892 
1896 

1893 July 13, 1900. 
1890 July 16, 1900. 



126 



IN MEMORIAM 



127 



Isabella McConnell (n^e Gray) 


January 4, 


Annie King . . . . 


November 2, 


Elizabeth Bukton 


2, 


John Young . . . . 


„ 18, 


Alice Young {n^e Troyer) . 


January 80, 


David Baikd Thompson 


»» 9| 


Agnes Thompson {n^ Dowman) . 


October 11, 


Josephine Desmond . 


January 4, 


Emma Ann Thirgood . 


January 13, 


G. Frederick Ward . 


February 18, 


Etta L. Ward (rUe Fuller) . 


January 14, 


Edith S. Sherwood . 


February 18, 


Mariette Manchester 


September 14, 


David Barratt . 


April 7, 


Alfred Woodroffe . 


October 23, 


Margaret Cooper {n^ Palmer) . 


December 5, 


MaryE. Huston 


January 30, 


Francis Edith Nathan 


November 8, 


May Rose Nathan 


March 11, 


Elizabeth Mary Heaysman 


. November 21, 


Anton P. Lundgren . 


March 4, 


Els A Lundgren (n^ Nilson) 


February 17, 


Annie Eldred . . . . 


November 2, 


William Graham Peat 


January 16, 


Helen Peat {n^ McKenzie) 


December 30, 


Edith J. Dobson 


January 5, 


Emma G. Hurn . . . . 


February 14, 


Duncan Kay . . . . 


November 26, 


Caroline Kay {nde Matthewson) 


„ 10, 


P. A. Ogren 


> 


Flora Constance Glover . 


April 11, 


James R. Bruce . . . . 


October 20, 


Richard H. Lowis 


n 17, 



Date. 
Abrival in China. Decease. 

1893 July 16, 1900. 

1898 

1898 

1896 

1896 

1881 July 21, 1900. 

1883 

1899 

1890 July 22, 1900. 

1893 

1895 

1893 July 24, 1900. 
1895 

1897 September 21, 1900. 
1897 August 18, 1900. 

1887 August 6, 1900. 

1896 „ 11, 1900. 

1894 August 13, 1900. 
1899 
1897 

1892 August 15, 1900. 
1891 
1898 

1888 August 30, 1900. 
1888 
1895 
1898 

1884 September 15, 1900. 
1884 

1893 October 15, 1900. 

1897 October 25, 1900. 
1896 August 15, 1902. 
1899 



,, 



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1 



INCOME RECEIVED IN ENGLAND PROM 1864-1905 

£ 8. d. 

51 14 

1,130 9 2 

4,094 12 3 

2,971 19 9 

3,358 3 9 

4,102 19 4 

3,912 11 1 

3,711 2 6 

3,205 1 2 

3,373 18 10 

4,426 3 7 

7,311 15 7 

8,119 14 2 

7,726 17 11 

8,644 9 

9,983 11 11 

8,692 11 2 

10,054 5 11 

9,436 9 

13,233 13 3 

onths) . . 26,179 8 2 

19,401 4 4 

21,366 16 3 

29,961 10 3 

32,924 10 10 

48,662 19 3 

29,932 17 2 

26,188 4 

24,496 3 8 

32,178 14 6 

29,751 17 9 

33,775 5 

34,430 15 3 

37,521 4 4 

53,460 13 6 

43,280 16 4 

42,149 15 3 

46,892 16 7 

51,446 10 7 

38,206 11 1 

42,026 7 5 

45,034 5 1 



January 1864 


• ■ « 


January to December 1865 . 


January to 25th May 1866 . 


26th May 1866 to 25th May 1867 


1867 


1868 


1868 


1869 


1869 


1870 


1870 


1871 


1871 


1872 


1872 


1873 


1873 


1874 


1874 


1875 


1875 


1876 


1876 


1877 


1877 


1878 


1878 


1879 


1879 


1880 


1880 


1881 


1881 


1882 


1882 


1883 


,, 1883 to Dace 


mber 1884 ( 


January to December 1 


885 


1 


886 






887 






888 






889 






890 






891 






892 






893 






894 
895 
896 
897 
898 
899 
900 
901 
902 
903 




» ii *■ 


904 




> i> ■*■ 


905 



£906,311 1 8 



INCOME RECEIVED IN NORTH AMERICA PROM 1888-1905 



Year. 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 



Dollars. 


Year. 






3,389-55 


1897 . . . . 


6,841-57 


1898 




• • 


16,398-72 


1899 




• • 


17,014-85 


1900 




• • 


21,297-78 


1901 




• • 


20,823-66 


1902* 




• • 


27,514-25 


1903 






83,320-41 


1904 




» • 


31,878-38 


1905 




• • 



Total for N. America from 1888-1905, $1584,297-94. 



Dollars. 
35,912-52 
35,097-45 
45,814-81 
40,693-70 
49,798-51 
61,437-14 
38,699-45 
46,579 02 
51,786-22 



* Also the Norristown Home, valued at 12,500 dollars. 
N.B;-^Th&ie amounts do not include monies simply transmitted for Associates 

139 



140 



Dr. 



CHINA INLAND 

Greneral Sunvmary 



To Balakgbs from 1904 : — 
General Ftmd Account 

Special Accounts : — 
China Account, Mission- 
aries on Forlough . £13 3 
Superannuation Account 26 1 4 

Compassionate Account . 6 14 7 



To Receipts acknowledged 
IN China*8 Millions as per 
Total in February Number, 
1906 :— 

General Fund AccouM 

Special Accounts : — 

China Account : — 
For Specified Purposes 

in China . £2,974 10 
Missionaries at Home 
on Furlough . 255 5 



»» 



Candidates Account 

Outfits and Passages Account 

Property Account : — 

Rents .... 

Home Department 
Account : — 

Office Account 
Towards Expenses of 
Meetings . 



Superannuation Account :— 

Donations 

Interest on Investments 

Morton Legacy Account 

Compassionate Account : — 
Interest on Investments 



£ s, 

7 



d. 
1 



45 18 11 



27,612 19 4 



4 
3 



3,229 15 7 
105 17 10 

694 9 
137 13 1 



£10 15 
11 14 9 



£400 
206 2 6 



22 9 9 



606 2 6 
12,500 



32 1 3 



Sale op Compassionate Account Investment 



44,941 
93 



s. d. 



46 6 




5 



1 




£45,080 11 1 



MISSION— BRITAIN 








141 


of Gash Accourdfor 1905. 








Cr. 


By Expenditdbe: — 


£ 


8, 


d. 


£ s. d. 


I. China Account 


24,340 


19 


3 




II. Candidates Account 


531 


5 


9 


• 


III. Outfits and Passages Account . 


3,098 


2 


2 




IV. Property Account . 


111 


5 


8 




V. Home Department Account 


3,688 


17 


5 




VI. Superannuation Account 


660 


11 


3 




VII. Morton Legacy Account . 


12,500 










VIII. Compassionate Account . 


105 


1 


7 


Lft Oftfi 3 1 



[F(yi* Particulars of these Amounts 

see the separate Accounts follomng.] 



By Balances Cabbisd Forward: — 
Qbneral Fund Account 
Special Accounts: — 
China Account, Mission- 
aries on Furlough . £16 8 
Compassionate Account 26 1 9 



£10 4 



5 
3 



43 7 8 



44 8 



£45,080 11 1 



142 



PARTICULARS OF EXPENDITURE 



I. China Account. 

Cash Remitted to China from London — 

For Oeneral Purposes ..... 
,, Special Purposes (Exclusive of Morton Legacy Account) 
Telegraphic Expenses .... 

Payments to Missionaries on Furlough 
Medical Attendance, Nursing, and Funeral Expenses 
Support and Education of Missionaries* Children at Home 
Allowances to Aged Parent of Missionary 
Allowances out of Testamentary Bequests 



8, d. 



16,765 








3,024 


10 


4 


8 


7 10 


4,201 


7 


4 


40 17 


6 


233 


16 


3 


25 








42 









£24,340 19 3 



II. Candidates Account. 

Training of Candidates including one Student at livingstone 
College. ....... 

Allowances for Travelling, Hospital Expenses, and Vaccinations 
Stationery ........ 

Men's Probation Home — 

Rates, Taxes, Furnishing, and Insurance 

Water, Coal, Gas, and Housekeeping .... 

Ladies' Probation Home — 

Rent, Rates, Taxes, and Water ..... 

Paid to Miss Soltau, being special gift towards Training of 
Candidate ....... 

Removal of Furniture, and Repairs .... 



£ s. 


d. 


82 16 
10 10 
23 il 



3 
3 


46 16 
130 7 



2 


227 16 


6 



5 

4 8 7 



£531 5 9 



III. Outfits and Passages Account. 



Outfits and Passages to China, etc. . 
Shipment of Baggage, Travelling, and Sundries 



£ 8, d. 

3055 8 7 

42 13 7 

£3098 2 2 



IV. Property Account. 

Repairs to Newington Green and Pyrland Road Properties, Atten- 
tion to Gardens, and Surveyor's Charges 
Ground Rent and Insurance ...... 



£ 8. d. 

94 1 9 
17 3 11 

£111 5 8 



We have examined the above Accounts with the Books and Vouchers and the 

We have also verified the Consols and Bonds held by the Mission, representing 

The other Property of the Mission in England and Scotland is vested in the 

and consists of the Mission's Freehold Premises at Newington Green, some Property 

Mildmay. The Mission has also a Superannuation Fund of £5000 — invested in 



1 FiNSBURY Circus, London, E.C, Uh May 1906, 



ON THE VARIOUS ACCOUNTS— BRITAIN 



143 



V. Home Defabtment Account. 

Missionary Home — 

Rates, Taxes, Insurance, and Repairs . 

Water, Coke, Housekeeping, and Sundry Expenses 

Office Expenses — 

Rates, Taxes, Insurance, Furnishing, and Repairs 

Gas, Water, Ck>ke, and Cleaning 

Salaries of Home Officials and Office Helpers 

Office Stationery and Sundries . 

Postages, Telegrams, Telephone, and Carriage 

Cheque Books and Bank Commissions . 

Expenses of Meetings arranged in London — 

Travelling, Printing, Stationery, Advertising, Hire of Halls, 

Rates, Taxes, Gas, Water, Coke, etc. .... 

Other Expenses — 

Expenses of Glasgow Office and Meetings arranged in Scotland 
Missionaries employed on Home Stafif .... 
Printing and Circulating China's Millions (supplied Free to 

Donors), and Books and Reports given away 
Missionary Boxes, Telegraphic Codes, and Incidental Expenses 



£ s. 


d. 


113 11 

177 7 


9 
1 


74 18 
53 11 
1460 18 
83 19 
94 9 
10 16 


6 
5 
8 

11 
5 

11 


290 10 
29 3 


3 

5 


89 16 
555 1 


9 




624 4 1 
30 9 3 

£3688 17 5 



VI. SUPEEANKUATION ACCOUNT. 

Allowances to Retired Workers . . 



£ s, d, 
660 11 3 



VII. Morton Legacy Account. 



Remitted to China 



£ «. d, 
12,500 



VIII. Compassionate Account. 

[Special Gift for Belief of Sufferers through Boxer Biots of 1900.] 
Payments for Widows and Orphans of Martyred Missionaries 



£ «. d. 
105 1 7 



Bank Pass Books, and find them correct. 

the Compassionate Account. 

China Inland Mission Corporation (a Body that acts as Trustee for the Mission), 

at Lochee held in Fee Simple, and two Leasehold Houses in Pyrland Road, 

Mortgages on House Property. 



(Signed) ARTHUR J. HILL, VELLACOTT k CO., 

Chartered Accountants, 



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147 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF ALL THE MISSIONARY 

SOCIETIES IN CHINA, 1905 



Namc op Socistt 

Allgemeiner Evangelical Protestant Missionsverein 

American Advent Christian Mission 

American Baptist Missionary Union 

American BiUe Society . 

American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions 

American Norwegian Lutheran Mission 

American Presbyterian Mission . 

American Presb3rterian Mission (South) 

American Presbyterian Reformed Mission 

American Protestant Episcopal Church Mission 

American Society of Friends Mission 

American Southern Baptist Mission 

Basel Missionary Society 

Berlin Foundling House 

Berlin Missionary Society 

Bible Christian Mission . 

Blind^ Mission for Chinese^ Peking 

British and Foreign Bible Society 

Canadian Methodist Mission 

Canadian Presbyterian Mission . 
tCentral China Religious Tract Society 

China Inland Mission 
tChina Missionary Alliance 
tChinese Tract Society . 

Christian and Missionary Alliance 

Christian College in China^ Macao 
tChristian Vernacular Society of Shanghai 

Christians' Mission 

Church Missionary Society 

Church of England iZenana Mission 

Church of Scotland Mission 

Cumberland Presbyterian Mission 

Danish Lutheran Mission 
tEducational Association of China 

English Baptist Mission . 

English Methodist Mission 

English Presb3rterian Mission . 

English United Methodist Free Church 

Finland Missionary Society 
'^Finnish Free Church Mission 

148 



Datb 

1885 

1897 

1843 

1876 

1830 

1899 

1844 

1867 

1897 

1835 

1890 

1845 

1852 

1850 

1882 

1885 

1881 

1843 

1891 

1888 

1876 

1865 

1901 

1878 

1890 

1890 
1885 
1844 
1884 
1878 
1898 
1896 
1877 
1845 

1847 
1864 
1901 
1890 



MISSIONARY SOCIETIES IN CHINA 



U9 



Name of Society Date 

Foreign Christian Missionary Society . . 1886 

Friends' Foreign Mission ..... 1886 

'^Kjrennan China Alliance Mission .... 1889 

Gospel Mission ....... 1892 

Hauge's Synodes Mission ..... 1892 

Hildesheim Mission for the Blind^ Hong-Kong . 1890 
Independent ....... 

Irish Presbyterian Church Mission .... 1869 

London Missionary Society ..... 1807 

Lutheran Brethren Mission ..... 

tMedical Missionary Society . . . 1886 

Methodist Episcopal Churchy Souths U.S.A. . . 1848 

Methodist Episcopal Mission ..... 1847 
Methodist Union Publishing House .... 

National Bible Society of Scotland .... 1863 

tNorth China Tract Society ..... 1882 
North- West Kiang-si Mission ..... 

Norwegian Lutheran Mission ..... 1891 

♦Norwegian Mission in China ..... 1894 

Norwegian Missionary Society .... 1901 
Presbyterian Church of New Zealand .... 
Protestant Methodist Church Mission^ Hu-nan . 

Reformed Church in America ..... 1842 

Reformed Church in the United States .... 1897 

Rhenish Missionary Society ..... 1847 

Scandinavian American Christian Free Mission . . 1888 

^Scandinavian China Alliance Mission .... 1891 

Seamen's Church and Mission Society .... 

Seamen's Mission ...... 1885 

Seventh Day Adventist Mission ..... 1888 

Seventh Day Baptist Mission ..... 1847 

Society for the Propagation of the Gospel . . 1874 

tSociety for the Diffusion of Christian and General Knowledge 

among the Chinese ...... 1886 

South Chih-li Mission . . . . . 

Swedish American Missionary Covenant 1890 
Swedish Baptist Mission^ Kiao-chau .... 

♦Swedish Holiness Union ..... 1890 

♦Swedish Mission in China ..... 1887 

Swedish Missionary Society ..... 1890 

The John G. Kerr Refuge for Insane, Canton . 

United Brethren in Christ ..... 1889 

United Society for Christian Endeavour for China 

United Evangelical Church Mission .... 1900 

United Free Church of Scotland .... 1863 

Wesleyan Missionary Society ..... 1851 

Woman's Union Mission ..... 1859 

Yale University Mission ...... 1904 

Young Men's Christian Associations .... 

* Societies associate with the China Inland Mission. 

t Associations formed in China for special work, composed of missionaries connected 
with regular missionary societies. 



CHINA INLAND MISSION. 



HOME CENTRES. 



ENGLAND . 
SCOTLAND . 
SWITZERLAND 



EUROPE 

. Newington Green^ Mildmay^ London, N. 
. 121 Bath Street, Glasgow. 
St. Chrischona, near BaseL 

NORTH AMERICA. 



UNITED STATES . 235 School Lane, Germantown; Pliiladelpllia^ 



CANADA . 



• • 



Pa. 

507 Church Street, Toronto. 



AUSTRALIA . . 
NEW ZEALAND 
TASMANIA . . 



AUSTRALASIA. 

. 267 Collins Street, MelbOQine. 

. " MoANA," Michie Street, Roslyn, Dnnedin. 

. 103 Macquarie Street, Hobart. 



ASSOCIATE MISSIONS. 



SWEDEN . 



NORWAY . 
GERMANY 



FINLAND . 



EUROPE. 

. . The Swedish Mission in China, Stockholm. 
The Swedish Holiness Union, Torp, Knmla. 
The Scandinavian China Alliance, Jttnkdping. 

. . The Norwegian Mission in China, Ohristiania. 

. . The German China Alliance, Seifenstrasse 5, 
Bannen. 
The liebenzell Mission, Liebenzell, Wurttem- 
berg. 

. . The Free Church Mission, Senttlla, Dickorsby. 



NORTH AMERICA 

UNITED STATES . The Scandinavian China Alliance, 1084 N. 

Francisco Avenue, OhicagO, 111. 
150 



CHINA INLAND MISSION. 

Founder — The late Rev. J. Hudson Taylor, M.R.C.S. 
General Director — D. E. Hoste. 



LONDON COUNCIL. 

Hwne Director and Chairman — Theodore Howard, Bickley, Kent. 

Assistant Home Director — Walter B. Sloan. 

Richard H. Hill, Oak Hatch, Cecil H. Polhill, Howbury Hall, 



Edward Boad, Bromley, Kent 
WiujAM Sharp, Woodfield, Beulah 

Hill, Norwood, S.E. 
P. S. Badenoch, Conference Hall, 

Mildmay. 
Rev. J. J. Luce, M. A., St Nicholas 



Bedford. 

Colonel J. W. Hoooe, C.B., Tent- 
field, Newbury, Berks. 

Rev. J. Stuart Holden, M.A., 
66 Gloucester Place, W. 

Colonel J. Winn, Fairhaven, Bel- 



Vicarage, Gloucester. { vedere Grove, Wimbledon. 

Treasurer — Robert Scott. Secretary — F. Marcus Wood. 

Editorial Secretary — Marshall Broomhall, B.A. 



Secretary Women's Department — 

Miss H. £. Soltau, 92 Grosvenor Road, London, N. 

Cashier — Walter Tucker. 

Offices — China Inland Mission, Newington Green, London, N. 

Telegraphic Address — Lammermuir, London. 

Telephone— 1^*7 Dalston. 

Bankers — London and County, 21 Lombard Street, London, E.C. 

All donations to be addressed to the Secretary. Cheques and 
Money Orders (payable at G.P.O.) to be made payable to the China 
Inland Mission, and crossed " London and County Bank." 

It is particularly requested that on every occasion when a sum of 
money is sent for transmission to a Missionary as a gifty or for any 
private purpose, it be clearly indicated as for transmission only. But 
money intended for the support or work of any particular Missionary, or 
for a Native Helper, or Bible-woman, or Scholar, or any other Mission 
object, being practically a contribution to the Mission, should not be 
marked ybr transmission^ but the desired object indicated only. 



CHINA'S MILLIONS. 

The Organ of the China Inland Mission is published monthly. It 
may be had direct from the Offices of the Mission at any of English- 
speaking Home Centres or through the Publishers. 

The English Edition is published by Messrs. Morgan and Scott. 
Price Id. per month ; Is. 6d. post free per annum. 

The American Edition from Mission Offices. 50 cents per annum. 

The Australasian Edition from M. and M. L. Hutchinson, Little 
Collins Street, Melbourne. Id. per month ; Is. 6d. post free per annum. 

151 



COUNCIL FOR NORTH AMERICA. 

Henry W. Frost, Chairman, and Acting Secretary and Treasurer, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
J. S. Helher, Secretary and Treasurer, Toronto, Ont. 



J. O. Anderson, Toronto, Ont. 

Hon. S. H. Blake, K.C, Toronto, 
Ont. 

J. R. Cavers, Gait, Ont. 

Horace C. Coleman, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Rev. T. C. DesBarres, M.A., 
Toronto, Ont. 

Rev. W. J. Erdman, D.D., Ger- 
mantown, Pa. 

Rev. Chas. R. Erdman, D.D., 
Gennantown, Pa. 

Rev. Fred. W. Farr, D.D., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

J. J. Gartshore, Toronto, Ont. 

Rev. Elmore Harris, D.D., 
Toronto, Ont. 

Howard A. Kelly, M.D., Balti- 
more, Md. 



Robert Kilgour, Toronto, Ont. 
Rev. D. McTavish, D.Sc., Toronto, 

Ont. 
J. D. Nasmith, Toronto, Ont. 
Henry O'Brien, K.C, Toronto, 

Ont. 
Rev. H. M. Parsons, D.D., 

Toronto, Ont 
Elias Rogers, Toronto, Ont. 
Rev. D. M. Stearns, Germantown, 

Pa. 
Rev. F. A. Steven, London, 

Ont. 
Rev. R. A. ToRREY, Chicago, 

111. 
Rev. Thomas Wardrope, Guelph, 

Ont. 
Rev. Robert Wallace, Belleville, 

Ont. 



T. H. Stark, M.D. — Hon, Medical Examiner, 

IN THE UNITED STATES. 
235 School Lane, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 

IN CANADA. 

Offices and Home — 507 Church Street, Toronto, Ontario. 

AUSTRALASIAN COUNCIL. 



Rev. S. C. Kent. 
Rev. J. Southey. 
Mr. Theo. Kitchen. 
Rev. C. H. Barnes. 



Rev. J. Carson. 

Rev. D. O'DONNELL. 

Dr. McCoLL. 

Dr. W. Warren. 



Mr. G. P. Barber. 
Rev. W. H. HosKEN. 
Mr. Robert Gillespie. 
Mr. C. Oliver. 



Dr. J. J. Kitchen, Treasurer, 313 Park St., South Melhoume. 

Hon, Medical Examiner — ^Dr. W. H. Burton. 

Office — Australian Deposit and Mortgage Bank Buildings, 

267 Collins Street, MenK)urne. 

Local Representatives. 

Sydney — Rev. Henry Martin, Hon. Secretaryy Stanmore, Sydney. 

Warmambool — Mr. G. S. Mackay. 
Ballarat — Mr. F. Frioke. Bendigo—Rev. A. S. Devenish. 

. , ... ,^/Mr. T. E. Powell, 29 Grenfell St., Hon, Secretary, 
AtteiMtte^^j. Q g Goode, Grenfell St., Treamrer, 

Auckland, /Mrs. A. Chadwiok Brown, Hon, Sec, 
N.Z. \Mr. A. Chadwick Brown, Treas. 

TMr. J. H. Todd, Michie St., Roslyn, Secretary, 
Dnnedin-! Mr. J. Wilkinson, Solicitor, Zealandia Chambers, Dowling St., 

[ Treasurer, 
Brisbane — Mr. W. E. Smith, Hon, Secretary, Religious Tract and Sunday 

School Depot. 

LannceBton — Rev. £. Isaac. Bumie — Rev. J. T. Piercey. 

Hobart~Mr. John Maofarlane, Macquarie Street. 

162 



CHINA COUNCIL. 



General Direetor — 
D. £. HosTE. 

G. Andrew. 

F. W. Baller. 
J. F. Broumton. 
Bishop W. W. Cassels. 

J. J. COULTHARD. 

G. F. Easton. 



Deputy Director — 
J. W. Stevenson. 



C. T. FiSHE. 
£. FOLKE. 

J. N. Hayward. 

A. LUTLEY. 

J. J. Meadows. 
J. McCarthy. 



A. Orr-Ewing. 
Dr. H. L. Parry. 

E. Pearse. 

A. R. Saunders. 

F. H. Taylor, M.D. 
J. Vale. 



Secretary of Council — J. Stark. 



Postal Information. 

In writing to Missionaries in China it is advisable to write 
the name of the Mission in full, thus — China Inland Mission — 
not ^^C.I.M." The postal directions for each station will be 
found on pp. 103-118. 

Letters from the British Empire, with the exception of 
Australia and Tasmania, can be sent for one penny per half- 
ounce to Shanghai, Ningpo, Chefoo, and Hankow. To all other 
places the letters need 2^d. per half- ounce. Letters should 
always be directed to the Missionary at his station. If sent to 
Shanghai for Id. when the station is in the interior, this involves 
extra work and expense to the workers on the field. 

The Postal Union rates apply to letters from any other 
country than the above-mentioned ones. 

To all places in the interior to which there is no steamer or 
railway communication, a charge is now made on delivery, by the 
Chinese Imperial Post Office, on parcels, papers, and printed 
matter, etc., in addition to the Postal Union rates. This can- 
not be prepaid in the home country. This regulation does not 
affect letters and postcards prepaid at Postal Union rates. 



Telegraphic Address. 

The registered Telegraphic Address of the China Inland 
Mission at Shanghai, and all stations in China at which there are 
Telegraph Offices, also at Philadelphia, Toronto, and Melbourne, 
is— INLAND. 

At London and Glasgow alone, the Telegraphic Address is — 

LAMMERMUIR. 
153 



FOR ENGLAND OR AUSTRALASIA 

FORM OF BEQUEST 

/ bequeath to the China Inland Mission (Office, *New- 

INGTON Green, London, N.), the sum of 

^free of Legacy duty ; and I direct that 

this sum be paid to the Treasurer for the time being of the 
said Mission^ whose receipt sJiall be a sufficient discharge 
for t/ie same. 

* To be altered according to the country — England, or Australasia. 



FOR NORTH AMERICA 

FORM OF BEQUEST 

/ give and bequeath unto the China Inland Mission of 
North America (with Offices at PHILADELPHIA, PENN- 
SYLVANIA, and at TORONTO, ONTARIO) the sum of 

dollars^ to be expended 

for the appropriate objects of said Mission ; and I direct 
that the release of the Treasurer of the said Mission shall 
be a sufficient discharge to my executors in the premises. 



FORM OF DEVISE 

(real ESTATE) 

/ give and devise unto the China Inland Mission of 
North America (with Offices at PHILADELPHIA, PENN- 
SYLVANIA, and at TORONTO, Ontario), all that certain 
[here insert description of property], with the appurtenances^ 
in fee simple y for tlie use^ benefit y and behoof of said Mission 
for ever ; and I direct that the release of the Treasurer of 
the said Mission shall be a sufficient discharge to my 
executors in the premises. 



APPENDIX 



GROWTH OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH IN CHINA 



In 1842 




6 Communicants. 


In 1860 


1000 „ 




In 1877 


13,035 „ 




In 1890 


37,287 „ 




In 1898 


. 80,682 „ 




In 1900 


. 112,808 „ 




In 1903 


. 144,000 „ 




TART.K OF COMPARISON 




Of aU Societies. 


1900. 


1904. 


Increase 
Per cent. 


Protestant Missionaries in China 


2,785 


3,107 


13 


Chinese Helpers . . . 


6,388 


8,313 


30 


Communicants .... 


112,808 


131,404 


17 


Mission Stations 


653 


765 


17 


Mission Gut-stations . 


, 2,476 


3,666 


48 


Hospital Patients 


\ 691,732 


880,304 


27 


Day Schools .... 


1,819 


2,100 


15 


Scholars in these Schools . 


35,412 


43,275 


22 


Higher Educational Institutions 


170 


275 


62 


Students in these Institutions . 


5,150 


7,283 


41 



COMPARATIVE STATISTICS OF THE CHINA INLAND 

MISSION 







1 






Increase 


CI.M. 


1875. 


1886. 


1895. 


1905. 


of last 
10 years. 


Missionaries . 


52 


225 


641 


849 


208 


Native Helpers 


75 


117 


462 


1282 


820 


Stations and Out- 


52 


106 


260 


a37 


577 


stations 












Communicants 




1655 


5211 


14,078 


8867 


Chapels . 




85 


259 


827 


568 


Organised Churches 


28 

Churches 

formed. 


55 


154 


475 


321 


Baptized from Com- 




2026 


8018 


21,648 


13,630 


mencement 













155 



156 CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 



RAILWAY ENTERPRISE IN CHINA 

1. Railway Lines now Working. 

Peking to Han-kow. 

Peking to Tung-chow. 

Peking to Newehwang via Tien-tsin. 

Tsingtau to Chinan Fu (Shang-tung). 

Shanghai to Woosung. 

P'inghsiang to Liling (Kiang-si and Hu-nan) 

Canton to Samshui. 

Taok*ou to Chinghua (Ho-nan). 

Port Arthur to Harbin. 

Hsin-min-t un Line. 

2. Railway Lines in Construction. 

Canton to Han-kow. 

Peking to Kalgan. 

Chengting Fu to T'aiyiian Fu (Shan-si). 

Shanghai to Nanking. 

Swatow to Ch*ao-chow Fu. 

P'ing-yang Fu to Tsechow Fu (Shan-si). 

K*aifeng Fu to Loyang (Ho-nan). 

Yun-nan to Tongkin. 

3. Railway Lines Projected. 

Han-kow to Chentu Fu (Hu-peh and Si-chuan). 

Tsintsin to Chin-kiang. 

Hang-chow to Ning-po and Hang-chow to Soochow. 

Canton to Kowloon (Hong-kong). 

Wuhu to Kuangte-chow (Ngan-hwei). 

Canton to Amoy (Kwangtung). 

Canton to Kan-chow Fu (Kiang-si). 

Oh'en-chow to Ch*angte Fu (N. Ho-nan). 

Tungkuan to P'uchow Fu (Shan-si). 

Kiu-kiang to Nan-chang Fu (Kiang-si). 

Hsinning to Yungchiang (Kwangtung). 

Hsin-min-t'un to Moukden (Manchuria). 

Kalgan to Kulun (Manchuria). 

Lan-chow Fu to Ili (Kan-suh). 



APPENDIX 



167 



CHINESE IMPERIAL POST OFFICE 

During the year 1905 no fewer than 307 new post offices 
have been opened throughout China, making a total of 1626 
post offices m all. The land lines covered by couriers now 
measure about 40,000 miles (English), the routes covered by 
native boats 5000 miles, and by railways 2780 miles. The 
number of parcels handled has advanced from 771,000 to 
over one million, and the money order transactions from 
half a million taels to Hk. Tls.820,000. 

The following table shows the rapid development of the 
Chinese Imperial Postal system : — 





1901 


1902 


1903 


1904 


1905 


Head and Sub-offices 


30 


30 


34 


40 


41 


Branch Offices . 


134 


263 


320 


352 


396 


Agencies . 


12 


153 


609 


927 


1,189 


Articles dealt with . 


10,500,000 


20,000,000 


42,500,000 


66,000,000 


76,000,000 


Parcels: number 


126,800 


260,000 


487,000 


772,000 


1,032,000 


Parcels : weight (kilos. ) 
Letters in Native 


250,000 


545,000 


1,213,000 


2,702,000 


3,262,000 


7,300,000 


8,000,000 


7,267,000 


8,300,000 


8,896,000 


Clubbed Mails 













THE CHINESE IMPERIAL TELEGRAPH SERVICE 

The telegraph service of the Empire on 31st December 
1905 worked with 346 stations, 21,379 miles length of line 
open, and 34,641 miles length of wire. 

THE ANNUAL VALUE OF CHINA'S FOREIGN TRADE 



Yrar. 


Nbt Imports. 


Exports. 


Total. 




Hk. Taels. 


Hk. Taels. 


Hk. Taels. 


1901 


268,302,918 


169,656,757 


437,959,675 


1902 


315,363,905 


214,181,584 


529,545,489 


1903 


326,739,133 


214,352,467 


541,091,600 


1904 


344,060,608 


239,486,683 


583,547,291 


1905 


447,100,791 


227,888,197 


674,988,988 



158 



CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 



NET IMPORTATION OF OPIUM, 1904 and 1905 



Teab. 


Benares. 


Mat.wa. 


Patna. 


Persian. 


Total. 


1904 
1905 


Piculs. 
9,612 

11,294 


Piculs. 
22,098 

16,034 


Piculs. 

19,947 
22,901 


Piculs. 
3,095 

1,691 


Piculs. 
54,752 

61,920 



CHINA'S SHIPPING 

In 1900, 69,^30 vessels entered and cleared with a tonnage 
of 40,807,242. In 1905, 223,959 vessels entered and cleared 
with a tonnage of 72,756,547. The large inci'ease in vessels 
is from the increase in Chinese junks, wnich advanced from 
7709 in 1900 to 113,679 in 1905, the advance being mainly 
in 1904 and 1905. 



GENERAL INDEX 



Aborigines, 68, 69 
Ancestral hall, A converted, 98 
Anglo-Chinese Tibetan Treaty, 2 
Anglo- Japanese Alliance, Renewal of, 2 
Anti-footbinding Society, 51 
Appointment of Mr. Hoste as Director, 

18 
Army, China's modem, 2 

Backsliding : a singular coincidence, 86 

Baptisms, 15 

Bible circulation, 9, 85, 47, 49, 51, 52, 
74, 76, 84, 88, 94, 100 

Bible Schools, 27, 30, 31, 33, 35, 86, 38, 
89, 41, 42, 49, 50, 56, 60, 66, 68, 
71, 87, 91, 92, 93, 95, 97, 98 

Boycott of American imports, 7 

British and Foreign Bible Society, 
Contributions to, 36, 63, 81 

Broumton's resignation of Treasurer- 
ship, Mr., 19, 

Canton-Hankow Railway, 7 

Cash accounts, 140 

Changes at Wu-chang, 5 

Chefoo native work, 45 

Chefoo schools, 44 

Cheh-kiang Province, 90 

Chih-U Province, 42 

China-Japanese Treaty, 2 

Chinese National Christian Endeavour, 

triennial gathering, 11 
** Christian Endeavour " Societies, 48, 

49, 52, 65, 83, 97 
C.LM. Review, 13 
Conferences at — 

Chao-cheng, 38 

Chi-an, 75 

Chieh-hsiu, 36 

Chou-kia-kou, 48 

Han-chung, 28 

Hsien-chti, 94 

Hung-tung, 38 



Conferences at — 

Hun- yuan, 35 

Eai-feng, 51 

Kwei-yang, 67 

Ping-liang Fu, 25 

Tai-kang, 50 

Yoh-yang, 39 

Yung-kang, 97 
Converted Buddhist temple, 91 

Death of Dr. Bamardo, 19 
Death of J. Hudson Taylor, 13 
Death of Mr. Whitridge, 19 
Death of Sir Geo. Williams, 19 

Eastern Hills District, Shan-si, 40 
Eastern S'l-chuan District, 59 
Educational policy. New, 4 
Evangelisation Society, A native, 64 

Fire, 71, 86, 90, 92, 97 
Floods, 8, 65 
Fortified villages, 80 

General missionary progress, 8 
Generous gift from Governor of Hu- 
nan, 101 
German Associates centre, 83 
German China Alliance, 99 
Grand Canal District, 55 

Honoured dead. The, 14 
Hsii, Ordination of Elder, 39 
Hu-nan Province, 100 
Hu-peh Province, 78 

Income, 15, 139 
Industrial Schools, 46, 47 
Itinerations in Sin-kiang, 18, 24 

Jubilee Memorial to Dr. Griffith John, 
11 

Kan River District, 75 



159 



160 



CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 



Kan-suh Province, 22 
Kiang-si Province, 75 
Kiang-8U Province, 64 
Kwang-siu River District, 80 
Kwei-chow Province, 67 

Liberality of Christians, 30, 37, 39, 43, 
46, 48, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 67, 74, 
77, 78, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 86, 87, 
88, 91, 92, 95, 100 

Liebenzell Mission, 102 

** Lily Douthwaite Memorial " Hospital, 
46. 

Local riots, 8 

Medical work, 22, 24, 30, 38, 46, 60, 
51, 52, 65, 57, 60, 61, 64, 65, 66, 
68, 72, 74, 77, 79, 81, 82, 85, 87, 
97, 98, 101 
Membership of Mission, 15 
Memorising extraordinary, 100 
Missionaries, Alphabetical List of, 119 
Missionary Societies in China, Alpha- 
betical List of, 148 
Modern China, 6 

Native Missionary Society, A, 52 
New workers, 14 
Ngan-hwei Province, 85 
North of Great Wall, 34 

Opium curse, The, 3, 24, 33, 70 
Opium Refuge work, 29, 83, 34, 35, 

37, 39, 40, 41, 43, 52, 61, 71, 72, 

74,95 

Personalia, 19 

Ping-yang Pu Plain, 37 

Population of Shanghai, 7 

Preaching Society, A, 61 

Printing-press at Tai-chow, 93 

Prison work, 78 

Progress in Si-chuan, 9 

Property : renting, building, and re- 
pairing, 27, 30, 31, 33, 35, 38, 
48, 49, 61, 61, 63, 65, 68, 71, 74, 
77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 83, 86, 89, 91, 
92-99 



Provincial Conference in Shan-si, 18, 

33 
Province of Ho-nan, 48 

Railways, 33, 43 
Review of the year, 1 
Romanists, 87 

Sanatorium, Chefoo, 45 

Scandinavian China Alliance Mission, 
25, 29, 34 

School work, 23, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 
34, 37, 39, 46, 49, 60, 52, 57, 60, 
61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 68, 74, 76, 79, 
80, 81, 84, 87, 91, 93, 94, 98, 101 

Science work among students, 61 

Secret Societies, 32 

Self-denial in giving, 16 

Self-support, 17, 78, 79, 84, 87, 91, 
93, 96, 98, 101 

Shau-si Opium Refuges, 18, 33 

Shan-si Province, 32 

Shan-tong Province, 44 

Shen-si Province, 26 

Si-chuan Province, 59 

Sin-kiang Province, 24 

Special items, 18 

Spiritual awakening among aborigines, 
18 

Stations and Missionaries of C.I.M., 103 

Stations of Mission, 16 

Statistics for 1st Jan. 1906, 128 

Summer Normal School, 32 

Swedish Holiness Union, 34 

Swedish Mission _in China, 40 

T*ai-yuan Plain, 35 

Tract distribution, 10, 25, 35, 52, 56, 

64, 74, 84, 88, 100 
Translation work, 93 
Treaty of Portsmouth, 2 

Visit of Messrs. 2iantopp and Kane to 
China, 19 

West Si-chuan District, 61 
Western HUl District, Shan-si, 36 

Yuen ShA-kai, H. E., 2 
Yuu-nan Province, 70 



INDEX 



OF THE STATIONS OF THE C.I.M. 



An.ren, 81, 114 
An-shnn, 68, 112 
An-tong, 55, itO 

Bhamo, 72, 113 
Bing-yae, 17, 96, 116 

Ch'ang-sha, 101, 117 
Chang-shan, 99, 117 
Chang-sha, 77, 114 
Chang-teh, 100, 117 
Chefoo, 107 
Chen-chow, 50, 108 
Cheng-ku, 27, 104 
Cheng-yang-kuan, 88, 115 
Chen-kia-kou, 31, 105 
Chen-tu, 6Q, 111 
Chen-yuan (Ean-suh), 25, 104 
Chen-ynan (Kwei-chow), 67, 112 
Cheo-chih, 29, 104 
Chi-an Pu, 78, 114 
Chi-chow, 37, 106 
Chieh-hsin, 36, 106 
Chien-chang, 84, 114 
Chien-chow, 30, 105 
Chih-chow, 85, 115 
Chin-chow, 25, 104 
Chin-kiang, 57, 109 
Chin-ning, 25, 104 
Chin-tze-kwan, 52, 109 
Chin-yun, 96, 117 
Chinng-chow, 66, 110 
Chong-sin, 25, 104 
Chou-kia-kou, 48, 108 
Chu-chow, 116 
Chil-chow, 98, 117 
Chti-hsien, 111 
Chung-kuig, 61, 110 
Chn-tsing Fu, 71, 112 
Chti-wn, 37, 106 



Feng-chen, 34, 105 
Feng-hua, 92, 116 
Feng-siang, 29, 104 
Fu-chow, 83, 115 
Fu-kiang, 23, 104 
Fu-kou, 108 
Fu-shun, 63, 110 

Hai-chow, 41, 107 
Han-cheng, 41, 105 
Han-chung, 28, 104 
Hang-chow, 91, 116 
Han-kow, 73, 118 
Ho-kou Hsien, 83, 114 
Ho-nan, 109 
Ho-tsin, 37, 106 
Ho-yang, 105 
Hsiang-cheng, 52, 109 
Hsiang-ning, 87 (O.S.) 
Hsiao-yi, 36, 106 
Hsien-chti, 94, 116 
Hsin-chang, 91, 116 
Hsin-feng Hsien, 80, 114 
Hsing-an, 26, 104 
Hsing-ping, 80, 105 
Hsuan-hua, 48, 107 
Hsti-ting, 61, 111 
Huang-yen, 94, 116 
Hung-tung, 33, 38, 106 
Huo-chow, 38, 39, 106 
Hun-yaan, 35, 106 
Hwai-luh, 42, 107 
Hwei-chow, 87, 115 

I-chang, 73, 113 
I-shi, 41 (O.S.) 
I-yang Hsien, 83, 114 

Eai-feng Fn, 51, 108 
Kai-hsien, 111 
Kan-chow Fu, 17, 79, 114 



161 



m: 



162 



CHINA AND THE GOSPEL 



Kao-yu, 66, 110 
Kiang-chow, 106 
Eiang-tsin, 62, 110 
Kiifc-ting Fir, 66, 110 
Kien-ping, 86, 116 
Eien-yang, 30, 106 
Kin-hua, 97, 117 
Kiu-kiang, 76, 113 
Kuang-chow, 109 
Kuh-cheng, 74, 118 
Ku-ling, 118 
Kwang-hsin Fa, 82, 114 
Kwang-te Chow, 86, 116 
Kwang-yuan, 60, 111 
Kwan-hsien, 66, 111 
Kwei-chi flsien, 17, 81, 114 
Kwei-fu, 111 
Kwei-hua-cheng, 34, 106 
Kwei-yang, 67, 112 

Lai-an, 87, 116 
Lan-chi, 97, 117 
Lan-chow, 22, 103 
Lan-tien, 31, 106 
Lao-ho-keo, 73, 113 
liang-chow, 23, 103 
liang-shan, 111 
Li-chuan, 30, 106 
Lm-kiang Fu, 77, 114 
Liu-an-chow, 88, 116 
Long-chow, 29, 106 
Lu-an, 40, 107 
Lu-cheng, 40, 107 
Lu-chiao, 116 
Lu-chow, 68, 110 
Lung-chuan Hsien, 79, 114 
Liing-chtian, 117 
Lung-chu-ts'ai, 31, 106 

Mei-chow, 66 
Mei-hsieD, 29, 104 
Mien-ch'i, 109 
Mien-hsien, 28, 104 
Mo-kan-shan, 116 

Nan-chang Fu, 76, 116 
Nan-feng, 84, 114 
Nan-kang Fu, 76, 113 
Nan-pu, 60, 111 
Ngan-kin, 85, 116 
Ning-hai (Cheh-kiang), 92, 116 
Ning-hai (Shan-tong), 47, 108 
Ning-hsia, 24 (O.S.) 
Ning-kuo Fu, 86, 116 
Ning-po, 92, 116 

Pa-chow, 111 
Pang-hai, 69, 112 



Pao-ching Fu, 117 
Pao-ning, 60, 111 
Pao-t'eo, 34, 106 
Pin-chow, 30, 106 
Ping-i, 70, 113 
Ping-liang Fu, 26, 104 
Ping-yang, 38, 106 
Ping-yao, 83, 36, 106 
Pu-chow, 107 

Rao-chow Fu, 80, 113 

Sa-U-tsi, 34, 106 

Saug-kia-chuang, 30, 106 

Shae-k'i-tien, 109 

Shanghai, 7, 64, 109 

Shang-tsing, 81, 114 

Shao-hsing, 91, 116 

Shi-nan Fu, 74 (O.S.) 
, Shui-an, 116 
I Shun-king, 61, 111 

Shun-teh Fu, 43, 107 

Si-an, 30, 104 

Siao-shih, 62, 110 

Si-chow, 36, 106 

Si-hsiang, 27, 104 

Si-hwa, 49, 108 

Si-kuan, 74 (O.S.) 

Si-nan, 109 

Si.ning, 24, 103 

Sin-tien-tsi, 60, 111 

Soh-ping, 35, 106 

Sui Fu, 64, 110 

Sung-yang, 117 

Tai-chow, 98, 116 
Tai-ho, 89, 116 
Tai-kang, 60, 108 
Tai-ping, 94, 116 
Tai-shuen, 96 
Ta-ku-tang, 76, 118 
Ta-li, 72, 113 
Ta-ning, 86, 106 
Tan-lin, 66 (O.S.) 
Ta-tung, 84, 106 
Tien-tai, 98, 116 
Tien-tsin, 42, 107 
To-chien-lo, 66, 110 
Tong-lu, 98, 117 
Tsen-i, 68, 112 
Tsin-chow, 28, 103 
Tsing-kiang-pu, 66, 110 
Tso-yun, 106 
Tuh-shan, 68, 112 
Tung-chow, 41, 106 
Tung-hsiang flsien, 81, 114 

Uin-iang, 111 
U-shan, 111 



StatI ° 




-£t^%uIR We*t-<»««-. oWwc'^ .■J&I^^^^Mt 

.A.-it.---.,. *"^° I CAN- ifq^^^ _ 

H u p E H ?^'""e= =^J!ri^;^v^-w^5 . 




INDEX OF STATIONS AND OUT-STATIONS 163 



Wan-hsien, 111 
Wen-chow, 95, 116 
Wu-hu, 86, 116 
Wu-kong, 30, 105 

Yang-chow, 56,' 110 
Yang-hsien, 27, 104 
Yang-kou Hsien, 82, 114 
Yen-cheng, 49, 108 
Yen-chow Fu, 98, 117 
Yi-cheng, 106 

Ying-chow (Shan-si), 34, 106 
Ying-chow Fu (Ngan-hwei), 88, 115 
Ying-kia-wei, 81, 105 



Ying-shan, 111 

Yi-shi, 106 

Yoh-yang, 89, 106 

Yuan-chow Fu (Hu-nan), 102, 117 

Yuan-chow Fu (Kiang-si), 78, 114 

Yun-cheng, 107 

Yung-kang, 96, 117 

Yung-ning, 109 

Yung-sin Hsien, 79, 114 

Yun-ho, 117 

Yun-nan, 71, 112 

Yu-shan Hsien, 82, 114 

Yu-wli, 40, 107 



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